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Special Issue "Radiation in Multimodal Tumor Immune Therapies – Mechanisms and Application"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Udo S. Gaipl
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
Interests: radiotherapy; immunotherapy; vaccination; immune checkpoints; hyperthermia; tumor immunology; immunogenic cancer cell death; immunomonitoring; inflammatory and degenerative diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Benjamin Frey
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
Interests: radiotherapy; immunotherapy; vaccination; immune checkpoints; hyperthermia; tumor immunology; immunogenic cancer cell death; immunomonitoring; inflammatory and degenerative diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

After the great success of the special issue on “Partnership of Radiotherapy and Immunotherapy”, in this Issue, we will continue to focus on how radiation modulates the immune system, and thereby contributes to the induction of anti-tumor immune reactions, and/or creates a micro-environment that calls for the addition of distinct immune therapies. On the other hand, the modes of action of immunotherapies should be picked up and put in connection with radiation responses. In this context, stratification markers for a combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy should be suggested, validated, and critically discussed. We are looking forward to receiving submissions about the basic science and translational workings of a immuno-oncology society.

With warm regards,

Prof. Dr. Udo S. Gaipl
Dr. Benjamin Frey
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Radiotherapy
  • DNA damage responses
  • Immunotherapy
  • Immune checkpoints
  • Vaccination
  • Cytokines
  • Adoptive immune cell transfer
  • Hyperthermia
  • Cancer
  • Biomarkers
  • Immune monitoring
  • Tumor mutational burden
  • HLA class II antigen-processing pathway

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
N-Dihydrogalactochitosan Potentiates the Radiosensitivity of Liver Metastatic Tumor Cells Originated from Murine Breast Tumors
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(22), 5581; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20225581 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
Radiation is a widely used therapeutic method for treating breast cancer. N-dihydrogalactochitosan (GC), a biocompatible immunostimulant, is known to enhance the effects of various treatment modalities in different tumor types. However, whether GC can enhance the radiosensitivity of cancer cells remains to [...] Read more.
Radiation is a widely used therapeutic method for treating breast cancer. N-dihydrogalactochitosan (GC), a biocompatible immunostimulant, is known to enhance the effects of various treatment modalities in different tumor types. However, whether GC can enhance the radiosensitivity of cancer cells remains to be explored. In this study, triple-negative murine 4T1 breast cancer cells transduced with multi-reporter genes were implanted in immunocompetent Balb/C mice to track, dissect, and identify liver-metastatic 4T1 cells. These cells expressed cancer stem cell (CSC) -related characteristics, including the ability to form spheroids, the expression of the CD44 marker, and the increase of protein stability. We then ex vivo investigated the potential effect of GC on the radiosensitivity of the liver-metastatic 4T1 breast cancer cells and compared the results to those of parental 4T1 cells subjected to the same treatment. The cells were irradiated with increased doses of X-rays with or without GC treatment. Colony formation assays were then performed to determine the survival fractions and radiosensitivity of these cells. We found that GC preferably increased the radiosensitivity of liver-metastatic 4T1 breast cancer cells rather than that of the parental cells. Additionally, the single-cell DNA electrophoresis assay (SCDEA) and γ-H2AX foci assay were performed to assess the level of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs). Compared to the parental cells, DNA damage was significantly increased in liver-metastatic 4T1 cells after they were treated with GC plus radiation. Further studies on apoptosis showed that this combination treatment increased the sub-G1 population of cells, but not caspase-3 cleavage, in liver-metastatic breast cancer cells. Taken together, the current data suggest that the synergistic effects of GC and irradiation might be used to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy in treating metastatic tumors. Full article
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