State of the Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Dentistry, Oral Surgery and Oral Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 4769

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Sensory and Motor System Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan
Interests: oral health; oral health care; oral cancer; oral infectious diseases; oral and maxillofacial surgery
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to invite you to submit a contribution to this Special Issue of the Journal of Clinical Medicine on the “State-of-the-Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries”.

Oral diseases, such as dental caries and periodontal disease, are extremely detrimental to public health due to their high incidence, successively known to be associated with various systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes, rheumatism, cancer, etc. It is now widely recognized that oral health cannot be considered in isolation from other health problems, and its treatment and prevention are becoming increasingly important.

Japan is facing a super-aging society as well as a need to extend the healthy life span and improve the quality of life (QOL). To this end, one key issue is “oral health”, and the improvement of oral hygiene and chewing ability is known to be effective in reducing aspiration pneumonia and improving activities of daily living (ADL). Furthermore, from a long-term perspective, we have to focus on oral health in children and adolescents, not only to survive the super-aging society, but also to improve the oral and general health of the next generation.

This Special Issue welcomes manuscripts focusing on the current state of knowledge on oral/dental health in Japan and Other Aging Countries, all original (both of clinical research and basic research) and review articles being welcome. Other accepted manuscript types include methodological papers, case series, brief reports, and commentaries. We hope you will contribute your high-quality research and we look forward to hearing from you.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in IJERPH.

Dr. Masanobu Abe
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • oral health
  • oral health care
  • oral cancer
  • dental caries
  • dental decay
  • periodontal diseases
  • periodontitis
  • gingivitis
  • oral infectious diseases
  • oral and maxillofacial surgery
  • supportive care
  • malocclusion
  • orthodontics

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 733 KiB  
Article
Machine Learning Prediction of Tongue Pressure in Elderly Patients with Head and Neck Tumor: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Xuewei Han, Ziyi Bai, Kaoru Mogushi, Takeshi Hase, Katsuyuki Takeuchi, Yoritsugu Iida, Yuka I. Sumita and Noriyuki Wakabayashi
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(8), 2363; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13082363 - 18 Apr 2024
Viewed by 579
Abstract
Background: This investigation sought to cross validate the predictors of tongue pressure recovery in elderly patients’ post-treatment for head and neck tumors, leveraging advanced machine learning techniques. Methods: By employing logistic regression, support vector regression, random forest, and extreme gradient boosting, the study [...] Read more.
Background: This investigation sought to cross validate the predictors of tongue pressure recovery in elderly patients’ post-treatment for head and neck tumors, leveraging advanced machine learning techniques. Methods: By employing logistic regression, support vector regression, random forest, and extreme gradient boosting, the study analyzed an array of variables including patient demographics, surgery types, dental health status, and age, drawn from comprehensive medical records and direct tongue pressure assessments. Results: Among the models, logistic regression emerged as the most effective, demonstrating an accuracy of 0.630 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.370–0.778], F1 score of 0.688 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.435–0.853], precision of 0.611 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.313–0.801], recall of 0.786 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.413–0.938] and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.626 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.409–0.806]. This model distinctly highlighted the significance of glossectomy (p = 0.039), the presence of functional teeth (p = 0.043), and the patient’s age (p = 0.044) as pivotal factors influencing tongue pressure, setting the threshold for statistical significance at p < 0.05. Conclusions: The analysis underscored the critical role of glossectomy, the presence of functional natural teeth, and age as determinants of tongue pressure in logistics regression, with the presence of natural teeth and the tumor site located in the tongue consistently emerging as the key predictors across all computational models employed in this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State of the Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
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11 pages, 1216 KiB  
Article
Factors Related to Masticatory Rhythm in Patients with Oral Tumors
by Xuewei Han, Mariko Hattori, Yuka I. Sumita, Mihoko Haraguchi and Noriyuki Wakabayashi
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(7), 1926; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13071926 - 26 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background: Older adults who have undergone surgery for oral tumors are at increased risk of impaired masticatory rhythm. This study investigated the correlations between masticatory rhythm, objective masticatory performance, and subjective masticatory performance as well as factors related to masticatory rhythm. Methods: The [...] Read more.
Background: Older adults who have undergone surgery for oral tumors are at increased risk of impaired masticatory rhythm. This study investigated the correlations between masticatory rhythm, objective masticatory performance, and subjective masticatory performance as well as factors related to masticatory rhythm. Methods: The participants were 44 adults (24 men, 20 women; age range 42~90 years old) who had undergone maxillectomy, mandibulectomy, or glossectomy and were rehabilitated with a maxillofacial prosthesis. The number of functional contact teeth pairs was confirmed by intraoral examination. Chewing rate, cycle duration, coefficient of variation (CV) for cycle duration (reflecting the stability of masticatory rhythm), and mixing ability were measured simultaneously using a mastication movement rhythm tracking device during gum chewing. Maximum occlusal force was measured using the dental prescale system. Patients’ perception of chewing ability was rated using a questionnaire. Results: The Spearman’s rank correlation test revealed that mixing ability, patient-rated masticatory scores, cycle duration, CV for cycle duration, and maximum occlusal force showed significant correlations with chewing rate. Multiple linear regression analysis identified mixing ability and the CV for cycle duration as significant predictors of masticatory rhythm. Conclusions: Factors associated with a faster chewing rate were higher mixing ability and masticatory scores, greater maximum occlusal force, shorter cycle duration, and smaller CV for cycle duration. Stable masticatory rhythm and mixing ability are significant predictors of chewing rate. Poor masticatory performance and unstable masticatory rhythm can result in slower chewing and thus a higher risk of inadequate dietary intake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State of the Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
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10 pages, 1899 KiB  
Article
Comprehensive Analyses of Masticatory Function in Maxillectomy Patients with Functioning Removable Prostheses: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study
by Masahiro Kawasaki, Yoichiro Ogino, Ryoji Moroi and Yasunori Ayukawa
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(15), 5117; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12155117 - 4 Aug 2023
Viewed by 841
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to comprehensively assess masticatory function in maxillectomy patients with functioning removable prostheses. Their general and oral profiles, the measurement values of their oral functions, including masticatory function, and the history of tumor therapy were extracted [...] Read more.
The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to comprehensively assess masticatory function in maxillectomy patients with functioning removable prostheses. Their general and oral profiles, the measurement values of their oral functions, including masticatory function, and the history of tumor therapy were extracted from medical charts. The correlations of masticatory function with numerical data and the effects of tumor therapy-related factors on masticatory function were evaluated. In addition, a stepwise conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the potential predictive factors comprehensively. The data from 55 maxillectomy patients revealed that the median value of masticatory function (138.0 mg/dL) was higher than the threshold (100.0 mg/dL) based on the concept of oral hypofunction. Moderate correlations of masticatory function with the number of remaining teeth, the number of functioning occlusal supports, and maximum occlusal force were found, as well as a weak correlation with maximum tongue pressure. These variables also showed statistically significant coefficients (p < 0.01). No significant effect of each tumor therapy-related factor on masticatory function was detected. A logistic regression analysis identified the number of functioning occlusal supports as a significant predictive factor. These results implied the crucial interactions of masticatory function with various factors and the specificities of maxillectomy patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State of the Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
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Review

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28 pages, 1220 KiB  
Review
The Link between Periodontal Disease and Asthma: How Do These Two Diseases Affect Each Other?
by Hiroyuki Tamiya, Masanobu Abe, Takahide Nagase and Akihisa Mitani
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(21), 6747; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12216747 - 25 Oct 2023
Viewed by 2250
Abstract
A growing body of evidence suggests that the effects of poor oral hygiene extend beyond the oral cavity and are associated with a variety of systemic diseases, including asthma. Asthma, which results in symptoms of cough, wheezing, and dyspnoea, and is characterized by [...] Read more.
A growing body of evidence suggests that the effects of poor oral hygiene extend beyond the oral cavity and are associated with a variety of systemic diseases, including asthma. Asthma, which results in symptoms of cough, wheezing, and dyspnoea, and is characterized by airflow limitation with variability and (partial or complete) reversibility, is amongst the most prevalent respiratory diseases with approximately 262 million patients worldwide, and its prevalence and disease burden is on the increase. While asthma can occur at a young age, it can also develop later in life and affects a variety of age groups. Both of these diseases have a chronic course, and various researchers have suggested a link between the two. In this article, we aim to provide a literature review focusing on the association between the two diseases. The results demonstrate that medications (primarily, inhaler medicine), hypoxia induced by asthma, and the breathing behaviour of patients potentially trigger periodontal disease. In contrast, oral periodontopathogenic microorganisms and the inflammatory mediators produced by them may be involved in the onset and/or exacerbation of asthma. Common contributing factors, such as smoking, gastro-oesophageal reflux, and type-2 inflammation, should also be considered when evaluating the relationship between the two diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State of the Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
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Other

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15 pages, 534 KiB  
Systematic Review
Oral-Health-Related Quality of Life in Elderly Edentulous Patients with Full-Arch Rehabilitation Treatments: A Systematic Review
by Tin Thinzar Linn, Angkoon Khaohoen, Khaing Myat Thu and Pimduen Rungsiyakull
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(12), 3391; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13123391 - 10 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Background: The improvement of oral-health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) with different types of prosthesis for completely edentulous jaws in the elderly population is a critical factor in clinical decision making for these vulnerable patients. This review aims to evaluate the changes in [...] Read more.
Background: The improvement of oral-health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) with different types of prosthesis for completely edentulous jaws in the elderly population is a critical factor in clinical decision making for these vulnerable patients. This review aims to evaluate the changes in OHRQoL after treatment with different types of full-arch prostheses in the elderly edentulous population to determine the prostheses that result in the greatest improvement in OHRQoL. Materials and Methods: Clinical studies of different types of full-arch prostheses that measured the OHRQoL in edentulous patients 60 years or older were searched for in the PubMed, Embase and Scopus electronic databases, with additional hand searching to summarize the outcomes of the selected studies. Result: Among the 302 identified studies, 10 studies were selected. A total of 504 patients wearing 133 complete dentures, 372 implant overdentures and 39 fixed prostheses were assessed among the selected studies. The overall OHIP and GOHAI scores were evaluated at baseline and in the 3rd, 6th, 12th and 18th months of treatment with the respective prostheses. The improved OHRQoL with overall OHIP scores associated with conventional dentures were 9.21–12.5% from the 3rd month to 1 year after treatment, whereas those associated with implant overdentures and full-arch fixed prosthesis were 9–25.26% at 1 year and 18.53–26.79 at the 18th-month follow-up, respectively. The increased overall GOHAI scores were 21.3–25.43% for conventional dentures, 36.82–41.32% for implant overdentures and 39.48–42.83% for full-arch fixed prosthesis from the 3rd month to the 6th-month follow-up. Conclusion: In general, the improvement in OHRQoL after rehabilitation with implant overdentures declined at one year, and that with full-arch fixed prosthesis declined at the 18th-month follow-up; meanwhile, the OHRQoL associated with conventional dentures improved stably up to one year, but the implant-supported prostheses resulted in an obviously greater improvement in the OHRQoL than that obtained with conventional dentures. However, studies with longer follow-up periods are still required to evaluate the long-term clinical effectiveness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State of the Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
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