Special Issue "New Frontiers in Structural Heart Disease"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Cardiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Edward Koifman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Cardiology, Soroka Medical Center; Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
Interests: structural heart disease; complex coronary interventions; intracoronary imaging and physiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the field of structural heart disease has experienced an immense evolution in diagnostic and treatment modalities, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), which has expanded in application from high-surgical-risk to low-risk patients and will be a disruptive technology in the management of aortic valve disease patients. Mitral clip has shown superb results for the mortality and rehospitalization of heart failure patients with mitral regurgitation and is currently also being studied in tricuspid regurgitation patients. The percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage has been shown to reduce bleeding, and in patients at high risk of bleeding, patent foramen ovale closure has been shown to reduce recurrent strokes. These developments have enabled a further understanding of the disease process and improved diagnostic pathways such as the use of various imaging software and research into various conditions such as low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis. Further therapeutic solutions are in development for various structural heart disease conditions, while the diagnosis and therapy of these patients is continuously improving, allowing safer, more efficacious, less invasive and more personalized treatment options.

The current issue is aimed at presenting cutting-edge research and a review of recent developments in the various structural heart disorders.

Kind regards,

Dr. Edward Koifman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • structural heart disease
  • aortic valve disease
  • mitral valve disease
  • tricuspid valve disease
  • left atrial appendage closure
  • patent foramen ovale
  • atrial septal defect

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
High Post-Procedural Transvalvular Gradient or Delayed Mean Gradient Increase after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Incidence, Prognosis and Associated Variables. The FRANCE-2 Registry
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(15), 3221; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10153221 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 277
Abstract
Mean Gradient (MG) elevation can be detected immediately after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) or secondarily during follow-up. Comparisons and interactions between these two parameters and their impact on outcomes have not previously been investigated. This study aimed to identify incidence, influence on [...] Read more.
Mean Gradient (MG) elevation can be detected immediately after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) or secondarily during follow-up. Comparisons and interactions between these two parameters and their impact on outcomes have not previously been investigated. This study aimed to identify incidence, influence on prognosis, and parameters associated with immediate high post-procedural mean transvalvular gradient (PPMG) and delayed mean gradient increase (6 to 12 months after TAVI, DMGI) in the FRANCE 2 (French Aortic National CoreValve and Edwards 2) registry. The registry includes all consecutive symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis who have undergone TAVI. Three groups were analyzed: (1) PPMG < 20 mmHg without DMGI > 10 mmHg (control); (2) PPMG < 20 mmHg with DMGI > 10 mmHg (Group 1); and (3) PPMG ≥ 20 mmHg (Group 2). From January 2010 to January 2012, 4201 consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled in the registry. Controls comprised 2078 patients. In Group 1(n = 131 patients), DMGI exceeded 10 mmHg in 5.6%, and was not associated with greater 4-years mortality than in controls (32.6% vs. 40.1%, p = 0.27). In Group 2 (n = 144 patients), PPMG was at least 20 mmHg in 6.1% and was associated with higher 4-year mortality (48.7% versus 40.1%, p = 0.005). A total of two-thirds of the patients with PPMG ≥ 20 mmHg had MG < 20 mmHg at 1 year, with mortality similar to the controls (39.2% vs. 40.1%, p = 0.73). Patients with PPMG > 20 mmHg 1 year post-TAVI had higher 4-years mortality than the general population of the registry, unlike patients with MG normalization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Structural Heart Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop