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Special Issue "Cartilage Repair and Restorative Procedures"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Orthopedics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Giuseppe Filardo

Applied and Translational Research Center, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, 40136, Bologna, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cartilage; osteochondral; knee; scaffold; injectives
Guest Editor
Dr. Laura de Girolamo

Orthopaedic Biotechnology Laboratory, IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopaedic Institute, Via R. Galeazzi 4, 20161 Milano, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: regenerative medicine; mesenchymal stem cells; cartilage; tendon

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Articular chondral lesions are a common cause of disability, often associated with pain, a reduction of joint mobility, and a loss of function, and may predispose patients to osteoarthritis, which entails a huge social impact. It is well known that articular cartilage has a very limited capacity for self-repair, because of the intrinsic biological features of this tissue; this makes cartilage lesions still a major challenge for orthopaedic surgeons and researchers. Although the last decades have brought several improvements in this field, such as the understanding of the subchondral involvement in many of these lesions, the extension of treatment indications not only to focal traumatic cases, and the documentation of the outcome of both traditional treatments and more ambitious regenerative strategies, the clinical results are still only partially satisfactory. In this light, there is a need to develop more effective treatment options, to be translated and tested in the clinical practice, as well to understand the best indications for such treatments in the light of their results over time. We, therefore, welcome the submission of studies focusing on “Cartilage Repair and Restorative Procedures”, from preclinical and early experiences of new treatments, to the definition of potential limitations, up to a long-term follow-up of both traditional and new approaches, as well as studies aimed at identifying the responders and factors that might help to improve the management of patients affected by cartilage lesions.

Dr. Giuseppe Filardo
Dr. Laura de Girolamo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cartilage
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Osteochondral
  • Scaffold
  • Injective treatments

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Human Diseased Articular Cartilage Contains a Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Like Population of Chondroprogenitors with Strong Immunomodulatory Responses
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(4), 423; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8040423
Received: 22 February 2019 / Revised: 21 March 2019 / Accepted: 25 March 2019 / Published: 28 March 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (36789 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Background: osteoarthritic human articular cartilage (AC)-derived cartilage cells (CCs) with same-donor bone marrow (BMSCs) and adipose tissue (ASCs)-derived mesenchymal stem cells were compared, in terms of stemness features, and secretory and immunomodulatory responses to inflammation. Methods: proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) presence was evaluated in [...] Read more.
Background: osteoarthritic human articular cartilage (AC)-derived cartilage cells (CCs) with same-donor bone marrow (BMSCs) and adipose tissue (ASCs)-derived mesenchymal stem cells were compared, in terms of stemness features, and secretory and immunomodulatory responses to inflammation. Methods: proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) presence was evaluated in AC and CCs. MSCs and CCs (n = 8) were cultured (P1 to P4) and characterized for clonogenicity, nanog homeobox (NANOG), and POU class 5 homeobox 1 (POU5F1) expression, immunotypification, and tri-lineage differentiation. Their basal and interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-stimulated expression of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors (TIMPs), release of growth factors, and cytokines were analyzed, along with the immunomodulatory ability of CCs. Results: PRG4 was mainly expressed in the intact AC surface, whereas shifted to the intermediate zone in damaged cartilage and increased its expression in CCs upon culture. All cells exhibited a similar phenotype and stemness maintenance over passages. CCs showed highest chondrogenic ability, no adipogenic potential, a superior basal secretion of growth factors and cytokines, the latter further increased after inflammatory stimulation, and an immunomodulatory behavior. All stimulated cells shared an increased MMP expression without a corresponding TIMP production. Conclusion: based on the observed features, CCs obtained from pathological joints may constitute a potential tissue-specific therapeutic target or agent to improve damaged cartilage healing, especially damage caused by inflammatory/immune mediated conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cartilage Repair and Restorative Procedures)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC) and AMIC Enhanced by Autologous Concentrated Bone Marrow Aspirate (BMAC) Allow for Stable Clinical and Functional Improvements at up to 9 Years Follow-Up: Results from a Randomized Controlled Study
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(3), 392; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8030392
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 12 March 2019 / Accepted: 15 March 2019 / Published: 21 March 2019
PDF Full-text (3146 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aims of the study were to evaluate long-term outcomes after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) in the treatment of focal chondral lesions and to assess the possible improvements given by the combination of this technique with bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC). Twenty-four patients [...] Read more.
The aims of the study were to evaluate long-term outcomes after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) in the treatment of focal chondral lesions and to assess the possible improvements given by the combination of this technique with bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC). Twenty-four patients (age range 18–55 years) affected by focal knee chondral lesions were treated with standard AMIC or AMIC enhanced by BMAC (AMIC+). Pain (Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)) and functional scores (Lysholm, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Tegner, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)) were collected pre-operatively and then at 6, 12, 24, 60, and 100 months after treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation was performed pre-operatively and at 6, 12, and 24 months follow-ups. Patients treated with AMIC+ showed higher Lysholm scores (p = 0.015) and lower VAS (p = 0.011) in comparison with patients in the standard AMIC group at the 12 months follow-up. Both treatments allowed for functional and pain improvements with respect to pre-operative levels lasting up to 100 months. MRI revealed consistent cartilage repair at 24 months in both groups. This study shows that AMIC and AMIC+ are effective treatments for focal chondral lesions with beneficial effect lasting up to 9 years. AMIC+ allows for faster recovery from injury, and is thus more indicated for patients requiring a prompt return to activity. Level of evidence: II, randomized controlled trial in an explorative cohort. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cartilage Repair and Restorative Procedures)
Figures

Figure 1

J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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