Special Issue "The Effects of Air Pollution and Traffic Exposure in the General Population"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jaime Hart
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA
Interests: environmental epidemiology; spatial and contextual exposures; geographic information systems; air pollution; greenness; external exposome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am organizing a Special Issue on the impacts of air pollution and/or traffic-related exposures on health (with a focus on general population studies/cohorts) in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, please go to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Exposures to air pollution remain a key determinant of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Research in this area has been instrumental in setting policies worldwide, however, data is still needed in many countries around the world, and on understudied diseases. More information is also needed on how traffic-related exposures (including air pollution) interact with other aspects of the environment (e.g., temperature, humidity, greenness, urban form) to impact health in the general population. Intervention studies are also needed to provide examples of how changes in behaviors or in exposures can lead to changes in health outcomes. 

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to the impacts of air pollution or traffic exposures on public health. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Dr. Jaime Hart
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Particulate matter
  • Nitrogen oxides
  • Ozone
  • Environmental exposure
  • Emissions
  • Traffic noise
  • External exposome
  • Urban exposures
  • Rural exposures
  • Intervention studies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Impact of PM10 Levels on Pedestrian Volume: Findings from Streets in Seoul, South Korea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4833; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234833 - 01 Dec 2019
Abstract
Although many studies have revealed that both air quality and walking activity are dominant contributors to public health, little is known about the relationship between them. Moreover, previous studies on this subject have given little consideration to the day-to-day atmospheric conditions and floating [...] Read more.
Although many studies have revealed that both air quality and walking activity are dominant contributors to public health, little is known about the relationship between them. Moreover, previous studies on this subject have given little consideration to the day-to-day atmospheric conditions and floating populations of surrounding areas even though most pedestrian count surveys are not conducted on a single day. Against this backdrop, using the 2015 Pedestrian Volume Survey data and quasi-real-time weather, air quality, and transit ridership data in Seoul, this study investigates the relationship between particulate matter (PM)10 and pedestrian street volumes empirically. The regression results suggest that PM10 concentration determines people’s intention to walk and affects the volume of street-level pedestrians. The three regression models, which adopted different spatial aggregation units of air quality, demonstrated that PM10 elasticity of pedestrian volume is the largest in the borough-level (the smallest spatial unit of air quality alert) model. This means that people react to the most accurate information they can access, implying that air quality information should be provided in smaller spatial units for public health. Thus, strengthening air quality warning standards of PM is an effective measure for enhancing public health. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Urban Air Pollution Particulates Suppress Human T-Cell Responses to Mycobacterium Tuberculosis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4112; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214112 - 25 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Tuberculosis (TB) and air pollution both contribute significantly to the global burden of disease. Epidemiological studies show that exposure to household and urban air pollution increase the risk of new infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and the development of TB in persons infected [...] Read more.
Tuberculosis (TB) and air pollution both contribute significantly to the global burden of disease. Epidemiological studies show that exposure to household and urban air pollution increase the risk of new infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and the development of TB in persons infected with M.tb and alter treatment outcomes. There is increasing evidence that particulate matter (PM) exposure weakens protective antimycobacterial host immunity. Mechanisms by which exposure to urban PM may adversely affect M.tb-specific human T cell functions have not been studied. We, therefore, explored the effects of urban air pollution PM2.5 (aerodynamic diameters ≤2.5µm) on M.tb-specific T cell functions in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). PM2.5 exposure decreased the capacity of PBMC to control the growth of M.tb and the M.tb-induced expression of CD69, an early surface activation marker expressed on CD3+ T cells. PM2.5 exposure also decreased the production of IFN-γ in CD3+, TNF-α in CD3+ and CD14+ M.tb-infected PBMC, and the M.tb-induced expression of T-box transcription factor TBX21 (T-bet). In contrast, PM2.5 exposure increased the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD3+ and CD14+ PBMC. Taken together, PM2.5 exposure of PBMC prior to infection with M.tb impairs critical antimycobacterial T cell immune functions. Full article
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