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Special Issue "Signal Transduction Pathways in Plants for Resistance Against Plant Pathogens 2019"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Plant Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hon-Ming Lam Website E-Mail
School of Life Sciences and Center for Soybean Research of the Partner State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China
Interests: plant genomic; plant defense; plant-microbe interaction; plant signal transduction
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jianzhong Liu Website E-Mail
College of Chemistry and Life, Zhejiang Normal University, Zhejiang, China
Interests: defense signaling; virus-induced gene silencing; nitric oxide signaling; cell death

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is the continuation of our previous special issue "Signal Transduction Pathways in Plants for Resistance Against Plant Pathogens".

Pathogens could severely limit plant growth and hence pose a severe threat to crop productivity. The co-evolutionary war between plants and their pathogens has led to the development of complex signaling systems in plants, enabling them to sense the presence of both compatible and incompatible pathogens and trigger their defense systems precisely and promptly. This Special Issue explores the signal transduction pathways in plants that led to resistance against pathogens, including, but not limited to, functional analysis of qualitative and quantitation resistance genes, defense mechanisms, plant-pathogen interactions, and signal transduction crosstalk.

Prof. Dr. Hon-Ming Lam
Prof. Dr. Jianzhong Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant defense
  • plant immunity
  • plant pathogens
  • plant-microbe interaction
  • plant signal transduction
  • resistance genes
  • avirulence genes
  • signaling crosstalk

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Genes Associated with the Lr47-Mediated Wheat Resistance to Leaf Rust (Puccinia triticina)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(18), 4498; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20184498 - 11 Sep 2019
Abstract
Puccinia triticina (Pt), the causal agent of wheat leaf rust, is one of the most destructive fungal pathogens threatening global wheat cultivations. The rational utilization of leaf rust resistance (Lr) genes is still the most efficient method for the [...] Read more.
Puccinia triticina (Pt), the causal agent of wheat leaf rust, is one of the most destructive fungal pathogens threatening global wheat cultivations. The rational utilization of leaf rust resistance (Lr) genes is still the most efficient method for the control of such diseases. The Lr47 gene introgressed from chromosome 7S of Aegilops speltoides still showed high resistance to the majority of Pt races collected in China. However, the Lr47 gene has not been cloned yet, and the regulatory network of the Lr47-mediated resistance has not been explored. In the present investigation, transcriptome analysis was applied on RNA samples from three different wheat lines (“Yecora Rojo”, “UC1037”, and “White Yecora”) carrying the Lr47 gene three days post-inoculation with the epidemic Pt race THTT. A comparison between Pt-inoculated and water-inoculated “Lr47-Yecora Rojo” lines revealed a total number of 863 upregulated (q-value < 0.05 and log2foldchange > 1) and 418 downregulated (q-value < 0.05 and log2foldchange < −1) genes. Specifically, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) located on chromosomes 7AS, 7BS, and 7DS were identified, ten of which encoded receptor-like kinases (RLKs). The expression patterns of these RLK genes were further determined by a time-scale qRT-PCR assay. Moreover, heatmaps for the expression profiles of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes and several transcription factor gene families were generated. Using a transcriptomic approach, we initially profiled the transcriptional changes associated with the Lr47-mediated resistance. The identified DEGs, particularly those genes encoding RLKs, might serve as valuable genetic resources for the improvement of wheat resistance to Pt. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Transcriptome Analysis of Chinese Chestnut (Castanea mollissima Blume) in Response to Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu Infestation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(4), 855; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20040855 - 15 Feb 2019
Abstract
Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima Blume) can be infested by Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu, resulting in gall formation and yield losses. Research on the control of gall wasps using genomics approaches is rarely reported. We used RNA-seq to investigate the dynamic changes in the [...] Read more.
Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima Blume) can be infested by Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu, resulting in gall formation and yield losses. Research on the control of gall wasps using genomics approaches is rarely reported. We used RNA-seq to investigate the dynamic changes in the genes of a chestnut species (C. mollissima B.) during four gall-formation stages caused by D. kuriphilus. A total of 21,306 genes were annotated by BLAST in databases. Transcriptome comparison between different gall-formation stages revealed many genes that were differentially expressed compared to the control. Among these, 2410, 7373, 6294, and 9412 genes were differentially expressed in four gall-formation stages: initiation stage (A), early growth stage (B), late growth stage (C), and maturation stage (D), respectively. Annotation analysis indicated that many metabolic processes (e.g., phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, plant–pathogen interaction) were affected. Interesting genes encoding putative components of signal transduction, stress response, and transcription factors were also differentially regulated. These genes might play important roles in response to D. kuriphilus gall formation. These new data on the mechanism by which D. kuriphilus infests chestnuts could help improve chestnut resistance. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Evolution of Disease Defense Genes and Their Regulators in Plants
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(2), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20020335 - 15 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Biotic stresses do damage to the growth and development of plants, and yield losses for some crops. Confronted with microbial infections, plants have evolved multiple defense mechanisms, which play important roles in the never-ending molecular arms race of plant–pathogen interactions. The complicated defense [...] Read more.
Biotic stresses do damage to the growth and development of plants, and yield losses for some crops. Confronted with microbial infections, plants have evolved multiple defense mechanisms, which play important roles in the never-ending molecular arms race of plant–pathogen interactions. The complicated defense systems include pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) triggered immunity (PTI), effector triggered immunity (ETI), and the exosome-mediated cross-kingdom RNA interference (CKRI) system. Furthermore, plants have evolved a classical regulation system mediated by miRNAs to regulate these defense genes. Most of the genes/small RNAs or their regulators that involve in the defense pathways can have very rapid evolutionary rates in the longitudinal and horizontal co-evolution with pathogens. According to these internal defense mechanisms, some strategies such as molecular switch for the disease resistance genes, host-induced gene silencing (HIGS), and the new generation of RNA-based fungicides, have been developed to control multiple plant diseases. These broadly applicable new strategies by transgene or spraying ds/sRNA may lead to reduced application of pesticides and improved crop yield. Full article
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