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State-of-the-Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 15313

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Sensory and Motor System Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan
Interests: oral health; oral health care; oral cancer; oral infectious diseases; oral and maxillofacial surgery
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to invite you to submit a contribution to this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health on the “State-of-the-Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries”.

Oral diseases, such as dental caries and periodontal disease, are extremely detrimental to public health due to their high incidence, successively known to be associated with various systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes, rheumatism, cancer, etc. It is now widely recognized that oral health cannot be considered in isolation from other health problems, and its treatment and prevention are becoming increasingly important.

Japan is facing a super-aging society as well as a need to extend the healthy life span and improve the quality of life (QOL). To this end, one key issue is “oral health”, and the improvement of oral hygiene and chewing ability is known to be effective in reducing aspiration pneumonia and improving activities of daily living (ADL). Furthermore, from a long-term perspective, we have to focus on oral health in children and adolescents, not only to survive the super-aging society, but also to improve the oral and general health of the next generation.

This Special Issue welcomes manuscripts focusing on the current state of knowledge on oral/dental health in Japan and Other Aging Countries, all original (both of clinical research and basic research) and review articles being welcome. Other accepted manuscript types include methodological papers, case series, brief reports, and commentaries. We hope you will contribute your high-quality research and we look forward to hearing from you.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in JCM.

Dr. Masanobu Abe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral health
  • oral health care
  • oral cancer
  • dental caries
  • dental decay
  • periodontal diseases
  • periodontitis
  • gingivitis
  • oral infectious diseases
  • oral and maxillofacial surgery
  • supportive care
  • malocclusion
  • orthodontics

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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4 pages, 273 KiB  
Editorial
Oral Health in Japan: State-of-the-Art and Perspectives
by Masanobu Abe, Akihisa Mitani, Atsushi Yao, Liang Zong, Chun-Dong Zhang, Kazuto Hoshi and Shintaro Yanagimoto
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(14), 8232; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19148232 - 6 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1623
Abstract
In the near future, Japan is entering a super-aging society that will be called the age of 100 years of life [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
4 pages, 566 KiB  
Editorial
Systemic Disorders Closely Associated with Malocclusion in Late Adolescence: A Review and Perspective
by Masanobu Abe, Akihisa Mitani, Atsushi Yao, Kazuto Hoshi and Shintaro Yanagimoto
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3401; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063401 - 14 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2301
Abstract
Oral diseases such as dental caries and periodontal disease are reported to be associated with various systemic diseases such as heart disease, respiratory disease, diabetes, rheumatism, and metabolic syndrome, thus increasing the importance of prevention and early treatment [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
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Research

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14 pages, 568 KiB  
Article
Influence of School Type and Class Level on Mean Caries Experience in 12-Year-Olds in Serial Cross-Sectional National Oral Health Survey in Germany—Proposal to Adjust for Selection Bias
by Julian Schmoeckel, Goetz Wahl, Ruth M. Santamaría, Roger Basner, Elisabeth Schankath and Christian H. Splieth
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(4), 467; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21040467 - 10 Apr 2024
Viewed by 830
Abstract
The objective of this study is to analyse the effects of attended school type and class level on the reported caries experience (DMFT) obtained in the serial cross-sectional National Oral Health Study in Children in Germany (NOHSC) for the WHO reference group of [...] Read more.
The objective of this study is to analyse the effects of attended school type and class level on the reported caries experience (DMFT) obtained in the serial cross-sectional National Oral Health Study in Children in Germany (NOHSC) for the WHO reference group of 12-year-olds. Methods: Caries data from the 2016 NOHSC were adjusted for each federal state on the basis of two additional large-scale datasets for school type and class level. Results: Twelve-year-olds in all grades in Saxony-Anhalt (n = 96,842) exhibited significantly higher DMFT values than 12-year-olds in 6th grade (n = 76,456; +0.10 DMFT; ~14.2%, p < 0.001). Adjustments for school type had effects on DMFT on the level of federal states but almost balanced out on the national level (−0.01 DMFT; ~2%). Due to putatively similar structures of the federal states, the national mean DMFT for 12-year-olds in the latest NOHSC (2016; n = 55,002) was adjusted from 0.44 to 0.50 DMFT, correcting for selection bias. Conclusion: Selection bias in this NOHSC leads to an underestimation of caries levels by about 15%. Due to very low caries experience in children in Germany, these precise adjustments (+0.06 DMFT) have only a minor effect on interpretations of the national epidemiologic situation. Consequently, other national caries studies worldwide using the robust marker of DMFT should also adjust for systematic selection bias related to socio-economic background rather than increasing efforts in examination strategy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
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10 pages, 1993 KiB  
Article
A Comparative Study of Periodontal Health Status between International and Domestic University Students in Japan
by Masanobu Abe, Ai Ohsato, Yuko Fujihara, Kazuto Hoshi and Shintaro Yanagimoto
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 3866; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20053866 - 22 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1486
Abstract
Background: In our previous study, international university students showed a significantly higher dental caries morbidity rate than domestic students. On the other hand, the periodontal health status of international university students has not been clarified yet. In this study, we compared the periodontal [...] Read more.
Background: In our previous study, international university students showed a significantly higher dental caries morbidity rate than domestic students. On the other hand, the periodontal health status of international university students has not been clarified yet. In this study, we compared the periodontal health status of international and domestic university students in Japan. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the clinical data of the university students that visited a dental clinic in the division for health service promotion at a university in Tokyo for screening between April 2017 and March 2019. Bleeding on probing (BOP), calculus deposition and probing pocket depth (PPD) were investigated. Results: The records of 231 university students (79 international and 152 domestic university students) were analyzed; 84.8% of international students were from Asian countries (n = 67). The international university students showed a higher percentage of BOP than domestic students (49.4% and 34.2%, respectively: p < 0.05) and they showed more extensive calculus deposition (calculus grading score [CGS]) than domestic university students (1.68 and 1.43, respectively: p < 0.01), despite no significant difference in PPD. Conclusions: The current study shows that international university students have poorer periodontal health than domestic students in Japan, even though the result might include many uncertainties and possible biases. To prevent severe periodontitis in the future, regular checkups and thorough oral health care are essential for the university students, especially those from foreign countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
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13 pages, 1541 KiB  
Article
Retrospective Analysis of Treatment Outcomes of Maxillary Sinusitis Associated with Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw
by Mitsunobu Otsuru, Saki Hayashida, Kota Morishita, Maho Murata, Sakiko Soutome, Miho Sasaki, Yukinori Takagi, Misa Sumi and Masahiro Umeda
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(12), 7430; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19127430 - 17 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2094
Abstract
Although maxillary sinusitis often occurs in patients with medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) of the upper jaw, there have been few reports on the treatment and outcomes for maxillary sinusitis associated with maxillary MRONJ. This study aimed to retrospectively investigate the treatment [...] Read more.
Although maxillary sinusitis often occurs in patients with medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) of the upper jaw, there have been few reports on the treatment and outcomes for maxillary sinusitis associated with maxillary MRONJ. This study aimed to retrospectively investigate the treatment outcomes of maxillary sinusitis in patients with MRONJ of the upper jaw. There were 34 patients diagnosed with maxillary MRONJ and sinusitis by preoperative computed tomography who underwent surgery in our institution between January 2011 and December 2019. Age, sex, primary disease, stage of MRONJ, class and administration period of an antiresorptive agent, corticosteroid administration, preoperative leukocyte count and serum albumin level, periosteal reaction, sinusitis grade, maxillary sinus surgical procedure, and treatment outcomes of MRONJ and sinusitis were examined. There were 7 male and 27 female patients (average age, 74.7 years). Complete healing of MRONJ was obtained in 29 of 34 patients (85.3%). Maxillary sinusitis resolved or improved in 21 patients (61.8%) but did not change or worsen in 13 patients (38.2%). We found that complete resection of necrotic bone with intraoperative irrigation of the maxillary sinus may provide good treatment outcomes for maxillary sinusitis associated with MRONJ, although our findings were not statistically significant owing to the small number of patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
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8 pages, 295 KiB  
Article
A Cross-Sectional Survey on the Association between Dental Health Conditions and University Personality Inventory Scores among University Students: A Single-Center Study in Japan
by Shigeo Ishikawa, Naohiko Makino, Hitoshi Togashi, Nanami Ito, Atsushi Tsuya, Makiko Hayasaka, Tsuneo Konta, Naoki Okuyama, Kazuyuki Yusa and Mitsuyoshi Iino
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(8), 4622; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084622 - 12 Apr 2022
Viewed by 1454
Abstract
This study examined the association between dental health conditions and scores on the University Personality Inventory (UPI) among university students in Japan. Participants were freshmen at Yamagata University between 2010 and 2019. Dental check-ups, including dental caries, periodontal disease, malocclusion, and temporomandibular disorders [...] Read more.
This study examined the association between dental health conditions and scores on the University Personality Inventory (UPI) among university students in Japan. Participants were freshmen at Yamagata University between 2010 and 2019. Dental check-ups, including dental caries, periodontal disease, malocclusion, and temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and mental health screening using the UPI were performed; 12,433 students were included in the final analysis. A logistic regression analysis was performed to confirm the association between dental health conditions and >30 UPI scores, which indicate the need to consult mental health professionals. Overall, students who required treatment for TMD had a 3.165-fold higher risk of >30 UPI scores (OR = 3.165, 95% CI = 1.710–5.857). Periodontal disease and TMD in male participants (periodontal disease: OR = 1.329, 95% CI = 1.108–1.595; TMD: OR = 3.014, 95% CI = 1.107–8.204) and TMD in female participants (OR = 2.938, 95% CI = 1.340–6.445) were significant risk factors for >30 UPI scores. Students requiring treatment for TMD were at risk of obtaining >30 UPI scores. Although our study has several limitations, students with subjective symptoms (e.g., disturbance in opening the mouth) should take the UPI test or in some cases consult mental health professionals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)

Other

Jump to: Editorial, Research

9 pages, 1671 KiB  
Case Report
Swallowing Functions after Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy with Loose Fixation for Mandibular Prognathism: A Retrospective Case Series Research
by Kei-ichiro Miura, Masashi Yoshida, Satoshi Rokutanda, Takamitsu Koga and Masahiro Umeda
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 1926; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20031926 - 20 Jan 2023
Viewed by 2268
Abstract
Sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) is a standard surgical technique for patients with mandibular prognathism. However, the appropriate position of the proximal fragment is not strictly defined, and rigid fixation can induce early postoperative skeletal relapse and temporomandibular (TMJ) disorders. Loose fixation can [...] Read more.
Sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) is a standard surgical technique for patients with mandibular prognathism. However, the appropriate position of the proximal fragment is not strictly defined, and rigid fixation can induce early postoperative skeletal relapse and temporomandibular (TMJ) disorders. Loose fixation can be expected to seat the proximal bone fragments in a physiologically appropriate position, thereby reducing adverse events. Although long-term skeletal stability has been achieved using SSRO without fixation, the evaluation of preoperative and postoperative eating and swallowing functions remains unclear, and this study aimed to clarify this point. We evaluated mastication time, oral transfer time, and pharyngeal transfer time using videofluorography (VF) preoperatively, two months postoperatively, and six months postoperatively, and along with the position of anatomical landmarks using cephalometric radiographs, modified water swallowing test (MWST), food test (FT), and repetitive saliva swallowing test (RSST) were used to evaluate postoperative swallowing function. Four patients (one male, three females; mean (range) age 26.5 (18–51) years) were included, with a mean setback of 9.5 mm and 6.5 mm on the right and left sides, respectively. Postoperative eating and swallowing functions were good in VF, cephalometric analysis, MWST, FT, and RSST. In the present study, good results for postoperative eating and swallowing functions were obtained in SSRO with loose fixation of the proximal and distal bone segments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
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10 pages, 6076 KiB  
Case Report
Two Cases of Temporomandibular Synovial Chondromatosis Associated with Gli1 Gene Mutation
by Taeko Fukutani, Shigeaki Toratani, Taku Kanda, Kensaku Matsui, Sachiko Yamasaki, Kensaku Sumi, Ikuko Ogawa and Souichi Yanamoto
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(8), 4702; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084702 - 13 Apr 2022
Viewed by 2198
Abstract
Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a rare benign disease involving multifocal generation of ectopic cartilage in the synovial tissue. Herein, we report two cases of SC in the temporomandibular joint: a 38-year-old woman (patient 1) and 39-year-old woman (patient 2). Both patients had trismus, [...] Read more.
Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a rare benign disease involving multifocal generation of ectopic cartilage in the synovial tissue. Herein, we report two cases of SC in the temporomandibular joint: a 38-year-old woman (patient 1) and 39-year-old woman (patient 2). Both patients had trismus, jaw joint noises, and jaw-opening pain in the temporomandibular joint. Cone-beam computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patient 1 showed multiple calcified loose bodies around the right mandibular condyle. In addition, CT and MRI in patient 2 showed multiple calcified loose bodies around the left mandibular condyle and temporal bone perforation. Following establishing a diagnosis of SC, both patients underwent tumor resection via open surgery. In immunohistochemical examinations of the resected tissues, tumor cells showed intense nuclear staining with labeled anti-Gli1 antibody. Gene sequencing revealed that both patients had a homozygous mutation in the Gli1 gene (rs2228226 G>C). In conclusion, we suggest that the Gli1 gene (rs2228226 G>C) may be involved in the etiology of SC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art of Oral Health in Japan and Other Aging Countries)
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