Special Issue "Innovate, Research, and Maintain Transportation Infrastructure"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Mi G. Chorzepa

The University of Georgia, 712E Boyd Graduate Studies, 200 D. W. Brooks Drive, Athens, GA 30602, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: structural analysis and design; experimental and numerical investigation of structures; nonlinear finite element analysis; materials modeling; forensic engineering; structural repair; composite materials; bridge design and evaluation; bridge maintenance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue is to assimilate the current state-of-the-art knowledge in advances in materials and experimental/numerical investigation methods used to evaluate transportation infrastructure and create a forum for researchers and/or transportation agencies with a shared interest of vision, innovation, challenges, research, progress, and long-term asset management of new and existing transportation infrastructure. Examples of interested structures include, but are not limited to, bridges constructed with accelerated bridge construction methods, ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC), bridge decks, steel bridges, traffic sign structures, foundation structures, bridge girders and piers, bearing elements, and concrete pavements.

This issue desires to combine contributions on the latest research developments, including experimental and analytical investigations to innovate research construction materials and delivery methods.  In addition, this issue hopes to address long-term maintenance aspects of transportation assets as they must be managed to adopt new technology, as well as innovative materials and delivery methods.

To this end, this Special Issue includes the following three main topics (or a combination of the topics), which are indispensable aspects of transportation infrastructure:

Innovation

  • innovative construction materials;
  • challenges with innovative materials;
  • accelerated bridge construction (ABC) and innovative delivery methods;
  • challenges with innovative construction or delivery methods;
  • innovation in construction methods and the use of technology;
  • innovation in bridge inspection methods;
  • innovation in research methods;

Research

  • computational modeling methods to evaluate innovation;
  • research projects to sustain and/or support transportation infrastructure;
  • experimental investigation;
  • ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC);
  • numerical predictions;
  • statistical analysis;
  • performance of reinforced concrete elements;
  • advancement in bridge monitoring methods.

Maintenance

  • failures and/or maintenance challenges resulting from (or inherent in) innovation;
  • analysis of bridge inventory data;
  • data collection, analysis, and management;
  • depreciation models used for transportation asset management;
  • infrastructures asset valuation;
  • effect of truck traffic and/or environmental factors;
  • analysis of condition scores;
  • long-term monitoring and management.

Dr. Mi G. Chorzepa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Computational
  • Accelerated
  • Bridge
  • Materials
  • UHPC
  • Numerical
  • Analysis
  • Experiment
  • Aging
  • Innovation
  • Depreciation
  • Maintenance
  • Research

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
On the Use of Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition for the Identification of Bridge Frequency from the Responses Measured in a Passing Vehicle
Infrastructures 2019, 4(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4020032 (registering DOI)
Received: 22 April 2019 / Revised: 21 May 2019 / Accepted: 24 May 2019 / Published: 4 June 2019
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Abstract
In this paper, ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) methods are used for the effective identification of bridge natural frequencies from drive-by measurements. A vehicle bridge interaction (VBI) model is created using the finite element (FE) method in Matlab. [...] Read more.
In this paper, ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) methods are used for the effective identification of bridge natural frequencies from drive-by measurements. A vehicle bridge interaction (VBI) model is created using the finite element (FE) method in Matlab. The EMD is employed to decompose the signals measured on the vehicle to their main components. It is shown that the bridge component of the response measured on the vehicle can be extracted using the EMD method. The influence of some factors, such as the road roughness profile and measurement noise, on the results are investigated. The results suggest that the EMD shows good performance under those conditions, but the accuracy of the results may still need to be improved. It is shown that in some cases, the EMD may not be able to decompose the signal effectively and includes mode mixing. This results in inaccuracies in the identification of bridge frequencies. The use of the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) method is proposed to overcome the mode mixing problem. The influence of factors such as road profile, measurement noise and vehicle velocity are investigated. It is numerically demonstrated that employing the EEMD improves the results compared to the EMD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovate, Research, and Maintain Transportation Infrastructure)
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Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Scour on the Natural Frequency Responses of Bridge Piers: Development of a Scour Depth Sensor
Infrastructures 2019, 4(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4020021
Received: 29 March 2019 / Revised: 29 April 2019 / Accepted: 2 May 2019 / Published: 7 May 2019
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Abstract
Local scour is the removal of soil around bridge foundations under the erosive action of flowing water. This hydraulic risk has raised awareness of the need for developing continuous monitoring techniques to estimate scour depth around bridge piers and abutments. One of the [...] Read more.
Local scour is the removal of soil around bridge foundations under the erosive action of flowing water. This hydraulic risk has raised awareness of the need for developing continuous monitoring techniques to estimate scour depth around bridge piers and abutments. One of the emerging techniques is based on monitoring the vibration frequency of either bridge piers or a driven sensor in the riverbed. The sensor proposed in this study falls into the second category. Some unresolved issues are investigated: the effect of the geometry and material of the sensor, the effect of the embedded length and the effect of soil type. To this end, extensive laboratory tests are performed using rods of different materials, with various geometries and lengths. These tests are conducted in both dry sand and a soft clayey soil. Since the sensor will be placed in the riverbed, it is crucial to evaluate the effect of immersed conditions on its response. A numerical 3D finite-element model was developed and compared against experimental data. This model was then used to compute the ‘wet’ frequencies of the sensor. Finally, based on both the experimental and numerical results, an equivalent cantilever model is proposed to correlate the variation of the frequency of the sensor to the scour depth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovate, Research, and Maintain Transportation Infrastructure)
Figures

Graphical abstract

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