Addictive Disorders and Clinical Psychiatry – Part I

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2022) | Viewed by 11043

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Psychiatry, Radboudumc, 6525 GC Nijmegen, The Netherlands
2. Nijmegen Institute for Scientist-Practitioners in Addiction (NISPA), 6525 HR Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Interests: addiction; psychiatry; comorbidity; clinical; translational
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Dear Colleagues,

Addictive disorders are among the most common psychopathologies, with tremendous impact for the individual, their direct social context, and society. Addictive disorders are, however, a heterogeneous set of disorders, encompassing addiction to different psychic-active substances as well as behavioral addictions. Furthermore, addictive disorders often co-occur with other psychiatric and physical conditions, which commonly leads to the course of both disorders being negatively affected. To further the field, it is paramount to gain more insight into the clinical heterogeneity of addictive disorders and, consequently, to develop more personalized treatment matching. Such an approach should ultimately improve the treatment outcome. 

For this Special Issue of the Journal of Clinical Medicine entitled “Addictive Disorders and Clinical Psychiatry”, we welcome contributions from the field of addiction medicine and addiction psychiatry and psychology that focus on clinical addiction research. The submission of contributions translating basic (neuro) science to clinical populations or that target clinical heterogeneity and psychiatric comorbidity are strongly encouraged. We invite original research papers based on original data, as well as brief communications and review articles. All manuscripts will go through a standard peer-review procedure, in line with the journal’s procedure and policies.

Dr. Arnt F. A Schellekens
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Psychiatry
  • Comorbidity
  • Clinical Psychiatry
  • Translational

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 292 KiB  
Article
Reactive and Regulative Temperament in Relation to Clinical Symptomatology and Personality Disorders in Patients with a Substance Use Disorder
by Els Santens, Geert Dom, Eva Dierckx and Laurence Claes
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(3), 591; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11030591 - 25 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2055
Abstract
Temperament and personality traits are important factors underlying the vulnerability for both the initiation and continuation of addictive behaviors. We investigated the influence of reactive and regulative temperament and their interaction in relation to clinical symptomatology and personality disorders (PDs) in a sample [...] Read more.
Temperament and personality traits are important factors underlying the vulnerability for both the initiation and continuation of addictive behaviors. We investigated the influence of reactive and regulative temperament and their interaction in relation to clinical symptomatology and personality disorders (PDs) in a sample of 841 inpatients (68.1% males) with a substance use disorder (SUD). To assess reactive temperament we used the Behavioral Inhibition and Behavioral Activation Scales (BISBAS) and to assess regulative temperament we used the Effortful Control Scale. Clinical symptomatology and personality traits were measured by means of the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) and the Assessment of ADP-IV Personality Disorders (ADP-IV). Hierarchical regression analyses showed that both, clinical symptomatology and PDs were related to low levels of effortful control (EC). None of the two-way interactions (BIS × EC, BAS × EC) however were significantly related to psychopathology. Current findings highlight the role of effortful control (EC) in the expression of psychopathology in an adult sample of inpatients with SUD. Therapeutic interventions aiming at strengthening EC can possibly result in better treatment outcomes for both the addiction and the comorbid psychopathology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addictive Disorders and Clinical Psychiatry – Part I)
11 pages, 839 KiB  
Article
Relationship between Depressive Symptoms, Personality, and Binge Drinking among University Students in Spain
by Manuel Herrero-Montes, Cristina Alonso-Blanco, María Paz-Zulueta, Amada Pellico-López, Laura Ruiz-Azcona, Carmen Sarabia-Cobo, Víctor Fradejas-Sastre, Ester Boixadera-Planas and Paula Parás-Bravo
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(1), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11010053 - 23 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2492
Abstract
Binge drinking (BD) is a common practice among college students. Alcohol consumption has been related to depressive symptoms and certain personality factors, although less is known about the relationship of these variables with BD. The aim of this study was to analyze the [...] Read more.
Binge drinking (BD) is a common practice among college students. Alcohol consumption has been related to depressive symptoms and certain personality factors, although less is known about the relationship of these variables with BD. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship of BD with depressive symptoms and personality in university students. We performed a cross-sectional study among students (aged 18–30 years) enrolled in the academic year 2018–2019 at the Faculty of Nursing of the University of Cantabria (Spain). Sociodemographic, academic, and alcohol and other drug use information was collected by means of a semi-structured questionnaire. The Beck Depression Inventory-II was used to measure depressive symptomatology and the Neo Five-Factor Inventory was used for personality. A total of 142 participants were included, 88.03% of which were women. Up to 38.03% were classified as BD. Concerning depressive symptoms, 7.41% of BD were at the moderate-severe level compared to 3.41% of non-BD (p = 0.7096). Regarding personality, the median score for extraversion of BD was 35 (Q1 = 29, Q3 = 40), 32 (Q1 = 28, Q3 = 36) in non-BD (p = 0.0062), conscientiousness scored 34 (Q1 = 30.5, Q3 = 38) points in non-BD, 31.50 (Q1 = 27, Q3 = 37) in BD (p = 0.0224). In conclusion, BD students have higher levels of extraversion and lower levels of responsibility than non-BD students. No significant differences were found between the level of depressive symptomatology between BD and non-BD students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addictive Disorders and Clinical Psychiatry – Part I)
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10 pages, 283 KiB  
Article
Beta-Endorphin and Oxytocin in Patients with Alcohol Use Disorder and Comorbid Depression
by Olga V. Roschina, Lyudmila A. Levchuk, Anastasiia S. Boiko, Ekaterina V. Michalitskaya, Elena V. Epimakhova, Innokentiy S. Losenkov, German G. Simutkin, Anton J. M. Loonen, Nikolay A. Bokhan and Svetlana A. Ivanova
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(23), 5696; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10235696 - 3 Dec 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2117
Abstract
Background: The neuropeptides β-endorphin and oxytocin are released into the bloodstream as hormones from the pituitary gland but also have an important function as neuroregulators in the forebrain. The blood levels of both polypeptides have been shown to reflect depressive symptoms. β-Endorphin, in [...] Read more.
Background: The neuropeptides β-endorphin and oxytocin are released into the bloodstream as hormones from the pituitary gland but also have an important function as neuroregulators in the forebrain. The blood levels of both polypeptides have been shown to reflect depressive symptoms. β-Endorphin, in particular, is also involved in abstinence from alcohol. Methods: The serum levels of β-endorphin and oxytocin were measured during the early withdrawal phase in patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD) with (N = 35) or without (N = 45) depressive comorbidity and compared with those in healthy volunteers (N = 23). In addition to comparing the groups, the study examined whether serum levels correlated with various psychometric measures of dependence, depression and aggression, as well as with clinical characteristics of dependence. Results: Both serum levels of beta-endorphin and oxytocin were significantly lower in patients than those in healthy controls (p = 0.011 for β-endorphin and p = 0.005 for oxytocin, Kruskal–Wallis test). In patients with depressive comorbidity, the significance was greatest (p = 0.005 for β-endorphin and p = 0.004 for oxytocin, U-test). There was no correlation with clinical or psychometric parameters (p > 0.05, Spearman test), but beta-endorphin levels did correlate significantly with physical aggression (p = 0.026, Spearman test). Conclusions: Serum levels of β-endorphin and oxytocin are lower in patients with AUD, particularly in those with depressive comorbidity. β-Endorphin levels correlated with physical aggression according to the Buss–Durkee (BDHI) estimates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addictive Disorders and Clinical Psychiatry – Part I)
12 pages, 805 KiB  
Article
Behavioral, Emotional and Social Apathy in Alcohol-Related Cognitive Disorders
by Maud E. G. van Dorst, Yvonne C. M. Rensen, Masud Husain and Roy P. C. Kessels
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(11), 2447; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10112447 - 31 May 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2692
Abstract
Apathy is a fundamental neuropsychiatric symptom of Korsakoff’s syndrome (KS) and has also been reported in patients with alcohol use disorder with no (AUD) or less severe cognitive impairments (ARCI). However, research on the nature of apathy is limited in these groups. Aim [...] Read more.
Apathy is a fundamental neuropsychiatric symptom of Korsakoff’s syndrome (KS) and has also been reported in patients with alcohol use disorder with no (AUD) or less severe cognitive impairments (ARCI). However, research on the nature of apathy is limited in these groups. Aim of this study was to examine the multidimensional nature of apathy in patients with KS, ARCI and AUD. Moreover, we examined differences between apathy ratings by patients and their professional caregivers, and related apathy to everyday functioning and overall cognition. Twenty-five patients with KS, 25 patients with ARCI and 23 patients with AUD participated in this study. Apathy was measured using the apathy motivation index (AMI), which distinguishes behavioral, emotional and social apathy. Both patients and professional caregivers reported social apathy as the most prominent symptom, compared to behavioral and emotional apathy. Apathy ratings did not differ across the three patient groups. Discrepancies between patient and caregiver ratings were observed in patients with KS and ARCI, with more severe apathy reported by caregivers. Caregiver-reported behavioral and social, but not emotional, apathy was related to everyday functioning. These results show that apathy is present in a substantial proportion of patients with alcohol addiction with or without cognitive impairments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addictive Disorders and Clinical Psychiatry – Part I)
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