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Titanium-Based Materials for Biomedical Application

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019) | Viewed by 10633

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Bioengineering Institute of Technology, Medicine and Health Sciences Faculty, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, C/ Josep Trueta s/n, 08195 Sant Cugat del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: biomaterials; titanium and its alloys; shape memory alloys; dental materials
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Guest Editor
Department of Applied Physics, Universidade de Vigo, Vigo, Spain
Interests: laser deposition; laser materials processing; coatings; biomaterials; nanoparticles, nanofibres
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the pioneering work with titanium in dental applications in the mid-20th century, titanium and its alloys have remained the most appealing material for medical and dental applications. Due to their unique combination of properties such as high strength to weight ratio, relatively low elastic modulus, light weight, corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, and excellent osseointegration with different methods in order to transform into bioactive material, titanium materials are the material of choice for a huge number of dental and medical applications, especially for high loading prostheses or bone replacement.

The field is booming, with an exponential number of publications dealing with both alloyed and unalloyed titanium materials having been published in the last few years.

New titanium alloys looking for improved mechanical properties and new surface treatments willing to achieve a better interface with the living tissues as well as bioactive coatings are some of the fields of research covered in this Special Issue. The functionalization of titanium surfaces is also a very active field, with many different multidisciplinary approaches. The development of new additive manufacturing techniques, allowing tailoring of the implants to individual requirements is another hot field of research also covered in this Special Issue.

  1. New titanium-based alloys for biomedical applications;
  2. Modification of microstructures related to the properties (biological, mechanical, etc.);
  3. Degradation (Ion release, wear, fatigue, etc.);
  4. Surface modification;
  5. Bioactive surfaces;
  6. Biofunctionalized surfaces;
  7. Bactericide and bacteriostatic titanium;
  8. Interaction titanium with living tissues;
  9. Porous titanium implants;
  10. Osseointegration;
  11. Shape memory effect with titanium alloys.

Prof. Dr. Javier Gil Mur
Prof. Dr. Juan Pou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Titanium alloys
  • low modulus alloys
  • Biocompatibility
  • Bioactive titanium
  • Biofunctionalized titanium
  • Bactericide titanium
  • Shape memory titanium alloys
  • Properties of titanium alloys
  • Porous titanium

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 2002 KiB  
Communication
Comparison between Sandblasted Acid-Etched and Oxidized Titanium Dental Implants: In Vivo Study
by Eugenio Velasco-Ortega, Ivan Ortiz-García, Alvaro Jiménez-Guerra, Loreto Monsalve-Guil, Fernando Muñoz-Guzón, Roman A. Perez and F. Javier Gil
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(13), 3267; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20133267 - 3 Jul 2019
Cited by 53 | Viewed by 6547
Abstract
The surface modifications of titanium dental implants play important roles in the enhancement of osseointegration. The objective of the present study was to test two different implant surface treatments on a rabbit model to investigate the osseointegration. The tested surfaces were: a) acid-etched [...] Read more.
The surface modifications of titanium dental implants play important roles in the enhancement of osseointegration. The objective of the present study was to test two different implant surface treatments on a rabbit model to investigate the osseointegration. The tested surfaces were: a) acid-etched surface with sandblasting treatment (SA) and b) an oxidized implant surface (OS). The roughness was measured by an interferometeric microscope with white light and the residual stress of the surfaces was measured with X-ray residual stress Bragg–Bentano diffraction. Six New Zealand white rabbits were used for the in vivo study. Implants with the two different surfaces (SA and OS) were inserted in the femoral bone. After 12 weeks of implantation, histological and histomorphometric analyses of the blocks containing the implants and the surrounding bone were performed. All the implants were correctly implanted and no signs of infection were observed. SA and OS surfaces were both surrounded by newly formed trabeculae. Histomorphometric analysis revealed that the bone–implant contact % (BIC) was higher around the SA implants (53.49 ± 8.46) than around the OS implants (50.94 ± 16.42), although there were no significant statistical differences among them. Both implant surfaces (SA and OS) demonstrated a good bone response with significant amounts of newly formed bone along the implant surface after 12 weeks of implantation. These results confirmed the importance of the topography and physico–chemical properties of dental implants in the osseointegration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Titanium-Based Materials for Biomedical Application)
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13 pages, 8657 KiB  
Article
Carbon-Doped TiO2 Activated by X-Ray Irradiation for the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species to Enhance Photodynamic Therapy in Tumor Treatment
by Chun-Chen Yang, Min-Hsiung Tsai, Keng-Yuan Li, Chun-Han Hou and Feng-Huei Lin
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(9), 2072; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20092072 - 26 Apr 2019
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 3389
Abstract
Traditional photodynamic therapy (PDT) is limited by the penetration depth of visible light. Although the light source has been changed to near infrared, infrared light is unable to overcome the penetration barrier and it is only effective at the surface of the tumors. [...] Read more.
Traditional photodynamic therapy (PDT) is limited by the penetration depth of visible light. Although the light source has been changed to near infrared, infrared light is unable to overcome the penetration barrier and it is only effective at the surface of the tumors. In this study, we used X-ray as a light source for deep-seated tumor treatment. A particle with a narrow band gap when exposed to soft X-rays would produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to kill tumor cell, with less damage to the normal tissues. Anatase TiO2 has been studied as a photosensitizer in PDT. In the experiment, C was doped into the anatase lattice at an optimum atomic ratio to make the band gap narrower, which would be activated by X-ray to produce more ROS and kill tumor cells under stress. The results showed that the synthesized TiO2:C particles were identified as crystal structures of anatase. The synthesized particles could be activated effectively by soft X-rays to produce ROS, to degrade methylene blue by up to 30.4%. Once TiO2:C was activated by X-ray irradiation, the death rate of A549 cells in in vitro testing was as high as 16.57%, on day 2. In the animal study, the tumor size gradually decreased after treatment with TiO2:C and exposure to X-rays on day 0 and day 8. On day 14, the tumor declined to nearly half of its initial volume, while the tumor in the control group was twice its initial volume. After the animal was sacrificed, blood, and major organs were harvested for further analysis and examination, with data fully supporting the safety of the treatment. Based on the results of the study, we believe that TiO2:C when exposed to X-rays could overcome the limitation of penetration depth and could improve PDT effects by inhibiting tumor growth effectively and safely, in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Titanium-Based Materials for Biomedical Application)
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