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Special Issue "Workplace Interventions"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021) | Viewed by 27522

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Irene Jensen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Karolinska Institute, Department of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Box 210, SE 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: worker health; work place interventions; implementation research; psychosocial work environment; mental health; musculoskeletal health; health economics
Dr. Christina Björklund
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Karolinska Institute, Department of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Box 210, SE 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: psychosocial work environment; leadership; bullying; mental health; management; intervention research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Workplace interventions are directed at promoting or improving health and safety in the workplace. It may include safety interventions aiming at avoiding accidents as well as measures aiming at worker health. The vast majority of the research today is focused on identifying risk factors in the work environment related to an increased risk of ill health or accidents. Less research has been conducted on developing and evaluating the effectiveness of interventions. An important aspect of measures in the workplace is to include financial analysis with regards to cost/benefit. Recent research has shown that effective interventions at the workplace improve worker health as well as the company’s profitability.

There are several methodological challenges when conducting intervention studies at workplaces, with everyday activities in the workplace focusing on producing goods or services. The golden standard of research methodology with randomized controlled designs may not be feasible to use in these cases; nevertheless, there are high quality alternatives with other controlled designs.

This Special Issue offers an opportunity to publish high quality multidisciplinary research and reviews that focus on workplace interventions directed at worker health and safety. We especially invite intervention studies which apply controlled designs. Researchers who have conducted research on this topic are invited to submit manuscripts for consideration for this Special Issue in IJERPH.

Prof. Dr. Irene Jensen
Dr. Christina Björklund
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • workplace intervention
  • implementation
  • safety interventions in the workplace
  • occupational health
  • health promotion
  • worker health

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Relational Fit in Organizational Interventions—What Can Organizational Research Learn from Research in Psychotherapy?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8104; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18158104 - 30 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1475
Abstract
There is a growing interest in organizational interventions (OI) aiming to increase employees’ well-being. An OI involves changes in the way work is designed, organized, and managed. Studies have shown that an OI’s positive results are increased if there is a good fit [...] Read more.
There is a growing interest in organizational interventions (OI) aiming to increase employees’ well-being. An OI involves changes in the way work is designed, organized, and managed. Studies have shown that an OI’s positive results are increased if there is a good fit between context and intervention and between participant and intervention. In this article, we propose that a third fit—the Relational Fit (R-Fit)—also plays an important role in determining an intervention’s outcome. The R-Fit consists of factors related to (1) the employees participating in the OI, (2) the intervention facilitator, and (3) the quality of the relation between participants and the intervention facilitator. The concept of the R-Fit is inspired by research in psychotherapy documenting that participant factors, therapist factors, and the quality of the relations explain 40% of the effect of an intervention. We call attention to the importance of systematically evaluating and improving the R-Fit in OIs. This is important to enhance the positive outcomes in OIs and thereby increase both the well-being and productivity of employees. We introduce concrete measures that can be used to study and evaluate the R-Fit. This article is the first to combine knowledge from research in psychotherapy with research on OIs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Article
A Participatory Intervention to Improve the Psychosocial Work Environment and Mental Health in Human Service Organisations. A Mixed Methods Evaluation Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3546; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073546 - 29 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1152
Abstract
Work-related stress is a global problem causing suffering and economic costs. In Sweden, employees in human service occupations are overrepresented among persons on sick leave due to mental health problems such as stress-related disorders. The psychosocial work environment is one contributing factor for [...] Read more.
Work-related stress is a global problem causing suffering and economic costs. In Sweden, employees in human service occupations are overrepresented among persons on sick leave due to mental health problems such as stress-related disorders. The psychosocial work environment is one contributing factor for this problem, making it urgent to identify effective methods to decrease stress at the workplace. The aim of the study is to evaluate a participatory intervention to improve the psychosocial work environment and mental health using an embedded mixed methods design. The study is a controlled trial with a parallel process evaluation exploring fidelity and participants’ reactions to the intervention activities, experiences of learning and changes in behaviours and work routines. We collected data through documentation, interviews and three waves of questionnaires. Our results show small changes in behaviours and work routines and no positive effects of the intervention on the psychosocial work environment nor health outcomes. One explanation is end-users’ perceived lack of involvement over the process causing the intervention to be seen as a burden. Another explanation is that the intervention activities were perceived targeting the wrong organisational level. A representative participation over both content and process can be an effective strategy to change psychosocial working conditions and mental health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Article
Manual Material Handling Training: The Effect of Self-Observation, Hetero-Observational and Intrinsic Feedback on Workers’ Knowledge and Behaviour
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8095; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218095 - 03 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1334
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the effect of systematic self-observation, hetero-observational feedback, and feedforward and intrinsic feedback (SsObserWork components) on workers’ knowledge and behaviour of a manual material handling (MMH) technique in the industrial sector. Blue-collar workers recruited from a food processing company [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess the effect of systematic self-observation, hetero-observational feedback, and feedforward and intrinsic feedback (SsObserWork components) on workers’ knowledge and behaviour of a manual material handling (MMH) technique in the industrial sector. Blue-collar workers recruited from a food processing company in Catalonia (Spain) were randomized into SsObserWork (N = 31) and control (N = 30) groups. SsObserWork group members participated individually in two sessions and a three-week follow-up between sessions where they received the SsObserWork components. The control group participated individually in two sessions where they received a standard MMH training. An ad hoc instrumentcalled the MMH-SsObserWork instrument was used to assess the MMH behaviour, and an adaption of the instrument was done to assess the workers’ knowledge. Significant differences were found between groups for the identification of recommended back positions in the first session and also on comparing both sessions. However, no differences were found for the rest of the criteria. There also were significant differences between groups in the score changes of the back, knee joints, elbow joints, and interaction criterion, indicating that the SsObserWork group improved the MMH performance in these criteria (behaviour). SsObserWork intervention showed a positive effect on improving the knowledge and behaviour of the MMH technique, specifically on back posture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Article
Evaluation of the Effects of a Bullying at Work Intervention for Middle Managers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7566; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207566 - 18 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1251
Abstract
The aim of the study is to evaluate the effects of a workplace bullying intervention based on the training of middle managers regarding bullying awareness, the consequences of bullying, strategies in conflict resolution and mediation/negotiation abilities. Overall, 142 randomly selected middle managers participated [...] Read more.
The aim of the study is to evaluate the effects of a workplace bullying intervention based on the training of middle managers regarding bullying awareness, the consequences of bullying, strategies in conflict resolution and mediation/negotiation abilities. Overall, 142 randomly selected middle managers participated in the study. First, participants completed an information record and two scales assessing bullying strategies, role conflict and role ambiguity. The last two scales were completed again in a second phase three months after the intervention had finished. The intervention produced a decrease in the following bullying strategies: effects on self-expression and communication, effects on personal reputation and effects on occupational situation and quality of life, with all of the mentioned bullying strategies being suffered by part of the sample. In addition, the conflict role decreased in the group which received the intervention. Moreover, the decrease in the effects of the bullying strategy effects on occupational situation and quality of life was especially important in managers with higher responsibilities within the workplace. Results are discussed in the framework that (1) leadership practices and, more specifically, conflict resolution skills are strongly responsible for bullying at work; and (2) the importance of intervening in the early stages of the bullying process as a key element in the correction, but also as a potential prevention element, of bullying in the workplace. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Article
Is a CSR Policy an Equally Effective Vaccine Against Workplace Mobbing and Psychosocial Stressors?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7292; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197292 - 06 Oct 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1159
Abstract
In this study, the problem question was raised whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) is/can be an effective tool against workplace mobbing and psychosocial stressors in organizations. Therefore, the purpose of the study is to determine the prevalence of workplace mobbing in Lithuanian and [...] Read more.
In this study, the problem question was raised whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) is/can be an effective tool against workplace mobbing and psychosocial stressors in organizations. Therefore, the purpose of the study is to determine the prevalence of workplace mobbing in Lithuanian and Polish organizations in order to compare in which organizations the manifestation of the phenomenon is the strongest and analyzing psychosocial stressors in parallel. To achieve the purpose, 823 employees of three types of organizations were surveyed. The respondents belonged to organizations that implement the principles of corporate social responsibility, organizations that intend to become socially responsible and organizations that do not implement corporate social responsibility and do not seek to become socially responsible. The empirical study was conducted using the questionnaire “Mobbing as a Psychosocial Stressor in the Organizations Accessing and Implementing Corporate Social Responsibility—MOB-CSR”. This questionnaire is valid and reliable; the correlation relationships between subscales show interconnectedness and statistically reliable relationships. The research results were calculated using the chi-squared test and the linear regression model. Statistically reliable relationships were found between the prevalence of workplace mobbing, psychosocial work stressors and corporate social responsibility. The results of the study show that along with the weakening of variables of corporate social responsibility, the probability of workplace mobbing is increasing but CSR in itself does not ensure the prevention of workplace mobbing in the case of Lithuanian and Polish organizations. If the findings of the study are considered by the managers of organizations, this can affect both employees’ quality of life towards improvement and more transparent/purposeful implementation of corporate social responsibility, i.e., responding to the true meaning of CSR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
Article
Process Evaluation of a Participative Organizational Intervention as a Stress Preventive Intervention for Employees in Swedish Primary Health Care
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7285; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197285 - 06 Oct 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2318
Abstract
This study is a process evaluation of a trial examining the effects of an organizational intervention (Productivity Measurement and Enhancement System or ProMES) on employee stress. The aims were to explore the implementation process and fidelity to the intervention guidelines, examine the influence [...] Read more.
This study is a process evaluation of a trial examining the effects of an organizational intervention (Productivity Measurement and Enhancement System or ProMES) on employee stress. The aims were to explore the implementation process and fidelity to the intervention guidelines, examine the influence of contextual factors (hindrances and facilitators) and explore participants’ experience of working with ProMES. We used the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) guidance to guide the process evaluation. The recruitment, reach and dose delivered were satisfactory and participation high. The employees felt ProMES clarified priorities, gave control and increased participation in decision-making. However, difficulty in obtaining statistical productivity data from the central administration office (a central feature of the intervention) hindered full implementation and regular feedback meetings. Staffing shortages interfered with the implementation process, while having seven design teams and one consultant prevented all occupational groups from working simultaneously. A detailed examination of access to necessary organizational data should be undertaken before implementing ProMES. We recommend a better introduction for new employees, more work on design and packaging and giving employees more training in how to use the software program. The study contributes to our understanding of process evaluations in research into organizational stress management interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Article
Insomnia Interventions in the Workplace: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6401; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176401 - 02 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1962
Abstract
The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to identify and evaluate the impact of interventions to improve or reduce insomnia in the workforce through randomized clinical trials. Following the recommendations of the PRISMA and MARS statement, a systematic literature search was [...] Read more.
The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to identify and evaluate the impact of interventions to improve or reduce insomnia in the workforce through randomized clinical trials. Following the recommendations of the PRISMA and MARS statement, a systematic literature search was carried out on the PubMed, Web of Science, CINHAL, and PsycINFO databases, with no restrictions on the language or publication date. For the meta-analysis, a random-effects model and the Insomnia Severity Index were used as outcome measures. To assess the risk of bias and the quality of evidence, the Cochrane Collaboration tool and the GRADE method were used, respectively. Twenty-two studies were included in the systematic review and 12 studies in the meta-analysis, making a total of 14 intervention groups with a sample of 827 workers. Cognitive behavioral therapy was the most widely used intervention. According to the estimated difference between the means, a moderate effect for the reduction of insomnia symptoms after the intervention (MD −2.08, CI 95%: [−2.68, −1.47]) and a non-significant degree of heterogeneity were obtained (p = 0.64; I2 = 0%). The quality of the evidence and the risk of bias were moderate. The results suggest that interventions on insomnia in the workplace are effective for improving workers’ health, and that improvements in the quality of sleep and a decrease in the symptoms of insomnia are produced, thanks to an increase in weekly sleeping hours and a reduction in latency at sleep onset. As regards work, they also led to improvements in productivity, presenteeism, and job burnout. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Article
Sense of Coherence, Health, Well-Being, and Work Satisfaction before and after Implementing Activity-Based Workplaces
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5250; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145250 - 21 Jul 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1481
Abstract
Activity-based workplaces (ABWs) are implemented with possible implications for health, well-being, and work satisfaction in the workplace. Drawing on the theoretical framework, i.e., sense of coherence (SOC), the aim was to investigate how indicators pf SOC—meaningfulness, manageability and comprehensibility—are associated with, or function [...] Read more.
Activity-based workplaces (ABWs) are implemented with possible implications for health, well-being, and work satisfaction in the workplace. Drawing on the theoretical framework, i.e., sense of coherence (SOC), the aim was to investigate how indicators pf SOC—meaningfulness, manageability and comprehensibility—are associated with, or function as barriers or facilitators for, health, well-being and work satisfaction during relocation to an ABW. We followed the implementation of ABWs at the Swedish Transport Administration (2018–2019). Questionnaires were administered before (n = 536), 3 months (n = 409) and 9 months (n = 373) after relocation. Focus group interviews (15) were conducted before and after. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and content analysis. Relocation to an ABW was associated with a reduced work satisfaction (physical p < 0.001; psychosocial p < 0.001), and minor changes in health and occupational well-being during relocation (p > 0.001). The reduction in work satisfaction was smaller among employees with high meaningfulness in the relocation process (p < 0.001). All SOC indicators were positively associated with overall health, well-being and work satisfaction (p < 0.001). Interviews suggested that meaningfulness was facilitated by participation in the presented activities and that communication before relocation was crucial. The results indicate that organizations implementing ABWs should promote perceived meaningfulness in the process to mitigate possible declines in satisfaction with the physical and psychosocial work environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Article
Cost-Effectiveness of a Problem-Solving Intervention Aimed to Prevent Sickness Absence among Employees with Common Mental Disorders or Occupational Stress
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5234; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145234 - 20 Jul 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1274
Abstract
The cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness of a work-directed intervention implemented by the occupational health service (OHS) for employees with common mental disorders (CMD) or stress related problems at work were investigated. The economic evaluation was conducted in a two-armed clustered RCT. Employees received either [...] Read more.
The cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness of a work-directed intervention implemented by the occupational health service (OHS) for employees with common mental disorders (CMD) or stress related problems at work were investigated. The economic evaluation was conducted in a two-armed clustered RCT. Employees received either a problem-solving based intervention (PSI; n = 41) or care as usual (CAU; n = 59). Both were work-directed interventions. Data regarding sickness absence and production loss at work was gathered during a one-year follow-up. Bootstrap techniques were used to conduct a Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) and a Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) from both an employer and societal perspective. Intervention costs were lower for PSI than CAU. Costs for long-term sickness absence were higher for CAU, whereas costs for short-term sickness absence and production loss at work were higher for PSI. Mainly due to these costs, PSI was not cost-effective from the employer’s perspective. However, PSI was cost-beneficial from a societal perspective. CEA showed that a one-day reduction of long-term sickness absence costed on average €101 for PSI, a cost that primarily was borne by the employer. PSI reduced the socio-economic burden compared to CAU and could be recommended to policy makers. However, reduced long-term sickness absence, i.e., increased work attendance, was accompanied by employees perceiving higher levels of production loss at work and thus increased the cost for employers. This partly explains why an effective intervention was not cost-effective from the employer’s perspective. Hence, additional adjustments and/or support at the workplace might be needed for reducing the loss of production at work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Article
Business Results and Well-Being: An Engaging Leadership Intervention Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4515; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124515 - 23 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2181
Abstract
The present quasi-experimental study tested the business impact of a leadership development program focusing on psychological well-being through the satisfaction of basic psychological needs. Based on the concept of engaging leadership and self-determination theory, the 8-month program targeted midlevel team leaders of the [...] Read more.
The present quasi-experimental study tested the business impact of a leadership development program focusing on psychological well-being through the satisfaction of basic psychological needs. Based on the concept of engaging leadership and self-determination theory, the 8-month program targeted midlevel team leaders of the customer fulfilment center of a health systems multinational organization. The program was designed in co-creation between senior leadership and the team leaders that participated in the program. Outcomes showed positive business results through significant increases in a preselected key performance indicator and decreased employee absenteeism. Through changes in autonomy satisfaction and intrinsic motivation, the team leaders (N = 14) benefitted in a moderate to very large extent relative to a similar control group (N = 52). In contrast, team members (N = 148) displayed no such benefits. Specifically, higher levels of autonomy satisfaction are said to lead to higher levels of psychological well-being and motivation. Still, the link with business performance is absent in most organizational studies within self-determination theory, making the present study one of the first to fill this gap. The study discloses the program design, compares the effects to a relevant control group, evaluates the lessons learned, and provides practical suggestions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Article
The Impact of the Direct Participation of Workers on the Rates of Absenteeism in the Spanish Labor Environment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2477; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072477 - 05 Apr 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1201
Abstract
The aim of this research was to study the relationship between the different levels of direct participation of workers (passive, consultative or active-delegated) in risk prevention management with the levels of absenteeism in Spain. To this end, a transversal study was carried out [...] Read more.
The aim of this research was to study the relationship between the different levels of direct participation of workers (passive, consultative or active-delegated) in risk prevention management with the levels of absenteeism in Spain. To this end, a transversal study was carried out using microdata from the Second European Survey of Companies on New and Emerging Risks (ESENER-2-Spain, 2014) with a master population of 3162 work centres. A multinomial logistic regression model was carried out, with the dependent variable being the levels of absenteeism and the independent variables, the participation indicators and preventive management, calculating the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) between all the independent and control variables, with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% IC). The results obtained showed how the active-delegative participation of workers in the design and adoption of psychosocial risk prevention measures reported 2.33 less probabilities of having a very high or fairly high level of absenteeism (aOR = 0.43; 95%IC:0.27–0.69). However, having documented aspects of preventive management (plan, risk assessment, planning measures) did not have any impact on absenteeism levels, which shows that we can fall into an unrealistic institutional mirage of security with active policies of co-education or co-management being necessary to reduce absenteeism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Review

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Review
Effectiveness of Workplace Interventions for Improving Absenteeism, Productivity, and Work Ability of Employees: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 1901; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061901 - 14 Mar 2020
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4068
Abstract
To determine the effectiveness of workplace interventions and the most effective methodological design for the improvement of employee productivity, work ability, and absenteeism. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of workplace interventions was conducted (PROSPERO, CRD42018094083). The PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, and Cochrane [...] Read more.
To determine the effectiveness of workplace interventions and the most effective methodological design for the improvement of employee productivity, work ability, and absenteeism. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of workplace interventions was conducted (PROSPERO, CRD42018094083). The PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, and Cochrane databases were searched. RCTs from 2000 to 2017 and with employees (18–65 years) were selected. Then, intervention characteristics and work-related outcomes data were extracted. A total of 47 RCTs were included in the systematic review, and 19 RCTs (11 absenteeism, 7 productivity, and 5 work ability) were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that the effectiveness of workplace interventions for absenteeism was −1.56 (95% CI, −2.67 to −0.44) and −2.65 (95% CI, −4.49 to −0.81) considering only moderate quality RCTs. In contrast, only a few studies of workplace interventions for productivity and work ability were included, which was insufficient for determining the effectiveness and best design for improving these work outcomes. The workplace is an interesting environment to reduce absenteeism, and individualized and counseling interventions with <10 sessions/total were the most effective workplace intervention methodological design for reducing the absenteeism of employees. Future high-quality RCTs that also consider health risks should be implemented to strengthen the results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Other

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Brief Report
A Hybrid Effectiveness-Implementation Study of a Multi-Component Lighting Intervention for Hospital Shift Workers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9141; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239141 - 07 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1031
Abstract
Simple lighting solutions may mitigate the harmful effects of shiftwork. This hybrid effectiveness–implementation study evaluated a multi-component lighting intervention in hospital nurses that included 6500 K architectural lighting in the nurses’ station plus optional behavioral components (a lightbox, blueblocker glasses, eyemasks) with instruction [...] Read more.
Simple lighting solutions may mitigate the harmful effects of shiftwork. This hybrid effectiveness–implementation study evaluated a multi-component lighting intervention in hospital nurses that included 6500 K architectural lighting in the nurses’ station plus optional behavioral components (a lightbox, blueblocker glasses, eyemasks) with instruction about appropriately timed usage. Selective improvements from baseline were observed in on-shift performance, sleep quality, and caffeine consumption in day workers (all p < 0.05); off-shift sleepiness scores improved for night workers (p < 0.05). Further, self-reported measures of quality of life improved for both groups (p < 0.05). Preliminary implementation data from interviews and questionnaires suggest perceived benefits and high acceptability of the intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Concept Paper
H-WORK Project: Multilevel Interventions to Promote Mental Health in SMEs and Public Workplaces
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8035; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218035 - 31 Oct 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2607
Abstract
The paper describes the study design, research questions and methods of a large, international intervention project aimed at improving employee mental health and well-being in SMEs and public organisations. The study is innovative in multiple ways. First, it goes beyond the current debate [...] Read more.
The paper describes the study design, research questions and methods of a large, international intervention project aimed at improving employee mental health and well-being in SMEs and public organisations. The study is innovative in multiple ways. First, it goes beyond the current debate on whether individual- or organisational-level interventions are most effective in improving employee health and well-being and tests the cumulative effects of multilevel interventions, that is, interventions addressing individual, group, leader and organisational levels. Second, it tailors its interventions to address the aftermaths of the Covid-19 pandemic and develop suitable multilevel interventions for dealing with new ways of working. Third, it uses realist evaluation to explore and identify the working ingredients of and the conditions required for each level of intervention, and their outcomes. Finally, an economic evaluation will assess both the cost-effectiveness analysis and the affordability of the interventions from the employer perspective. The study integrates the training transfer and the organisational process evaluation literature to develop toolkits helping end-users to promote mental health and well-being in the workplace. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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Concept Paper
Promoting Evidence-Based Practice for Improved Occupational Safety and Health at Workplaces in Sweden. Report on a Practice-Based Research Network Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5283; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155283 - 22 Jul 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2336
Abstract
Despite the rapid growth in research and R&D expenditures, the translation of research into practice is limited. One approach to increase the translation and utilization of research is practice based research networks. With the aim of strengthening evidence-based practice (EBP) within occupational health [...] Read more.
Despite the rapid growth in research and R&D expenditures, the translation of research into practice is limited. One approach to increase the translation and utilization of research is practice based research networks. With the aim of strengthening evidence-based practice (EBP) within occupational health services in Sweden (OH-Services), a practice-based research network (PBRN-OSH) was developed. The PBRN-OSH includes researchers and representatives from end-users. This paper reports on the development, outputs and lessons learned in the PBRN-OSH. The PBRN-OSH resulted in several practice-based research projects as well as different measures to ensure EBP in OSH such as the governmentally sanctioned national guidelines for the OH-services. Moreover, results show that the competence in EBP increased among practitioners at the OH-services. Conducting research in a PBRN is more resource demanding; however, this does not imply that it is less cost effective. To succeed in increasing the utility of research findings via PBRN, resources must be invested into an infrastructure that supports collaboration in the PBRN, including costs for a variety of means of dissemination. Further, translation activities need to be included in academic career paths and reward systems if a major improvement in the impact and return of investments from research is to be expected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Interventions)
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