Special Issue "Diagnosis and Management of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) during the COVID-19 Pandemic"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Cardiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jose Medina-Inojosa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Preventive Cardiology, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic Rochester, USA
Interests: preventive cardiology; epidemiology; cardiovascular health; cardiovascular risk prediction; cardiovascular rehabilitation; rehabilitation medicine; atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk; body volume measurement; body composition; obesity; artificial intelligence

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

As we know, COVID-19 reached pandemic levels in March 2020, resulting in almost 60 million confirmed cases and over 1.41 million deaths as of November 25, 2020. This has not only pushed the capacities of public health services, but has also radically changed how medical care is provided, making it essential to reorganize and adapt health systems across various specialties in order to prioritize and individualize patient care as necessary.

Patients with pre-existing cardiovascular diseases and risk factors (such as obesity, hypertension, and diabetes) have increased severity and mortality during SARS-CoV-2 infection compared to these comorbidities individually. It is suggested that a combined effect of these comorbidities may play a key role, as these conditions share several standard features with infectious disorders, including a chronic pro-inflammatory state and the attenuation of the innate immune response, which may make individuals more susceptible to disease complications. For example, severe obesity (BMI≥35 kg/mt2), is one of the comorbidities most related to admissions (i.e., hospitalization or ICU) and fatalities; however, the pathophysiological mechanism explaining the associations between obesity and fatal and non-fatal outcomes in COVID patients are not fully understood.

Several demographic and clinical characteristics are significant predictors of hospitalization and severe outcomes. COVID-19 disproportionately affects the African American and Hispanic populations, who have high rates of comorbid conditions and obesity. Regarding gender, male sex (at age 60 years or older) has shown a trend toward a higher risk of fatal outcomes in COVID-19 patients. With effective novel therapeutics and vaccines on the horizon, the direct and indirect consequences of COVID-19 continue to strain the practice of cardiovascular medicine. Understanding the current and future impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on public health, patient care, cardiovascular management, and outcomes for patients with and without underlying cardiovascular diseases and risk factors is of the utmost importance. In this Special Issue, we welcome a diverse array of submissions that will increase the knowledge on the topic.

Dr. Jose Medina-Inojosa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19 Pandemic
  • Public Health
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Cardiovascular Risk Factors
  • Cardiovascular Outcomes
  • Cardiovascular Manangement
  • Diversity
  • Vaccines
  • Therapeutics
  • Obesity
  • Multi-Morbidity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Spectrum of COVID-19-Associated Myocarditis: A Patient-Tailored Multidisciplinary Approach
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(9), 1974; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10091974 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 286
Abstract
Background. Myocarditis lacks systematic characterization in COVID-19 patients. Methods. We enrolled consecutive patients with newly diagnosed myocarditis in the context of COVID-19 infection. Diagnostic and treatment strategies were driven by a dedicated multidisciplinary disease unit for myocarditis. Multimodal outcomes were assessed during prospective [...] Read more.
Background. Myocarditis lacks systematic characterization in COVID-19 patients. Methods. We enrolled consecutive patients with newly diagnosed myocarditis in the context of COVID-19 infection. Diagnostic and treatment strategies were driven by a dedicated multidisciplinary disease unit for myocarditis. Multimodal outcomes were assessed during prospective follow-up. Results. Seven consecutive patients (57% males, age 51 ± 9 y) with acute COVID-19 infection received a de novo diagnosis of myocarditis. Endomyocardial biopsy was of choice in hemodynamically unstable patients (n = 4, mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 25 ± 9%), whereas cardiac magnetic resonance constituted the first exam in stable patients (n = 3, mean LVEF 48 ± 10%). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed an intra-myocardial SARS-CoV-2 genome in one of the six cases undergoing biopsy: in the remaining patients, myocarditis was either due to other viruses (n = 2) or virus-negative (n = 3). Hemodynamic support was needed for four unstable patients (57%), whereas a cardiac device implant was chosen in two of four cases showing ventricular arrhythmias. Medical treatment included immunosuppression (43%) and biological therapy (29%). By the 6-month median follow-up, no patient died or experienced malignant arrhythmias. However, two cases (29%) were screened for heart transplantation. Conclusions. Myocarditis associated with acute COVID-19 infection is a spectrum of clinical manifestations and underlying etiologies. A multidisciplinary approach is the cornerstone for tailored management. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Home Management of Heart Failure and Arrhythmias in Patients with Cardiac Devices during Pandemic
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(8), 1618; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10081618 - 11 Apr 2021
Viewed by 338
Abstract
Background: The in-hospital management of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) changed early in the COVID-19 pandemic. Routine in-hospital controls of CIEDs were converted into remote home monitoring (HM). The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of the lockdown [...] Read more.
Background: The in-hospital management of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) changed early in the COVID-19 pandemic. Routine in-hospital controls of CIEDs were converted into remote home monitoring (HM). The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of the lockdown period on CIEDs patients and its influence on in-hospital admissions through the analysis of HM data. Methods: We analysed data recorded from 312 patients with HM during the national quarantine related to COVID-19 and then compared data from the same period of 2019. Results: We observed a reduction in the number of HM events in 2020 when compared to 2019. Non-sustained ventricular tachycardia episodes decreased (18.3% vs. 9.9% p = 0.002) as well as atrial fibrillation episodes (29.2% vs. 22.4% p = 0.019). In contrast, heart failure (HF) alarm activation was lower in 2019 than in 2020 (17% vs. 25.3% p = 0.012). Hospital admissions for critical events recorded with CIEDs dropped in 2020, including those for HF. Conclusions: HM, combined with telemedicine use, has ensured the surveillance of CIED patients. In 2020, arrhythmic events and hospital admissions decreased significantly compared to 2019. Moreover, in 2020, patients with HF arrived in hospital in a worse clinical condition compared to previous months. Full article
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