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Special Issue "Amino Acid Metabolism and Regulation in Health and Disease"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Isao Ishii
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Health Chemistry, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Machida, Tokyo 194-8543, Japan
Interests: amino acid metabolism; homocysteine; hydrogen sulfide; lysophospholipid signaling; proteomics; metabolomics; signal transduction
Prof. Dr. Madhav Bhatia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pathology and Biomedical Science, University of Otago, Christchurch, 2 Riccarton Avenue, PO Box 4345, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
Interests: inflammation; acute pancreatitis; sepsis; burn injury; arthritis; hydrogen sulfide; substance P; chemokines; leukocytes
Prof. Dr. Hieronim Jakubowski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Rutgers University‐New Jersey Medical School, International Center for Public Health, 225 Warren Street, Newark, NJ, USA
Interests: genetic code; protein biosynthesis; tRNA synthetase; error-editing mechanisms; prebiotic chemistry; evolution of life; sulfur metabolism; homocysteine; protein modification; mTOR/autophagy; cardiovascular disease; Alzheimer's disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Amino acids, the primary component of proteins, are not stored in the human body, unlike carbohydrates and fats. The (free) amino acid pool is estimated to be only ~100 g in comparison with the amount of proteins (~12 kg) in a 70 kg person. Therefore, amino acids must be obtained from the diet, synthesized de novo (as are the eleven non-essential amino acids), or supplied from endogenous protein degradation. Amino acids can then be used for protein synthesis, the conversion to various nitrogen-containing essential biomolecules including neurotransmitters, purines and pyrimidines, porphyrins, creatine, and gaseous transmitters (NO, CO, and H2S), as well as an energy source. Six decades have passed since the identification of inborn errors in amino acid metabolism such as phenylketonuria, maple syrup disease, and homocystinuria. Thereafter, a growing body of evidence is accumulating to show the involvement of dysregulated amino acid metabolism in various aspects of common acquired disease conditions such as cardiovascular diseases, oncogenesis/tumor progression/metastasis, inflammation/autoimmune diseases, and metabolic syndrome. The Special Issue, “Amino Acid Metabolism and Regulation in Health and Disease”, of the International Journal of Molecular Sciences will include a selection of original research papers and reviews on the molecular and cellular biology of amino acids, including recently discovered fundamental aspects of regulation by bioactive amino acids (mTOR signaling and autophagy, sensing of amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases), their metabolites (NO, H2S, homocysteine, and glutathione), and post-translational protein modification (S-nitrosylation, S-sulfhydration, S-glutathionylation, S- and N-homocysteinylation, and lysine residue aminoacylation), and their roles in health and disease.

Prof. Dr. Isao Ishii
Prof. Dr. Madhav Bhatia
Prof. Dr. Hieronim Jakubowski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • amino acids
  • amino acid derivatives
  • metabolism
  • aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases
  • protein modification
  • autophagy
  • mTOR signaling

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Methionine Diet on Metabolic and Histopathological Changes of Rat Hippocampus
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(24), 6234; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20246234 - 10 Dec 2019
Abstract
Hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcy) is regarded as an independent and strong risk factor for cerebrovascular diseases, stroke, and dementias. The hippocampus has a crucial role in spatial navigation and memory processes and is being constantly studied for neurodegenerative disorders. We used a moderate methionine (Met) [...] Read more.
Hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcy) is regarded as an independent and strong risk factor for cerebrovascular diseases, stroke, and dementias. The hippocampus has a crucial role in spatial navigation and memory processes and is being constantly studied for neurodegenerative disorders. We used a moderate methionine (Met) diet at a dose of 2 g/kg of animal weight/day in duration of four weeks to induce mild hHcy in adult male Wistar rats. A novel approach has been used to explore the hippocampal metabolic changes using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS), involving a 7T MR scanner in combination with histochemical and immunofluorescence analysis. We found alterations in the metabolic profile, as well as remarkable histo-morphological changes such as an increase of hippocampal volume, alterations in number and morphology of astrocytes, neurons, and their processes in the selective vulnerable brain area of animals treated with a Met-enriched diet. Results of both methodologies suggest that the mild hHcy induced by Met-enriched diet alters volume, histo-morphological pattern, and metabolic profile of hippocampal brain area, which might eventually endorse the neurodegenerative processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amino Acid Metabolism and Regulation in Health and Disease)
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Open AccessArticle
Application of Butylamine as a Conjugative Reagent to On-Column Derivatization for the Determination of Antioxidant Amino Acids in Brain Tissue, Plasma, and Urine Samples
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(13), 3340; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20133340 - 07 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
(1) Antioxidants are involved in body protection mechanisms against reactive oxygen species. Amino acids such as glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) are known to be involved in providing protection against oxidative lethality. A quick and simple method for the determination of NAC [...] Read more.
(1) Antioxidants are involved in body protection mechanisms against reactive oxygen species. Amino acids such as glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) are known to be involved in providing protection against oxidative lethality. A quick and simple method for the determination of NAC and GSH in various biological matrices such as urine, plasma, and homogenates of brain tissues has been developed and described in this work. (2) The assay is based on reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography with spectrofluorimetric detection and on-column derivatization. Butylamine and o-phthaldialdehyde have been used as derivatization reagents. Since o-phthaldialdehyde constitutes a part of the mobile phase, the derivatization reaction and chromatographic separation occur simultaneously. (3) Linearity in the detector response for NAC in human urine was observed in the range of 5–200 nmol mL−1, and NAC and GSH in the brain tissue homogenates were observed in the range of 0.5–5 nmol mL−1 and 0.5–15 nmol mL−1, respectively. Human plasma linearity ranges covered 0.25–5.00 nmol mL−1 and 0.5–15 nmol mL−1 for NAC and GSH, respectively. The LODs for NAC and GSH were 0.01 and 0.02 nmol mL−1 while the LOQs were 0.02 and 0.05 nmol mL−1, respectively. The usefulness of the proposed method was proven through its application to real samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amino Acid Metabolism and Regulation in Health and Disease)
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Open AccessArticle
Cystathionine-Gamma-Lyase-Derived Hydrogen Sulfide-Regulated Substance P Modulates Liver Sieve Fenestrations in Caecal Ligation and Puncture-Induced Sepsis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(13), 3191; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20133191 - 29 Jun 2019
Abstract
Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is a hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-synthesizing enzyme that promotes inflammation by upregulating H2S in sepsis. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are fenestrated endothelial cells (liver sieve) that undergo alteration during sepsis and H2S plays a role [...] Read more.
Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is a hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-synthesizing enzyme that promotes inflammation by upregulating H2S in sepsis. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are fenestrated endothelial cells (liver sieve) that undergo alteration during sepsis and H2S plays a role in this process. Substance P (SP) is encoded by the preprotachykinin A (PPTA) gene, and promotes inflammation in sepsis; however, its regulation by H2S is poorly understood. Furthermore, the interaction between H2S and SP in modulating LSEC fenestrations following sepsis remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether CSE/H2S regulates SP and the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) and modulates fenestrations in LSECs following caecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis. Here we report that the absence of either CSE or H2S protects against liver sieve defenestration and gaps formation in LSECs in sepsis by decreased SP-NK-1R signaling. Following sepsis, there is an increased expression of liver CSE and H2S synthesis, and plasma H2S levels, which were aligned with higher SP levels in the liver, lungs and plasma and NK-1R in the liver and lungs. The genetic deletion of CSE led to decreased sepsis-induced SP and NK-1R in the liver, lungs and plasma SP suggesting H2S synthesized through CSE regulates the SP-NK-1R pathway in sepsis. Further, mice deficient in the SP-encoding gene (PPTA) preserved sepsis-induced LSEC defenestration and gaps formation, as seen by maintenance of patent fenestrations and fewer gaps. In conclusion, CSE/H2S regulates SP-NK-1R and modulates LSEC fenestrations in sepsis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amino Acid Metabolism and Regulation in Health and Disease)
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Open AccessArticle
Serum Proteome Alterations in Human Cystathionine β-Synthase Deficiency and Ischemic Stroke Subtypes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(12), 3096; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20123096 - 25 Jun 2019
Abstract
Ischemic stroke induces brain injury via thrombotic or embolic mechanisms involving large or small vessels. Cystathionine β-synthase deficiency (CBS), an inborn error of metabolism, is associated with vascular thromboembolism, the major cause of morbidity and mortality in affected patients. Because thromboembolism involves the [...] Read more.
Ischemic stroke induces brain injury via thrombotic or embolic mechanisms involving large or small vessels. Cystathionine β-synthase deficiency (CBS), an inborn error of metabolism, is associated with vascular thromboembolism, the major cause of morbidity and mortality in affected patients. Because thromboembolism involves the brain vasculature in these patients, we hypothesize that CBS deficiency and ischemic stroke have similar molecular phenotypes. We used label-free mass spectrometry for quantification of changes in serum proteomes in CBS-deficient patients (n = 10) and gender/age-matched unaffected controls (n = 14), as well as in patients with cardioembolic (n = 17), large-vessel (n = 26), or lacunar (n = 25) ischemic stroke subtype. In CBS-deficient patients, 40 differentially expressed serum proteins were identified, of which 18 were associated with elevated homocysteine (Hcy) and 22 were Hcy-independent. We also identified Hcy-independent differentially expressed serum proteins in ischemic stroke patients, some of which were unique to a specific subtype: 10 of 32 for cardioembolic vs. large-vessel, six of 33 for cardioembolic vs. lacunar, and six of 23 for large-vessel vs. lacunar. There were significant overlaps between proteins affected by CBS deficiency and ischemic stroke, particularly the cardioembolic subtype, similar to protein overlaps between ischemic stroke subtypes. Top molecular pathways affected by CBS deficiency and ischemic stroke subtypes included acute phase response signaling and coagulation system. Similar molecular networks centering on NFκB were affected by CBS deficiency and stroke subtypes. These findings suggest common mechanisms involved in the pathologies of CBS deficiency and ischemic stroke subtypes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amino Acid Metabolism and Regulation in Health and Disease)
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Open AccessArticle
Goeckerman Therapy of Psoriasis: Genotoxicity, Dietary Micronutrients, Homocysteine, and MTHFR Gene Polymorphisms
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(8), 1908; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20081908 - 17 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Goeckerman therapy (GT) of psoriasis vulgaris is based on the application of crude coal tar and ultraviolet radiation. We investigated DNA damage by the number of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNBC) in lymphocytes, serum homocysteine, vitamin B12, folic acid, and two polymorphisms (C677T and [...] Read more.
Goeckerman therapy (GT) of psoriasis vulgaris is based on the application of crude coal tar and ultraviolet radiation. We investigated DNA damage by the number of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNBC) in lymphocytes, serum homocysteine, vitamin B12, folic acid, and two polymorphisms (C677T and A1298C) in the MTHFR gene in 35 patients with exacerbated psoriasis vulgaris classified according to the psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) score and treated by GT. The median of PASI score decreased from nineteen to five, and MNBC increased from 10 to 18‰ after GT (p < 0.001 in both cases). Correlations of MNBC with homocysteine (Spearman’s rho = 0.420, p = 0.012) and vitamin B12 (rho = −0.389, p = 0.021) before the therapy were observed. Hyperhomocysteinemia was an independent predictor of genotoxicity (OR 9.91; 95% CI, 2.09–55.67; p = 0.003). Homocysteine was higher in females than in males (13 vs. 12 µmol/L, p = 0.045). In contrast, vitamin B12 levels in the females were lower than in the males (160 vs. 192 pmol/L, p = 0.047). Vitamin B12 in the females were negatively influenced by smoking status (160 pmol/L in smokers vs. 192 pmol/L in non-smokers, p = 0.025). A significantly higher MNBC was found in CC homozygous patients (A1298C polymorphism) than in AC heterozygotes (32 vs. 16‰, p = 0.005) and AA homozygotes (32 vs. 18‰, p = 0.036). Our data showed that homocysteine participates in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Its serum levels correlated with MNBC and allowed the prediction of DNA damage to appear within GT. Both micronutrients status and homocysteine metabolic pathway contribute to the genotoxicity of GT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amino Acid Metabolism and Regulation in Health and Disease)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Dysregulation of Epigenetic Mechanisms of Gene Expression in the Pathologies of Hyperhomocysteinemia
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(13), 3140; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20133140 - 27 Jun 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) exerts a wide range of biological effects and is associated with a number of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, dementia, neural tube defects, and cancer. Although mechanisms of HHcy toxicity are not fully uncovered, there has been a significant progress in their [...] Read more.
Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) exerts a wide range of biological effects and is associated with a number of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, dementia, neural tube defects, and cancer. Although mechanisms of HHcy toxicity are not fully uncovered, there has been a significant progress in their understanding. The picture emerging from the studies of homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism and pathophysiology is a complex one, as Hcy and its metabolites affect biomolecules and processes in a tissue- and sex-specific manner. Because of their connection to one carbon metabolism and editing mechanisms in protein biosynthesis, Hcy and its metabolites impair epigenetic control of gene expression mediated by DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNA, which underlies the pathology of human disease. In this review we summarize the recent evidence showing that epigenetic dysregulation of gene expression, mediated by changes in DNA methylation and histone N-homocysteinylation, is a pathogenic consequence of HHcy in many human diseases. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of human disease induced by Hcy and its metabolites, and suggest therapeutic targets for the prevention and/or treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amino Acid Metabolism and Regulation in Health and Disease)
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