Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Molecular Biology and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2023) | Viewed by 37864

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, NARO, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8517, Japan
Interests: entomology; bioinformatics; genome data analysis; trancriptomics; molecular biology; immunology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, NARO, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8517, Japan
Interests: bioinformatics; sociogenomics; genome editing; transcriptome analysis; functional genomics; evolutionary biology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, NARO, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8517, Japan
Interests: bioinformatics; genome analysis; transcriptome analysis; genome databases; insecticide resistance

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School of Integrated Sciences for Life, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-0046, Japan
Interests: bioinformatics; biological databases; genome editing; genome sequencing; sequence analysis; transcriptome analysis; functional genomics; hypoxia; oxidative stress
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue (SI) considers manuscripts related to insect genome data (including related methods, such as metagenome or RADseq data) and transcriptome data through next-generation sequencing (NGS) for publication. To ensure data availability, raw sequence data must be registered in the international nucleotide sequence databases, namely, NCBI, DDBJ, and ENA, and submitted Supplementary Information data must be assigned a DOI using a data repository (e.g., figshare).

This SI also considers manuscripts of metadata analysis. As mentioned above, an enormous amount of insect genome and transcriptome data are in public databases. Thus, novel approaches using these data can provide new knowledge contributing to molecular biology and evolutionary biology.

It is our hope that this SI will contribute to the progress of entomology.

Dr. Kakeru Yokoi
Dr. Yudai Masuoka
Dr. Akiya Jouraku
Prof. Dr. Hidemasa Bono
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • entomology
  • next-generation sequencing (NGS)
  • transcriptome data
  • genome data analysis
  • data science
  • metadata analysis

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 4301 KiB  
Article
Interaction Analysis of lncRNA and mRNA Based on the Full-Length Transcriptome of the Nymph-to-Adult Developmental Transition of Sogatella furcifera
by Zeyan Jia, Xibin Yang, Hong Yang, Renhuai Dai, Qinghui Zeng and Daochao Jin
Insects 2023, 14(4), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects14040308 - 23 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1237
Abstract
Little is known on how long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and mRNAs cooperatively participate in regulating the nymph-to-adult development transition of Sogatella furcifera. Herein, lncRNA and mRNA libraries were constructed in three different developmental stages of S. furcifera, namely, prior to (PE), [...] Read more.
Little is known on how long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and mRNAs cooperatively participate in regulating the nymph-to-adult development transition of Sogatella furcifera. Herein, lncRNA and mRNA libraries were constructed in three different developmental stages of S. furcifera, namely, prior to (PE), during (DE), and after (AE) ecdysis. Overall, 4649 lncRNAs were identified and divided into intergenic (53.90%), intronic (1.33%), sense (8.99%), antisense (21.75%), and bidirectional (3.94%) lncRNAs. Moreover, 795 differentially expressed lncRNAs were identified. Specifically, upon comparing PE and DE, 2719 target mRNAs were predicted for 574 lncRNAs. Upon comparing PE and AE, 2816 target mRNAs were predicted for 627 lncRNAs. Finally, upon comparing DE and AE, 51 target mRNAs were predicted for 35 lncRNAs. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome functional enrichment analysis revealed that the target genes of 795 lncRNAs were enriched in metabolic pathways, amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism. Subsequently, interaction analysis indicated that MSTRG.16086.1, MSTRG.16087.1, and MSTRG.2447.1 were functionally associated with cuticle protein and chitin biosynthesis. Finally, 11 differentially expressed lncRNAs were significantly enriched in 3rd and 4th instar nymphs. Our findings suggest that lncRNAs play a critical regulatory role during the molting of S. furcifera. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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18 pages, 2690 KiB  
Article
Genome Assembly and Comparative Analysis of the Egg Parasitoid Wasp Trichogramma dendrolimi Shed Light on the Composition and Evolution of Olfactory Receptors and Venoms
by Xue Zhang, Zhuo Jiang, Xilin Jiao, Yang Yu, Zhenan Wang, Yangyang Hou, Guohua Duan, Wenmei Du, Changchun Ruan, Junjie Zhang and Ying Hu
Insects 2023, 14(2), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects14020144 - 31 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1728
Abstract
Trichogramma dendrolimi is one of the most successfully industrialized Trichogramma species used to control agricultural and forestry pests in China. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its host recognition and parasitism remain largely unknown, partially due to the limited genome information of this parasitoid [...] Read more.
Trichogramma dendrolimi is one of the most successfully industrialized Trichogramma species used to control agricultural and forestry pests in China. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its host recognition and parasitism remain largely unknown, partially due to the limited genome information of this parasitoid wasp. Here, we present a high-quality de novo assembly of T. dendrolimi through a combination of Illumina and PacBio sequencing technologies. The final assembly had a length of 215.2 Mb and contains 316 scaffolds with a scaffold N50 size of 1.41 Mb. Repetitive sequences with a length of 63.4 Mb and 12,785 protein-coding genes were identified. Significantly expanded gene families were identified to be involved in the development and regulatory processes, while remarkably contracted gene families were involved in the transport processes in T. dendrolimi. The olfactory and venom-associated genes were identified in T. dendrolimi and 24 other hymenopteran species, using uniform methods combining BLAST and HMM profiling. The identified venom genes of T. dendrolimi were enriched in antioxidant activity, tricarboxylic acid cycle, response to oxidative stress and cell redox homeostasis. Our study provides an important resource for comparative genomics and functional studies to interpret the molecular mechanisms underlying host recognition and parasitism of Trichogramma species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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14 pages, 1352 KiB  
Article
Best Practices for Comprehensive Annotation of Neuropeptides of Gryllus bimaculatus
by Takako Mochizuki, Mika Sakamoto, Yasuhiro Tanizawa, Hitomi Seike, Zhen Zhu, Yi Jun Zhou, Keisuke Fukumura, Shinji Nagata and Yasukazu Nakamura
Insects 2023, 14(2), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects14020121 - 25 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1788
Abstract
Genome annotation is critically important data that can support research. Draft genome annotations cover representative genes; however, they often do not include genes that are expressed only in limited tissues and stages, or genes with low expression levels. Neuropeptides are responsible for regulation [...] Read more.
Genome annotation is critically important data that can support research. Draft genome annotations cover representative genes; however, they often do not include genes that are expressed only in limited tissues and stages, or genes with low expression levels. Neuropeptides are responsible for regulation of various physiological and biological processes. A recent study disclosed the genome draft of the two-spotted cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which was utilized to understand the intriguing physiology and biology of crickets. Thus far, only two of the nine reported neuropeptides in G. bimaculatus were annotated in the draft genome. Even though de novo assembly using transcriptomic analyses can comprehensively identify neuropeptides, this method does not follow those annotations on the genome locus. In this study, we performed the annotations based on the reference mapping, de novo transcriptome assembly, and manual curation. Consequently, we identified 41 neuropeptides out of 43 neuropeptides, which were reported in the insects. Further, 32 of the identified neuropeptides on the genomic loci in G. bimaculatus were annotated. The present annotation methods can be applicable for the neuropeptide annotation of other insects. Furthermore, the methods will help to generate useful infrastructures for studies relevant to neuropeptides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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12 pages, 12701 KiB  
Article
Selection and Comparative Gene Expression of Midgut-Specific Targets for Drosophila suzukii
by June-Sun Yoon, Seung-Joon Ahn and Man-Yeon Choi
Insects 2023, 14(1), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects14010076 - 12 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2863
Abstract
Spotted-wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is a destructive and invasive pest that attacks most small fruits and cherries. The current management for SWD involves the use of conventional insecticides. In an effort to develop a biologically based control option, the application of [...] Read more.
Spotted-wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is a destructive and invasive pest that attacks most small fruits and cherries. The current management for SWD involves the use of conventional insecticides. In an effort to develop a biologically based control option, the application of RNA interference (RNAi) has been investigated. To develop an RNAi approach, suitable targets must be identified, and an efficient delivery method must be developed for introducing the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in the midgut. In D. suzukii, we previously found that dsRNA nucleases actively degrade dsRNA molecules in the midgut. In this study, we focused on identifying biological targets focused on the midgut membrane. The profile of midgut-specific genes was analyzed and compared with the genes expressed in the whole-body using transcriptome analysis. Differential gene expression analysis revealed that 1921 contigs were upregulated and 1834 contigs were downregulated in the midgut when compared to genes from other body tissues. We chose ten midgut-specifically upregulated genes and empirically confirmed their expressions. We are particularly interested in the midgut membrane proteins, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as diuretic hormone 31 (DH31) receptor, neuropeptide F (NPF) recepror, toll-9, adhesion receptors, methuselah (mth), and gustatory receptor, because insect GPCRs have been offered great potential for next-generation pest management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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19 pages, 6413 KiB  
Article
Multi-Omics Reveals the Effect of Population Density on the Phenotype, Transcriptome and Metabolome of Mythimna separata
by Sibo Wang, Hongjia Yang, Yushuo Hu, Chunyu Zhang and Dong Fan
Insects 2023, 14(1), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects14010068 - 10 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1570
Abstract
Population-density-dependent polymorphism is important in the biology of some agricultural pests. The oriental armyworm (Mythimna separata) is a lepidopteran pest (family Noctuidae). As the population density increases, its body color becomes darker, and the insect eats more and causes greater damage [...] Read more.
Population-density-dependent polymorphism is important in the biology of some agricultural pests. The oriental armyworm (Mythimna separata) is a lepidopteran pest (family Noctuidae). As the population density increases, its body color becomes darker, and the insect eats more and causes greater damage to crops. The molecular mechanisms underlying this phase change are not fully clear. Here, we used transcriptomic and metabolomic methods to study the effect of population density on the differentiation of second-day sixth instar M. separata larvae. The transcriptomic analysis identified 1148 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in gregarious-type (i.e., high-population-density) armyworms compared with solitary-type (low-population-density) armyworms; 481 and 667 genes were up- and downregulated, respectively. The metabolomic analysis identified 137 differentially accumulated metabolites (DAMs), including 59 upregulated and 78 downregulated. The analysis of DEGs and DAMs showed that activation of the insulin-like signaling pathway promotes the melanization of gregarious armyworms and accelerates the decomposition of saccharides, which promotes the gregarious type to take in more food. The gregarious type is more capable of digesting and absorbing proteins and decreases energy consumption by inhibiting transcription and translation processes. The phase change traits of the armyworm are thus attributable to plasticity of its energy metabolism. These data broaden our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of insect-density-dependent polymorphism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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14 pages, 1488 KiB  
Article
Transcriptomic Analyses Suggest the Adaptation of Bumblebees to High Altitudes
by Chengbo Liang, Daoxin Liu, Pengfei Song, Yuantao Zhou, Hongyan Yu, Guo Sun, Xiaoxuan Ma and Jingyan Yan
Insects 2022, 13(12), 1173; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects13121173 - 17 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1323
Abstract
Determining the adaptive mechanisms by which bumblebees adapt to high altitudes can help us to better understand their distribution, providing a basis for the future protection and utilization of bumblebee resources. For this study, the adaptive mechanisms of two dominant bumblebee species in [...] Read more.
Determining the adaptive mechanisms by which bumblebees adapt to high altitudes can help us to better understand their distribution, providing a basis for the future protection and utilization of bumblebee resources. For this study, the adaptive mechanisms of two dominant bumblebee species in the northeastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau—Bombus kashmirensis and B. waltoni—were studied through transcriptomics methods. For each species, enrichment analysis of the differentially expressed genes and gene set enrichment analysis were carried out between samples collected at different altitudes (4000 m, 4500 m, and 5000 m). The results indicate that these bumblebees tend to up-regulate energy metabolism-related genes when facing extremely high-altitude environments. Of the enriched pathways up-regulated in higher altitudes, the pentose and glucuronate interconversions pathway presented the most severe up-regulation in multiple comparisons of different altitudes for B. kashmirensis, as well as the AMPK signaling pathway, which was found to be up-regulated in both species. Notably, limited by the extreme hypoxic conditions in this study, oxidative phosphorylation was found to be down-regulated with increasing altitude, which is uncommon in studies on bumblebee adaptation to high altitudes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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15 pages, 1237 KiB  
Article
Reference Genome Sequences of the Oriental Armyworm, Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)
by Kakeru Yokoi, Seiichi Furukawa, Rui Zhou, Akiya Jouraku and Hidemasa Bono
Insects 2022, 13(12), 1172; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects13121172 - 17 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2169
Abstract
Lepidopteran insects are an important group of animals, including those used as biochemical and physiological model species in the insect and silk industries as well as others that are major agricultural pests. Therefore, the genome sequences of several lepidopteran insects have been reported. [...] Read more.
Lepidopteran insects are an important group of animals, including those used as biochemical and physiological model species in the insect and silk industries as well as others that are major agricultural pests. Therefore, the genome sequences of several lepidopteran insects have been reported. The oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata, is an agricultural pest commonly used to study insect immune reactions and interactions with parasitoid wasps as hosts. To improve our understanding of these research topics, reference genome sequences were constructed in the present study. Using long-read and short-read sequence data, de novo assembly and polishing were performed and haplotigs were purged. Subsequently, gene predictions and functional annotations were performed. To search for orthologs of the Toll and Immune Deficiency (IMD) pathways and for C-type lectins, annotation data analysis, BLASTp, and Hummer scans were performed. The M. separata genome is 682 Mbp; its contig N50 was 2.7 Mbp, with 21,970 genes and 24,452 coding sites predicted. All orthologs of the core components of the Toll and IMD pathways and 105 C-type lectins were identified. These results suggest that the genome data were of sufficient quality for use as reference genome data and could contribute to promoting M. separata and lepidopteran research at the molecular and genome levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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18 pages, 4203 KiB  
Article
Comparative Transcriptome Analysis to Reveal Differentially Expressed Cytochrome P450 in Response to Imidacloprid in the Aphid Lion, Chrysoperla zastrowi sillemi (Esben-Petersen)
by Jyoti Pathak, Gandhi Gracy Ramasamy, Aditi Agrawal, Subhi Srivastava, Bhusangar Raghavendra Basavaarya, Mohan Muthugounder, Venugopal Kundalagurki Muniyappa, Pratheepa Maria, Anil Rai and Thiruvengadam Venkatesan
Insects 2022, 13(10), 900; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects13100900 - 03 Oct 2022
Viewed by 2132
Abstract
The aphid lion, Chrysoperla zastrowi sillemi (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) is a highly effective beneficial predator of many agricultural pests and has developed resistance to several insecticides. Understanding the molecular mechanism of insecticide resistance in the predators is crucial for its effective application in IPM [...] Read more.
The aphid lion, Chrysoperla zastrowi sillemi (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) is a highly effective beneficial predator of many agricultural pests and has developed resistance to several insecticides. Understanding the molecular mechanism of insecticide resistance in the predators is crucial for its effective application in IPM programs. Therefore, transcriptomes of imidacloprid-resistant and susceptible strains have been assessed using RNA-seq. Cytochrome P450 is one of the important gene families involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Hence, our study focused on the CYP gene family where mining, nomenclature, and phylogenetic analysis revealed a total of 95 unique CYP genes with considerable expansion in CYP3 and CYP4 clans. Further, differential gene expression (DGE) analysis revealed ten CYP genes from CYP3 and CYP4 clans to be differentially expressed, out of which nine genes (CYP4419A1, CYP4XK1, CYP4416A10, CYP4416A-fragment8, CYP6YL1, CYP6YH6, CYP9GK-fragment16, CYP9GN2, CYP9GK6) were downregulated and one (CYP9GK3) was upregulated in the resistant strain as compared to the susceptible strain. Expression validation by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is consistent with the DGE results. The expansion and differential expression of CYP genes may be an indicator of the capacity of the predator to detoxify a particular group of insecticides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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10 pages, 936 KiB  
Article
Cytochrome P450 Genes Expressed in Phasmatodea Midguts
by Matan Shelomi
Insects 2022, 13(10), 873; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects13100873 - 26 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1449
Abstract
Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are xenobiotic detoxification genes found in most eukaryotes, and linked in insects to the tolerance of plant secondary chemicals and insecticide resistance. The number and diversity of CYP clans, families, and subfamilies that an organism produces could correlate [...] Read more.
Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are xenobiotic detoxification genes found in most eukaryotes, and linked in insects to the tolerance of plant secondary chemicals and insecticide resistance. The number and diversity of CYP clans, families, and subfamilies that an organism produces could correlate with its dietary breadth or specialization. This study examined the CYP diversity expressed in the midguts of six species of folivorous stick insects (Phasmatodea), to identify their CYP complement and see if any CYPs correlate with diet toxicity or specialization, and see what factors influenced their evolution in this insect order. CYP genes were mined from six published Phasmatodea transcriptomes and analyzed phylogenetically. The Phasmatodea CYP complement resembles that of other insects, though with relatively low numbers, and with significant expansions in the CYP clades 6J1, 6A13/14, 4C1, and 15A1. The CYP6 group is known to be the dominant CYP family in insects, but most insects have no more than one CYP15 gene, so the function of the multiple CYP15A1 genes in Phasmatodea is unknown, with neofunctionalization following gene duplication hypothesized. No correlation was found between CYPs and diet specialization or toxicity, with some CYP clades expanding within the Phasmatodea and others likely inherited from a common ancestor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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10 pages, 907 KiB  
Article
Meta-Analysis of Transcriptomes in Insects Showing Density-Dependent Polyphenism
by Kouhei Toga, Kakeru Yokoi and Hidemasa Bono
Insects 2022, 13(10), 864; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects13100864 - 23 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 6203
Abstract
With increasing public data, a statistical analysis approach called meta-analysis, which combines transcriptome results obtained from multiple studies, has succeeded in providing novel insights into targeted biological processes. Locusts and aphids are representative of insect groups that exhibit density-dependent plasticity. Although the physiological [...] Read more.
With increasing public data, a statistical analysis approach called meta-analysis, which combines transcriptome results obtained from multiple studies, has succeeded in providing novel insights into targeted biological processes. Locusts and aphids are representative of insect groups that exhibit density-dependent plasticity. Although the physiological mechanisms underlying density-dependent polyphenism have been identified in aphids and locusts, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of public transcriptomes to gain additional insights into the molecular underpinning of density-dependent plasticity. We collected RNA sequencing data of aphids and locusts from public databases and detected differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between crowded and isolated conditions. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed to reveal the characteristics of the DEGs. DNA replication (GO:0006260), DNA metabolic processes (GO:0006259), and mitotic cell cycle (GO:0000278) were enriched in response to crowded conditions. To date, these processes have scarcely been the focus of research. The importance of the oxidative stress response and neurological system modifications under isolated conditions has been highlighted. These biological processes, clarified by meta-analysis, are thought to play key roles in the regulation of density-dependent plasticity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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14 pages, 1072 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Polyadenylation Signal Usage with Full-Length Transcriptome in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)
by Liying Fang, Lina Guo, Min Zhang, Xianchun Li and Zhongyuan Deng
Insects 2022, 13(9), 803; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects13090803 - 02 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1600
Abstract
During the messenger RNA (mRNA) maturation process, RNA polyadenylation is a key step, and is coupled to the termination of transcription. Various cis-acting elements near the cleavage site and their binding factors would affect the process of polyadenylation, and AAUAAA, a highly conserved [...] Read more.
During the messenger RNA (mRNA) maturation process, RNA polyadenylation is a key step, and is coupled to the termination of transcription. Various cis-acting elements near the cleavage site and their binding factors would affect the process of polyadenylation, and AAUAAA, a highly conserved hexamer, was the most important polyadenylation signal (PAS). PAS usage is one of the critical modification determinants targeted at mRNA post-transcription. The full-length transcriptome has recently generated a massive amount of sequencing data, revealing poly(A) variation and alternative polyadenylation (APA) in Spodoptera frugiperda. We identified 50,616 polyadenylation signals in Spodoptera frugiperda via analysis of full-length transcriptome combined with expression Sequence Tags Technology (EST). The polyadenylation signal usage in Spodoptera frugiperda is conserved, and it is similar to that of flies and other animals. AAUAAA and AUUAAA are the most highly conserved polyadenylation signals of all polyadenylation signals we identified. Additionally, we found the U/GU-rich downstream sequence element (DSE) in the cleavage site. These results demonstrate that APA in Spodoptera frugiperda plays a significant role in root growth and development. This is the first polyadenylation signal usage analysis in agricultural pests, which can deepen our understanding of Spodoptera frugiperda and provide a theoretical basis for pest control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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22 pages, 2745 KiB  
Article
Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Early Hemocyte Responses upon In Vivo Stimulation with LPS in the Stick Insect Bacillus rossius (Rossi, 1788)
by Carlotta Bidoli, Andrea Miccoli, Francesco Buonocore, Anna Maria Fausto, Marco Gerdol, Simona Picchietti and Giuseppe Scapigliati
Insects 2022, 13(7), 645; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects13070645 - 18 Jul 2022
Viewed by 1896
Abstract
Despite a growing number of non-model insect species is being investigated in recent years, a greater understanding of their physiology is prevented by the lack of genomic resources. This is the case of the common European stick insect Bacillus rossius (Rossi, 1788): in [...] Read more.
Despite a growing number of non-model insect species is being investigated in recent years, a greater understanding of their physiology is prevented by the lack of genomic resources. This is the case of the common European stick insect Bacillus rossius (Rossi, 1788): in this species, some knowledge is available on hemocyte-related defenses, but little is known about the physiological changes occurring in response to natural or experimental challenges. Here, the transcriptional signatures of adult B. rossius hemocytes were investigated after a short-term (2 h) LPS stimulation in vivo: a total of 2191 differentially expressed genes, mostly involved in proteolysis and carbohydrate and lipid metabolic processes, were identified in the de novo assembled transcriptome and in-depth discussed. Overall, the significant modulation of immune signals—such as C-type lectins, ML domain-containing proteins, serpins, as well as Toll signaling-related molecules—provide novel information on the early progression of LPS-induced responses in B. rossius. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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14 pages, 1191 KiB  
Article
Systematic Functional Annotation Workflow for Insects
by Hidemasa Bono, Takuma Sakamoto, Takeya Kasukawa and Hiroko Tabunoki
Insects 2022, 13(7), 586; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects13070586 - 27 Jun 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4463
Abstract
Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized entomological study, rendering it possible to analyze the genomes and transcriptomes of non-model insects. However, use of this technology is often limited to obtaining the nucleotide sequences of target or related genes, with many of the acquired sequences remaining [...] Read more.
Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized entomological study, rendering it possible to analyze the genomes and transcriptomes of non-model insects. However, use of this technology is often limited to obtaining the nucleotide sequences of target or related genes, with many of the acquired sequences remaining unused because other available sequences are not sufficiently annotated. To address this issue, we have developed a functional annotation workflow for transcriptome-sequenced insects to determine transcript descriptions, which represents a significant improvement over the previous method (functional annotation pipeline for insects). The developed workflow attempts to annotate not only the protein sequences obtained from transcriptome analysis but also the ncRNA sequences obtained simultaneously. In addition, the workflow integrates the expression-level information obtained from transcriptome sequencing for application as functional annotation information. Using the workflow, functional annotation was performed on the sequences obtained from transcriptome sequencing of the stick insect (Entoria okinawaensis) and silkworm (Bombyx mori), yielding richer functional annotation information than that obtained in our previous study. The improved workflow allows the more comprehensive exploitation of transcriptome data and is applicable to other insects because the workflow has been openly developed on GitHub. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Genome and Transcriptome Data)
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