Special Issue "Improving IPM of Specialty Crop Pests and Global Food Security"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Pest and Vector Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Muhammad Haseeb
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Center for Biological Control, College of Agriculture and Food Sciences, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307, USA
Interests: develop pest management strategies for effective management of invasive and established pest insects in specialty crops; impart training to stakeholders and clientele with respect to crop productivity and profitability; develop and offer graduate and undergraduate courses in the entomology discipline
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ashfaq Ahmad Sial
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Entomology, College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
Interests: specialty crops; small fruits; entomology; invasive species; insecticide toxicology; insecticide resistance; integrated pest management
Prof. Jawwad A. Qureshi
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Southwest Florida Research and Education Center, University of Florida 2685 SR 29 North Immokalee, FL 34142, USA
Interests: entomology; biology; ecology; IPM; biological control
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Youichi Kobori
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Crop, Livestock and Environment Division, Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8686, Japan
Interests: Integrated pest management; vector insect; side effect of agrochemicals to natural enemy; epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Insects, weeds, and diseases are posing ever-evolving challenges to global agriculture and food security. Indeed, due to the increasing global population, investments are being made around the world to improve and develop sound scientific approaches to sustain specialty crop production and to provide continued food security in the face of these threats. Integrated pest management (IPM) is the practice of managing invasive and established pests to minimize pest injury using methods that are safe for the environment, humans, and production systems. Globally, pest managers are committed to building upon their past successes to increase implementation of IPM in specialty crops (vegetables, fruits, and nut crops).

In recent decades, the most-commonly used method for pest management has been the direct application of agrochemicals. However, in response to environmental, economic, and other problems associated with over-reliance on synthetic chemicals, there has been an increasing drive towards the development and improvements of integrated pest management (IPM) strategies in specialty crops. Many IPM strategies are now well-developed under protected crop production settings. However, within the open fields in many situations, targeted success is yet to be achieved. This Special Issue will include original research articles and reviews by leading research entomologists, plant pathologists, weed control specialists, and associated experts. Articles will focus on the development, improvement, and implementation of IPM strategies against serious pests (both indigenous and invasive species) in specialty crops. Articles that outline the integration of effective IPM options for a given pest species and also the appropriate use of agrochemicals within the management strategies are particularly welcome.

Dr. Muhammad Haseeb
Dr. Ashfaq Ahmad Sial
Prof. Jawwad A. Qureshi
Dr. Youichi Kobori

 

Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Specialty crops
  • Horticulture
  • Integrated pest management
  • Global population
  • Food security

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Biological Control Potential and Drawbacks of Three Zoophytophagous Mirid Predators against Bemisia tabaci in the United States
Insects 2020, 11(10), 670; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11100670 - 01 Oct 2020
Abstract
Miridae (Hemiptera) of the tribe Dicyphini are important zoophytophagous predators use to control pest arthropods in vegetable crops. However, the risk that their herbivory may cause economic damage could hinder their application as useful biocontrol agents and may limit the likelihood they would [...] Read more.
Miridae (Hemiptera) of the tribe Dicyphini are important zoophytophagous predators use to control pest arthropods in vegetable crops. However, the risk that their herbivory may cause economic damage could hinder their application as useful biocontrol agents and may limit the likelihood they would meet regulatory requirements for importation. We conducted field cage studies to assess the predation capacity and tomato plant damage of three mirid species established in south USA, a known biocontrol agent (Nesidiocoris tenuis), and two native species (Macrolophus praeclarus and Engytatus modestus). All three species significantly reduced the number of whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci) on tomato plants compared to tomato plants without mirids. More damage, evaluated as the number of necrotic rings, was observed on tomato plants with E. modestus and N. tenuis compared to M. praeclarus. In our experiments that included sesame plants (Sesamum indicum) with tomato plants, mirid numbers increased despite a low number of prey, thus showing a benefit of the plant-feeding habit of these predators. USA’s established mirids may therefore prove to be immediately available biological agents for the management of present and future tomato pests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving IPM of Specialty Crop Pests and Global Food Security)
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Open AccessArticle
Host Plant Affects Symbiont Abundance in Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)
Insects 2020, 11(8), 501; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11080501 - 04 Aug 2020
Abstract
Symbionts contribute nutrients that allow insects to feed on plants. The whitefly Bemisia tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) is a polyphagous pest that depends on symbionts to provide key nutrients that are deficient in the diet. Here, we established three whitefly populations [...] Read more.
Symbionts contribute nutrients that allow insects to feed on plants. The whitefly Bemisia tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) is a polyphagous pest that depends on symbionts to provide key nutrients that are deficient in the diet. Here, we established three whitefly populations on eggplants, cucumbers, and tomatoes and observed that they harbored the same symbiont taxa in different quantities. The amount of the primary symbiont, Portiera, decreased with increasing concentrations of host-plant essential amino acids (EAAs). Whitefly populations transferred to different plant species exhibited fluctuations in Portiera amounts in the first three or four generations; the amount of Portiera increased when whitefly populations were transferred to plant species with lower EAAs proportions. As for the secondary symbionts, the whitefly population of eggplants exhibited lower quantities of Hamiltonella and higher quantities of Rickettsia than the other two populations. The changes of both symbionts’ abundance in whitefly populations after host-plant-shifting for one generation showed little correlation with the EAAs’ proportions of host plants. These findings suggest that host-plant nitrogen nutrition, mainly in the form of EAAs, influences the abundance of symbionts, especially Portiera, to meet the nutritional demands of whiteflies. The results will inform efforts to control pests through manipulating symbionts in insect–symbiont associations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving IPM of Specialty Crop Pests and Global Food Security)
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Open AccessArticle
Temperature-Dependent Demographic Characteristics and Control Potential of Aphelinus asychis Reared from Sitobion avenae as a Biological Control Agent for Myzus persicae on Chili Peppers
Insects 2020, 11(8), 475; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11080475 - 27 Jul 2020
Abstract
Aphelinus asychis, a polyphagous parasitoid, has been widely used as an efficient biological control agent against the aphid Myzus persicae. Aiming to evaluate the influence of temperature on the biological characteristics and control potential of A. asychis for M. persicae, we [...] Read more.
Aphelinus asychis, a polyphagous parasitoid, has been widely used as an efficient biological control agent against the aphid Myzus persicae. Aiming to evaluate the influence of temperature on the biological characteristics and control potential of A. asychis for M. persicae, we compared the life table parameters and control potential of A. asychis, which included the developmental time, longevity, fecundity, intrinsic rate of increase (r), and finite killing rate (θ). The results showed that increasing the temperature significantly decreased the developmental time and longevity of A. asychis. The r at 24 (0.2360 d−1) and 28 °C (0.2441 d−1) were significantly greater than those at 20 (0.1848 d−1) and 32 °C (0.1676 d−1). The θ at 24 (0.4495), 28 (0.5414), and 32 °C (0.4312) were also significantly greater than that at 20 °C (0.3140). The relationship between population fitness (r and θ) and temperature followed a unary quadratic function (R2 > 0.95). The temperatures for the expected maximum intrinsic rate of increase (rmax) and the maximum finite killing rate (θmax) were 25.7 and 27.4 °C, respectively. In conclusion, A. asychis could develop and produce progenies within the temperature range of 20–32 °C, and its control efficiency for M. persicae at 24, 28, and 32 °C was greater than that at 20 °C. The most suitable temperature range for controlling M. persicae with A. asychis in the field might be between 25.7 and 27.4 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving IPM of Specialty Crop Pests and Global Food Security)
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