Special Issue "Insect Vector-Focused Approaches for Disease Control"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Pest and Vector Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Karin Kirchgatter
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Superintendencia de Controle de Endemias, CEP 05403-000 Sao Paulo, Brazil
Interests: plasmodium; avian malaria; phylogenetic diversity; vector borne disease; morphometry; mosquitoes; DNA barcoding
Dr. Adriano Pinter
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Superintendencia de Controle de Endemias, CEP 05403-000 Sao Paulo, Brazil
Interests: amblyomma scultpum; amblyomma aureolatum; spotted fever; vector-borne-diseases; rickettsia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Vector-borne diseases are a major issue in tropical countries. Global climate and landscape changes may be directly associated with territorial expansion and severe outbreaks of the neglected tropical diseases associated with different vector species. Mosquitos, phlebotomines, biting midges, ticks, lice, and fleas are amongst the main vector groups associated with tropical diseases dissemination. Integrated vector-borne disease control is compounded by several strategies. Studies about the biology and ecology of vector arthropods, detection of pathogenic agents, vectorial competence and capacity determination, population control, surveillance strategies and several other topics are of major importance for compounding a complete control approach, and studies on this subject must be encouraged.

Dr. Karin Kirchgatter
Dr. Adriano Pinter
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • medical entomology
  • arthropods
  • mosquitos
  • diptera
  • vector biology
  • vector genetics
  • bioinformatics
  • computational biology
  • parasitology
  • arboviruses
  • disease control
  • disease surveillance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Isolation and Characterization of Mosquito-Associated Spiroplasma cantharicola from Aedes japonicus Collected in Hokkaido, Japan
Insects 2021, 12(12), 1056; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12121056 - 25 Nov 2021
Viewed by 206
Abstract
Species of the genus Spiroplasma are common within arthropods and plants worldwide. Mosquito-associated Spiroplasma spp. have been reported to show pathogenicity toward mosquitoes, which serve as vectors of several infectious diseases that have detrimental effects on public health. Although Spiroplasma spp. are expected [...] Read more.
Species of the genus Spiroplasma are common within arthropods and plants worldwide. Mosquito-associated Spiroplasma spp. have been reported to show pathogenicity toward mosquitoes, which serve as vectors of several infectious diseases that have detrimental effects on public health. Although Spiroplasma spp. are expected to have potential use as biological vector-control tools, characteristics such as their distribution, host species, and cytopathogenic effects (CPEs) are not well understood. In this study, we isolated a Spiroplasma sp. from a female Aedes japonicus collected in Hokkaido, northern Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated our isolate was closely related to S. cantharicola. We screened 103 mosquito pools consisting of 3 genera and 9 species, but only detected S. cantharicola in the first isolation. In an in vitro assay, our isolate grew well at 28 °C, but no propagation was observed at 37 °C. Furthermore, the isolate showed strong CPE on a mosquito-derived cultured cell line (C6/36), and its propagation slightly increased when co-cultured with C6/36 cells. To our knowledge, this is the third report of the isolation of S. cantharicola from mosquitoes and the first case in Asia. Our findings provide epidemiological data on S. cantharicola distribution in the region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Vector-Focused Approaches for Disease Control)
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Article
Updating Ecological and Behavioral Aspects of the Sandfly Fauna in the Vale do Ribeira Region, São Paulo State, Brazil
Insects 2021, 12(11), 988; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12110988 - 02 Nov 2021
Viewed by 338
Abstract
Some ecological parameters and the distribution of vectors in the municipality of Eldorado, Vale do Ribeira Region, São Paulo, were studied. Entomological surveys were carried out from September 2019 to March 2021. It was observed that a few ecological parameters, including richness, abundance, [...] Read more.
Some ecological parameters and the distribution of vectors in the municipality of Eldorado, Vale do Ribeira Region, São Paulo, were studied. Entomological surveys were carried out from September 2019 to March 2021. It was observed that a few ecological parameters, including richness, abundance, diversity, and equitability, were typical of a modified environment, where artificial ecotopes maintain the presence of sandflies throughout the year. A total of 11,668 sandflies were captured. The presence of five taxa were observed in Eldorado, with low diversity and high dominance of Nyssomyia intermedia next to Ny. neivai, which are sympatric species. The results presented reinforce the importance of these species in anthropized areas in the transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) agents and the need for entomological monitoring. Psathyromyia pascalei was encountered for the first time in the municipality, expanding the known area of distribution of this species in a modified environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Vector-Focused Approaches for Disease Control)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Control of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever by Integrated Suppression of Rhipicephalus sanguineus in a Community in Sonora, MX, with Corresponding Vector Population and Disease Model, and Predicted Optimal Combinations of Treatment
Authors: Gerardo Alvarez Hernandez, Vardayani Ratti, Michael Teglas, Alex Villegas Trejo and Dorothy Wallace
Affiliation: Universidad de Sonora; California State University, Chico; University of Nevada, Reno; Servicios de Salud, Sinaloa; Dartmouth College
Abstract: Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) is a significant health problem in Sonora, Mexico. The tick vector, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, feeds almost exclusively on domestic dogs that also serve as the reservoir for the tick-borne pathogen, Rickettsia rickettsii. After an outbreak of RMSF in a rural community near the Sonora state capital of Hermosillo, a test area was treated with a combination of insecticidal dog collars and long-lasting insecticidal wall paint from March 2018 to April 2019 with subsequent reduction in RMSF cases and deaths. An estimated 80% of the dogs in the area had collars applied and 15% of the houses were treated. A process-based model of the life cycle and disease transmission of R. sanguineus was developed to predict what treatment combinations will result in disease suppression and identify other combinations of these treatments leading to a successful intervention.

Title: Isolation and characterization of mosquito-associated Spiroplasma cantharicola from Aedes japonicus collected in Hokkaido, Japan
Authors: Makoto Shimooka, Yoshimi Sakurai, Yasukazu Muramatsu and Leo Uchida*
Affiliation: Laboratory of Zoonotic Diseases, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501, Japan
Abstract: Species of the genus Spiroplasma are common within arthropods and plants worldwide. Mosquito-associated Spiroplasma spp. have been reported to show pathogenicity towards mosquitoes, which serve as vectors of several infectious diseases that have detrimental effects on public health. Although Spiroplasma spp. are expected to have potential use as biological vector-control tools, characteristics such as their distribution, host species, and cytopathogenic effects (CPE) are not well understood. In this study, we isolated a Spiroplasma sp. from a female Aedes japonicus collected in Hokkaido, northern Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated our isolate was closely related to S. cantharicola. We screened 103 mosquito pools consisting of three genera and eight species, but only detected S. cantharicola in the first isolation. In an in vitro assay, our isolate grew well at 28°C, but no propagation was observed at 37°C. Furthermore, the isolate showed strong CPE on a mosquito-derived cultured cell line (C6/36), and its propagation slightly increased when co-cultured with C6/36 cells. To our knowledge, this is the third report of the isolation of S. cantharicola from mosquitoes and the first case in Asia. Our findings provide epidemiological data on S. cantharicola distribution in the region.

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