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Special Issue "Secondary Osteoporosis in Adults"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Iacopo Chiodini
Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor of Endocrinology, Dept. of Clinical Sciences & Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Head, Unit for Bone Metabolism Diseases and Diabetes & Lab of Endocrine and Metabolic Research Istituto Auxologico Italiano, IRCCS, Milan Italy
Interests: adrenal diseases; parathyroid diseases; osteoporosis; metabolic bone diseases; endocrine hypertension
Dr. Alberto Falchetti
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Bone and Mineral Diseases Branch, San Giuseppe Hospital, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Piancavallo, Verbania, Italy
Interests: osteoporosis; metabolic bone diseases; parathyroid diseases; multiple endocrine neoplasia; genetic diseases of bone
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Luigi Gennari
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neurosciences, University of Siena, Italy
Interests: osteoporosis; metabolic bone diseases; Paget’s disease of bone; type 2 diabetes
Dr. Fabio Vescini
Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University-Hospital S. Maria Misericordia, Udine, Italy
Interests: osteoporosis; metabolic bone diseases; renal stone disease and mineral metabolism disorders, parathyroid diseases; thyroid diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is known that skeletal fragility may represent the effect of several systemic diseases and drugs, leading to “secondary osteoporosis”. The typical characteristic of secondary osteoporosis is an alteration of bone quality that, in turn, increases the risk of fractures even in the presence of normal or slightly reduced bone mineral density.

Very often, fragility fractures are the manifest symptoms of these underlying diseases that otherwise could be completely asymptomatic for many years. The diagnosis of a systemic disease in a patient with an inexplicable form of osteoporosis or fragility fracture may often consent to prevent the extra-skeletal consequences of the underlying disease. Moreover, a correct diagnosis reduces the risk of inadequate treatments, and this is particularly important in secondary osteoporosis as far as, by curing the underlying disease, we have a good opportunity for reducing the fracture risk.

In this Special Issue, we will include several reviews covering the most frequent and important forms of secondary osteoporosis due to obesity and diabetes or to endocrine, gastrointestinal, haematologic, rheumatological, neuro-psychiatric, and kidney diseases, and, finally, genetic disorders and drugs. Moreover, we will welcome your contributions in the form of original research on all the aspects of secondary osteoporosis.

Dr. Iacopo Chiodini
Dr. Alberto Falchetti
Dr. Luigi Gennari
Dr. Fabio Vescini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Osteoporosis
  • Endocrine Diseases
  • Gastrointestinal Diseases
  • Haematologic Diseases
  • Genetic Diseases
  • Neuro-psychiatric dieseases
  • Kidney Diseases
  • Bone-impacting drugs

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
MicroRNA-29a Counteracts Glucocorticoid Induction of Bone Loss through Repressing TNFSF13b Modulation of Osteoclastogenesis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(20), 5141; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20205141 - 17 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Glucocorticoid excess escalates osteoclastic resorption, accelerating bone mass loss and microarchitecture damage, which ramps up osteoporosis development. MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) regulates osteoblast and chondrocyte function; however, the action of miR-29a to osteoclastic activity in the glucocorticoid-induced osteoporotic bone remains elusive. In this study, we [...] Read more.
Glucocorticoid excess escalates osteoclastic resorption, accelerating bone mass loss and microarchitecture damage, which ramps up osteoporosis development. MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) regulates osteoblast and chondrocyte function; however, the action of miR-29a to osteoclastic activity in the glucocorticoid-induced osteoporotic bone remains elusive. In this study, we showed that transgenic mice overexpressing an miR-29a precursor driven by phosphoglycerate kinase exhibited a minor response to glucocorticoid-mediated bone mineral density loss, cortical bone porosity and overproduction of serum resorption markers C-teleopeptide of type I collagen and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b levels. miR-29a overexpression compromised trabecular bone erosion and excessive osteoclast number histopathology in glucocorticoid-treated skeletal tissue. Ex vivo, the glucocorticoid-provoked osteoblast formation and osteoclastogenic markers (NFATc1, MMP9, V-ATPase, carbonic anhydrase II and cathepsin K) along with F-actin ring development and pit formation of primary bone-marrow macrophages were downregulated in miR-29a transgenic mice. Mechanistically, tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 13b (TNFSF13b) participated in the glucocorticoid-induced osteoclast formation. miR-29a decreased the suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2) enrichment in the TNFSF13b promoter and downregulated the cytokine production. In vitro, forced miR-29a expression and SOCS2 knockdown attenuated the glucocorticoid-induced TNFSF13b expression in osteoblasts. miR-29a wards off glucocorticoid-mediated excessive bone resorption by repressing the TNFSF13b modulation of osteoclastic activity. This study sheds new light onto the immune-regulatory actions of miR-29a protection against glucocorticoid-mediated osteoporosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Secondary Osteoporosis in Adults)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Osteoporosis in Skin Diseases
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(13), 4749; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21134749 - 03 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Osteoporosis (OP) is defined as a generalized skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass and an alteration of the microarchitecture that lead to an increase in bone fragility and, therefore, an increased risk of fractures. It must be considered today as a true [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis (OP) is defined as a generalized skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass and an alteration of the microarchitecture that lead to an increase in bone fragility and, therefore, an increased risk of fractures. It must be considered today as a true public health problem and the most widespread metabolic bone disease that affects more than 200 million people worldwide. Under physiological conditions, there is a balance between bone formation and bone resorption necessary for skeletal homeostasis. In pathological situations, this balance is altered in favor of osteoclast (OC)-mediated bone resorption. During chronic inflammation, the balance between bone formation and bone resorption may be considerably affected, contributing to a net prevalence of osteoclastogenesis. Skin diseases are the fourth cause of human disease in the world, affecting approximately one third of the world’s population with a prevalence in elderly men. Inflammation and the various associated cytokine patterns are the basis of both osteoporosis and most skin pathologies. Moreover, dermatological patients also undergo local or systemic treatments with glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants that could increase the risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, particular attention should be paid to bone health in these patients. The purpose of the present review is to take stock of the knowledge in this still quite unexplored field, despite the frequency of such conditions in clinical practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Secondary Osteoporosis in Adults)
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Open AccessReview
Hematological Diseases and Osteoporosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(10), 3538; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21103538 - 16 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Secondary osteoporosis is a common clinical problem faced by bone specialists, with a higher frequency in men than in women. One of several causes of secondary osteoporosis is hematological disease. There are numerous hematological diseases that can have a deleterious impact on bone [...] Read more.
Secondary osteoporosis is a common clinical problem faced by bone specialists, with a higher frequency in men than in women. One of several causes of secondary osteoporosis is hematological disease. There are numerous hematological diseases that can have a deleterious impact on bone health. In the literature, there is an abundance of evidence of bone involvement in patients affected by multiple myeloma, systemic mastocytosis, thalassemia, and hemophilia; some skeletal disorders are also reported in sickle cell disease. Recently, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance appears to increase fracture risk, predominantly in male subjects. The pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for these bone loss effects have not yet been completely clarified. Many soluble factors, in particular cytokines that regulate bone metabolism, appear to play an important role. An integrated approach to these hematological diseases, with the help of a bone specialist, could reduce the bone fracture rate and improve the quality of life of these patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Secondary Osteoporosis in Adults)
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Open AccessReview
Does Allergy Break Bones? Osteoporosis and Its Connection to Allergy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(3), 712; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21030712 - 21 Jan 2020
Cited by 7
Abstract
Osteoporosis and allergic diseases are important causes of morbidity, and traditionally their coexistence has been attributed to causality, to independent processes, and they were considered unrelated. However, the increasing knowledge in the field of osteoimmunology and an increasing number of epidemiological and biological [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis and allergic diseases are important causes of morbidity, and traditionally their coexistence has been attributed to causality, to independent processes, and they were considered unrelated. However, the increasing knowledge in the field of osteoimmunology and an increasing number of epidemiological and biological studies have provided support to a correlation between bone and allergy that share pathways, cells, cytokines and mediators. If the link between allergic pathology and bone alterations appears more subtle, there are conditions such as mastocytosis and hypereosinophilic or hyper-IgE syndromes characterized by the proliferation of cells or hyper-production of molecules that play a key role in allergies, in which this link is at least clinically more evident, and the diseases are accompanied by frank skeletal involvement, offering multiple speculation cues. The pathophysiological connection of allergy and osteoporosis is currently an intriguing area of research. The aim of this review is to summarize and bring together the current knowledge and pursue an opportunity to stimulate further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Secondary Osteoporosis in Adults)
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Open AccessReview
Osteoporosis in Rheumatic Diseases
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(23), 5867; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20235867 - 22 Nov 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Osteoporosis is a chronic disease characterized by an increased risk of fragility fracture. Patients affected by rheumatic diseases are at greater risk of developing osteoporosis. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and treatment of osteoporosis in patients [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis is a chronic disease characterized by an increased risk of fragility fracture. Patients affected by rheumatic diseases are at greater risk of developing osteoporosis. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and treatment of osteoporosis in patients affected by rheumatic diseases with special focus for rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, vasculitides, Sjogren syndrome, and crystal-induced arthritis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Secondary Osteoporosis in Adults)
Open AccessReview
Anticoagulants and Osteoporosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(21), 5275; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20215275 - 24 Oct 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Anticoagulant agents are widely used in the treatment of thromboembolic events and in stroke prevention. Data about their effects on bone tissue are in some cases limited or inconsistent (oral anti-vitamin K agents), and in others are sufficiently strong (heparins) to suggest caution [...] Read more.
Anticoagulant agents are widely used in the treatment of thromboembolic events and in stroke prevention. Data about their effects on bone tissue are in some cases limited or inconsistent (oral anti-vitamin K agents), and in others are sufficiently strong (heparins) to suggest caution in their use in subjects at risk of osteoporosis. This review analyses the effects of this group of drugs on bone metabolism, on bone mineral density, and on fragility fractures. A literature search strategy was developed by an experienced team of specialists by consulting the MEDLINE platform, including published papers and reviews updated to March 2019. Literature supports a detrimental effect of heparin on bone, with an increase in fracture rate. Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) seem to be safer than heparin. Although anti-vitamin K agents (VKAs) have a significant impact on bone metabolism, and in particular, on osteocalcin, data on bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are contrasting. To date, the new direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are found to safe for bone health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Secondary Osteoporosis in Adults)
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