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Special Issue "Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Einar B. Thorsteinsson

Psychology, University of New England, Armidale NSW 2351, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61-2-6773-2587
Interests: health psychology; adolescent coping; social support; wellbeing; depression; cardiovascular reactivity; stress
Guest Editor
Dr. Natasha Loi

Lecturer in Psychology, School of Psychology, University of New England Armidale NSW 2351, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61-2-6773-3903
Interests: workplace incivility and deviance; wellbeing; positive psychology; environment; health; emotional intelligence; self-efficacy; and social support

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on stress, coping, and resilience in adolescents in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

It is important to understand the factors (e.g., physical activity, diet, social media use, and environment) that contribute to adolescents’ mental and physical health and the mediators and moderators of these relationships. Improved theoretical modelling should improve any programs (e.g., educational) that are run for the benefit of adolescents. Thus, research into these and related areas should focus on methods of improving the public health of adolescents.

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to adolescent stress, coping, or resilience. The listed keywords suggest a few of the many possibilities.

Dr. Einar Thorsteinsson
Dr. Natasha Loi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Stress
  • Coping
  • Resilience
  • Adolescents
  • Social support
  • Cross-cultural
  • Public health
  • Health geography
  • Quality of life
  • Wellbeing
  • Sexual orientation
  • Internet use
  • Diet
  • Mental health
  • Physical health

Published Papers (17 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Fear of Terror and Psychological Well-Being: The Moderating Role of Emotional Intelligence
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2554; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112554
Received: 25 August 2018 / Revised: 8 November 2018 / Accepted: 8 November 2018 / Published: 14 November 2018
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to empirically explore whether or not the level of emotional intelligence of adolescents mitigates the potential adverse effects of the fear of terror on their psychological well-being. Data for this study were collected through a voluntary survey
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The purpose of this study was to empirically explore whether or not the level of emotional intelligence of adolescents mitigates the potential adverse effects of the fear of terror on their psychological well-being. Data for this study were collected through a voluntary survey from a sample of 385 adolescents residing in the terrorism-affected provinces of Pakistan: Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) and Balochistan. The results from the structural equation modeling revealed that fear of terrorism had a significant negative relationship with the psychological well-being of adolescents. The study results further revealed that emotional intelligence significantly moderated the relationship between the fear of terrorism and the psychological well-being of the adolescents. Therefore, the negative relationship was stronger for those with low emotional intelligence and weaker for those with high emotional intelligence. This study also discusses several practical implications along with suggestions for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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Open AccessArticle A Media-Based School Intervention to Reduce Sexual Orientation Prejudice and Its Relationship to Discrimination, Bullying, and the Mental Health of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adolescents in Western Canada: A Population-Based Evaluation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2447; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112447
Received: 3 September 2018 / Revised: 30 October 2018 / Accepted: 30 October 2018 / Published: 2 November 2018
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Abstract
School interventions to address sexual orientation discrimination can be important tools for fostering inclusive school climate, and improving student wellbeing. In this study, we empirically evaluated a film-based intervention, Out in Schools, designed to reduce sexual orientation prejudice and foster inclusive school attitudes.
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School interventions to address sexual orientation discrimination can be important tools for fostering inclusive school climate, and improving student wellbeing. In this study, we empirically evaluated a film-based intervention, Out in Schools, designed to reduce sexual orientation prejudice and foster inclusive school attitudes. Our evaluation mapped data about Out in Schools presentations onto student data from the random cluster-stratified, province-wide 2013 British Columbia Adolescent Health Survey (BCAHS) as well as potential confounding variables of Gay-Straight Alliance clubs (GSAs) and inclusive school policies. Outcome measures included past year sexual orientation discrimination, bullying, suicidal ideation, and school connectedness among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) and heterosexual (HET) students in grades 8 through 12 (ages 13 to 18; unweighted N = 21,075, weighted/scaled N = 184,821). Analyses used complex samples logistic regression, adjusted for sample design, conducted separately by gender and orientation. We found Out in Schools presentations were associated with reduced odds of LGB students experiencing discrimination, and both LGB and HET girl students being bullied or considering suicide, and increased levels of school connectedness, even after controlling for GSAs and policies. Out in Schools appears to have an additive contribution to reducing orientation prejudice and improving LGB and heterosexual student wellbeing within schools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
Open AccessArticle Adolescents’ Psychological Well-Being: A Multidimensional Measure
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2325; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102325
Received: 23 August 2018 / Revised: 17 October 2018 / Accepted: 18 October 2018 / Published: 22 October 2018
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Abstract
Over the last few years, different theoretical approaches have emerged advocating for a positive understanding of adolescence, recognizing it as a stage characterized by plasticity, the acquisition of competences and the achievement of satisfactory levels of well-being and positive adjustment. Based on Ryff’s
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Over the last few years, different theoretical approaches have emerged advocating for a positive understanding of adolescence, recognizing it as a stage characterized by plasticity, the acquisition of competences and the achievement of satisfactory levels of well-being and positive adjustment. Based on Ryff’s multidimensional model of psychological well-being, this study aims: (1) to develop an adjusted measuring instrument for adolescents (Brief Scale of Psychological Well-Being for Adolescents), as well as analysing its psychometric properties; and (2) to conduct a descriptive analysis of the levels of psychological and subjective well-being among adolescent boys and girls. A sample of 1590 Andalusian adolescents (51% girls), aged between 13 and 19 years old participated in this study. The Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) showed the validity of the instrument, with a multidimensional factorial solution of four factors (self-acceptance, positive interpersonal relationships, autonomy and life development) with good levels of internal consistency. Descriptive analyses showed good scores of psychological and subjective well-being among the adolescents, with a significant impact of sex and age in both measures of well-being. The results are discussed in terms of the importance of considering adolescent well-being from a multidimensional view and the need to promote positive development from a multifactorial perspective which takes into account the diversity of the variables involved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
Open AccessArticle Differential Effect of Level of Self-Regulation and Mindfulness Training on Coping Strategies Used by University Students
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2230; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102230
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 2 October 2018 / Accepted: 4 October 2018 / Published: 11 October 2018
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Abstract
The purpose of this research was to verify, in a group of psychology students, whether mindfulness training in conjunction with the individual’s level of self-regulation behavior would produce a change in the use of coping strategies. A total of 38 students participated in
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The purpose of this research was to verify, in a group of psychology students, whether mindfulness training in conjunction with the individual’s level of self-regulation behavior would produce a change in the use of coping strategies. A total of 38 students participated in this study, with one experimental group and one control group, in a randomized controlled trial. Observation of the experimental group revealed a significant decrease in specific emotion-focused, negative coping strategies (preparing for the worst, resigned acceptance, emotional venting, and isolation), and a significant increase in specific problem-focused, positive coping (positive reappraisal and firmness, self-talk, help for action), in combination with students’ existing low-medium-high level of self-regulation. The importance and usefulness of mindfulness techniques in Higher Education is discussed, in conjunction with differences in university students’ level of self-regulation behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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Open AccessArticle School Demands and Coping Resources−Associations with Multiple Measures of Stress in Mid-Adolescent Girls and Boys
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2143; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102143
Received: 30 August 2018 / Revised: 26 September 2018 / Accepted: 27 September 2018 / Published: 29 September 2018
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Abstract
Stress, and stress-related health complaints, are common among young people, especially girls. Since studies have shown that school demands are an important driver of stress in adolescents, identifying if school-based resources can protect against stress is highly relevant. The aim of this study
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Stress, and stress-related health complaints, are common among young people, especially girls. Since studies have shown that school demands are an important driver of stress in adolescents, identifying if school-based resources can protect against stress is highly relevant. The aim of this study was to analyse task-related demands and task-related coping resources as aspects of the school work environment of potential relevance for stress in mid-adolescent girls and boys. The data came from “The School Stress and Support study” (TriSSS) conducted among students in grades 8 and 9 (aged 14–16 years). Self-reports of demands, coping resources, stress, as well as recurrent pain, were collected through questionnaires (n = 411). A subsample of students (n = 191–198) also provided salivary samples, which were analysed for the stress marker cortisol. Linear (OLS) and binary logistic regression analyses showed that higher demands were associated with more perceived stress, a higher likelihood of recurrent pain, and a lower cortisol awakening response. Greater coping resources were associated with less perceived stress and a lower likelihood of recurrent pain, but there was no association with cortisol. The strength of the associations differed by gender. The findings suggest that schools can promote student wellbeing by providing clear and timely information and teacher support to the students, especially for boys. Identifying specific features of the schoolwork that give rise to stress and to modify these accordingly is also of importance, especially for girls. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
Open AccessArticle Major Stressors among Korean Adolescents According to Gender, Educational Level, Residential Area, and Socioeconomic Status
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2080; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102080
Received: 20 July 2018 / Revised: 16 September 2018 / Accepted: 19 September 2018 / Published: 21 September 2018
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Abstract
Adolescents are exposed to many stressors which have been associated with poor mental health. Using data from the 2015 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, we identified the major stressors among Korean adolescents based on gender, current educational level, residential area, and socioeconomic
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Adolescents are exposed to many stressors which have been associated with poor mental health. Using data from the 2015 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, we identified the major stressors among Korean adolescents based on gender, current educational level, residential area, and socioeconomic status (SES). The major stressors among girls were relationship- and appraisal-related factors, whereas boys more often reported health- and conflict-related factors. High school students more often reported academic performance and family circumstances as major stressors, whereas middle school students tended to report conflict-related factors. Urban adolescents reported academic performance and conflicts with parents as major stressors while rural adolescents reported conflicts with teachers and peer relationship problems. Finally, adolescents of lower SES reported multiple factors, including relational and family problems, as major stressors; contrarily, among those of higher SES, the primary stressor was uniquely related to academic performance. This result is significant in that adolescents’ stress levels, as well as the types of major stressors, vary depending on individual factors. It could also be beneficial for developing and implementing individualized and thus more efficient stress-management strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
Open AccessArticle Development and Validation of the Questionnaire of Academic Stress in Secondary Education: Structure, Reliability and Nomological Validity
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 2023; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15092023
Received: 23 August 2018 / Revised: 12 September 2018 / Accepted: 13 September 2018 / Published: 16 September 2018
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Abstract
This study presents the validation process of the Questionnaire on Academic Stress in Secondary Education (QASSE) designed to assess the wide variety of school sources and situations related to academic stress in adolescence, and their relationship with students’ physical and psychological well-being. The
[...] Read more.
This study presents the validation process of the Questionnaire on Academic Stress in Secondary Education (QASSE) designed to assess the wide variety of school sources and situations related to academic stress in adolescence, and their relationship with students’ physical and psychological well-being. The participants were 860 Spanish high school students (52.9% girls) with an average age of 14.62 years (SD = 1.8). Through a cross-validation process, results supported the QASSE multifactorial structure with four first-order factors—academic overload, interaction with classmates, family pressure, and future-oriented perspective—and a second-order factor of academic stress, showing a significant and intense relationship with adolescents’ psychological and physical well-being. Results also highlight the effects of the gender and educational level interaction on the students’ stress, with girls showing higher levels of stress in the transition courses between educational phases (sophomore and junior years). The QASSE demonstrates good validity and reliability, showing potential for both research and educational application. The results show the high impact of the QASSE dimensions on psychological and physical well-being in adolescence, highlighting its special usefulness for designing and adjusting educational prevention and intervention actions in this area to the students’ specific characteristics and needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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Open AccessArticle The Role of Psychosocial Stress on a Family-Based Treatment for Adolescents with Problematic Behaviors
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 1867; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15091867
Received: 26 July 2018 / Revised: 27 August 2018 / Accepted: 27 August 2018 / Published: 29 August 2018
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Abstract
The stressful life events experienced by adolescents with problematic behaviors, should be considered for implementing effective interventions. This study aimed to examine the adjustment of adolescents with problematic behaviors, and to assess the effectiveness of a family-based treatment, namely Scene-Based Psychodramatic Family Therapy
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The stressful life events experienced by adolescents with problematic behaviors, should be considered for implementing effective interventions. This study aimed to examine the adjustment of adolescents with problematic behaviors, and to assess the effectiveness of a family-based treatment, namely Scene-Based Psychodramatic Family Therapy (SB-PFT), according to different stress profiles. Ten SB-PFT sessions, over 17 trials were implemented. Stressful life events and adolescent adjustment were evaluated at pretest and posttest, for the SB-PFT participants (n = 104 adolescents) and a control group (n = 106). The adolescents were categorized into three profiles depending on the nature of the stressors: family stress profile, individual and family stress profile, and low stress profile. The individual and family stress group showed worse adjustment. Effectiveness analyses revealed improvements in SB-PFT participants’ emotional intelligence, but not in anger and hostility. Furthermore, adolescents with low and family-related stress profiles showed enhancements in parent attachment. In conclusion, interventions involving adolescents with problematic behaviors must be tailored to the stressful life events experienced. Specific treatments should be used alongside SB-PFT, when adolescents are met with individual-related stress. Nevertheless, SB-PFT seemed to promote emotional intelligence and parent attachment, particularly in adolescents with problematic behaviors that experienced only family stressors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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Open AccessArticle Prevailing over Adversity: Factors Counteracting the Long-Term Negative Health Influences of Social and Material Disadvantages in Youth
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 1842; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15091842
Received: 27 June 2018 / Revised: 21 August 2018 / Accepted: 24 August 2018 / Published: 27 August 2018
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Abstract
Disadvantaged circumstances in youth tend to translate into poor health development. However, the fact that this is not always the case has been seen as indicative of differential resilience. The current study highlights factors outside the context of the family with the potential
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Disadvantaged circumstances in youth tend to translate into poor health development. However, the fact that this is not always the case has been seen as indicative of differential resilience. The current study highlights factors outside the context of the family with the potential to counteract the long-term negative influences of social and material adversity in adolescence on general health status. This study was based on two waves of questionnaire data from the Northern Swedish Cohort. From the wave in 1981 (age 16), indicators of social and material conditions as well as factors related to school, peers, and spare time were derived. From the wave in 2008 (age 43), information about self-rated health was used. Ordinal logistic regression models (n = 908) showed that adversity in youth was associated with poorer self-rated health in midlife among men and women alike, net of health status at baseline. However, having an advantaged situation with regard to school, peers, or spare time appeared to protect against the detrimental influences of disadvantaged circumstances in the family context on subsequent health. This suggests that health-promoting interventions may benefit from focusing on contexts outside the family in their effort to strengthen processes of resilience among disadvantaged youths. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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Open AccessArticle Eat or Skip Breakfast? The Important Role of Breakfast Quality for Health-Related Quality of Life, Stress and Depression in Spanish Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1781; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081781
Received: 28 July 2018 / Revised: 14 August 2018 / Accepted: 15 August 2018 / Published: 19 August 2018
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Abstract
This study examined the associations between eating or skipping breakfast and the quality of breakfast eaten on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), perceived stress and depression in 527 Spanish adolescents. Results showed differences in stress and two domains of HRQOL; Moods and Emotions
[...] Read more.
This study examined the associations between eating or skipping breakfast and the quality of breakfast eaten on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), perceived stress and depression in 527 Spanish adolescents. Results showed differences in stress and two domains of HRQOL; Moods and Emotions and Parent Relations and Home Life between adolescent breakfast skippers and eaters, those having breakfast showing higher levels of stress and poor HRQOL. When breakfast quality was analyzed in breakfast eaters, adolescents who ate a good quality breakfast showed better HRQOL and lower levels of stress and depression than those who ate a poor or very poor quality breakfast. Further, breakfast skippers showed better HRQOL and lower levels of stress and depression than breakfast eaters who ate a poor or very poor quality breakfast. These findings indicate the importance of eating a good quality breakfast, rather than just having or not having breakfast. The conclusions of the present study are especially relevant for clinicians and nutritional educators, given the significant impact of breakfast quality on health-related quality of life, stress and depression observed in the adolescents studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
Open AccessArticle Comorbidity of Physical and Anxiety Symptoms in Adolescent: Functional Impairment, Self-Rated Health and Subjective Well-Being
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1698; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081698
Received: 17 June 2018 / Revised: 3 August 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 9 August 2018
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Abstract
Physical disorders and anxiety are frequently comorbid. This study investigates the characteristics of physical disorders, self-rated heath, subjective well-being and anxiety in adolescents. Data were drawn from the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe cohort study. From 11 countries 11,230 adolescents, aged
[...] Read more.
Physical disorders and anxiety are frequently comorbid. This study investigates the characteristics of physical disorders, self-rated heath, subjective well-being and anxiety in adolescents. Data were drawn from the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe cohort study. From 11 countries 11,230 adolescents, aged 14–16 years were included. Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), WHO-5 Well-Being Index and five questions prepared for this study to evaluate physical illnesses and self-rated heath were administered. Anxiety levels were significantly higher in adolescents who reported having physical disability (p < 0.001, Cohen’s d = 0.40), suffering from chronic illnesses (p < 0.001, Cohen’s d = 0.40), impairments associated to health conditions (p < 0.001, Cohen’s d = 0.61), or reported poor to very poor self-rated health (p < 0.001, Cohen’s d = 1.11). Mediational analyses revealed no direct effect of having a chronic illness/physical disability on subjective well-being, but the indirect effects through higher levels of anxiety were significant. Functional impairment related to health conditions was both directly and indirectly (through higher levels of anxiety) associated with lower well-being. The co-occurrence of anxiety and physical disorders may confer a greater level of disability and lower levels of subjective well-being. Clinicians have to screen anxiety, even in a subthreshold level in patients with choric physical illness or with medically unexplained physical symptoms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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Open AccessArticle Poor Dietary Habits in Bullied Adolescents: The Moderating Effects of Diet on Depression
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1569; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081569
Received: 28 June 2018 / Revised: 20 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 24 July 2018
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Abstract
The prevalence of bullying has increased dramatically during recent years, with numerous negative consequences for the health and quality of life of bullied adolescents. Although negative psychological consequences of this type of situation have been widely investigated, no previous research has evaluated the
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The prevalence of bullying has increased dramatically during recent years, with numerous negative consequences for the health and quality of life of bullied adolescents. Although negative psychological consequences of this type of situation have been widely investigated, no previous research has evaluated the effects of bullying victimization on dietary habits, and its relationship with psychological outcomes, such as depression. For this reason, the main aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between bullying, dietary habits, and depression in a sample of 527 Spanish adolescents. The results obtained showed that being bullied was correlated negatively with healthy dietary habits and positively with depression. Moderation analysis revealed dietary habits as moderator of the association between bullying and depression. These results underline the relevance of diet in the phenomenon of bullying, especially in victims, as could be related to the high levels of depression characteristic of this population. The inclusion of nutritional education in intervention programs oriented to victims of bullying might significantly improve their efficacy, reducing depression levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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Open AccessArticle The Problem with Low-Prevalence of Bullying
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1535; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071535
Received: 2 June 2018 / Revised: 7 July 2018 / Accepted: 10 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
This paper tests the hypothesis of whether being bullied in an environment where bullying is infrequent decreases adolescents’ life satisfaction. Analyses were based on the international standard questionnaire from the 2005/2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study (HBSC). The sample included answers from
[...] Read more.
This paper tests the hypothesis of whether being bullied in an environment where bullying is infrequent decreases adolescents’ life satisfaction. Analyses were based on the international standard questionnaire from the 2005/2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study (HBSC). The sample included answers from 183,736 children in 35 Western, industrialized countries. Our results show that the negative effects of being bullied on the life satisfaction of individuals are stronger in schools and countries where bullying is less frequent. We therefore conclude that the prevalence of bullying in the students’ surroundings may act as a mediating variable explaining the relationship between bullying and life satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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Open AccessArticle Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effectiveness of Depression and Anxiety Prevention for Adolescents with a High Familial Risk
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1457; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071457
Received: 14 June 2018 / Revised: 6 July 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 10 July 2018
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Abstract
A randomized controlled trail was conducted to examine the effectiveness of a depression and anxiety prevention program ‘Een Sprong Vooruit’ (A Leap Forward) among adolescent girls with a high familial risk (N = 142). The results showed neither effects of the prevention
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A randomized controlled trail was conducted to examine the effectiveness of a depression and anxiety prevention program ‘Een Sprong Vooruit’ (A Leap Forward) among adolescent girls with a high familial risk (N = 142). The results showed neither effects of the prevention program directly after the intervention, nor at 6 or 12 months follow-up on depression and anxiety symptoms. Further, latent growth curve modeling (LGCM) was used to examine whether the growth functions for the intervention and the control condition were different. The slope representing the change in depression symptoms was not significantly different between the intervention and the control condition. For anxiety symptoms, the difference between slopes was also not significant. Based on these results, we suggested that these high-risk adolescent girls might benefit more from a more intensive prevention program. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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Open AccessArticle Reloading Pupils’ Batteries: Impact of Green Spaces on Cognition and Wellbeing
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1205; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061205
Received: 12 April 2018 / Revised: 5 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 June 2018 / Published: 8 June 2018
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Abstract
Cognitive functioning and academic performance of pupils depend on regular breaks from classroom work. However, it is unclear which settings during such breaks provide the best environment to restore cognitive performance and promote wellbeing of adolescent pupils. Therefore, we investigated the effects of
[...] Read more.
Cognitive functioning and academic performance of pupils depend on regular breaks from classroom work. However, it is unclear which settings during such breaks provide the best environment to restore cognitive performance and promote wellbeing of adolescent pupils. Therefore, we investigated the effects of staying in different urban green spaces during breaks. Sixty-four pupils (16–18 years old) participated in a cross-over experiment. They were placed into one of three settings (small park, larger park, forest) for one hour during a lunch break. Wellbeing was assessed four times (Nitsch scale), and a cognitive test (d2-R Test of Attention) was applied in the classrooms before and after the break. Wellbeing was almost always highest after the stay in the green spaces. However, a sustained effect was only found for the forest. Concentration performance values of the d2-R test were significantly higher after the pupils’ stay in green spaces for all sites. The highest increase of performance was found for the larger park type. In conclusion, this pilot study showed that study breaks in green spaces improved wellbeing and cognitive performance of adolescents. It also found that larger green spaces, either parks or forests, have stronger positive impacts on wellbeing and cognitive performance than small parks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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Open AccessArticle Emotional Intelligence and Its Relationship with Levels of Social Anxiety and Stress in Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1073; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061073
Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 17 May 2018 / Accepted: 24 May 2018 / Published: 25 May 2018
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Abstract
The aim of this work is to extend the research on the relationships between emotional intelligence and various indicators of subjective well-being in adolescents, such as stress and social anxiety. The existence of differences in stress and social anxiety as a function of
[...] Read more.
The aim of this work is to extend the research on the relationships between emotional intelligence and various indicators of subjective well-being in adolescents, such as stress and social anxiety. The existence of differences in stress and social anxiety as a function of an emotional intelligence score is also analyzed. A total of 505 Spanish adolescents between the ages of 12 and 18 participated in the study. The results obtained support the existence of a positive relationship between trait emotional intelligence and subjective well-being. Likewise, the existence of a negative association between emotional intelligence and stress, and emotional intelligence and social anxiety, is confirmed. These results are consistent with other similar works based on adolescent samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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Open AccessArticle A Theoretical and Empirical Linkage between Road Accidents and Binge Eating Behaviors in Adolescence
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 355; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020355
Received: 27 December 2017 / Revised: 13 February 2018 / Accepted: 15 February 2018 / Published: 17 February 2018
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Abstract
This study aimed at identifying specific clusters of maladaptive emotional–behavioral symptoms in adolescent victims of motorbike collisions considering their scores on alexithymia and impulsivity in addition to examining the prevalence of clinical binge eating behaviors (respectively through the Youth Self-Report (YSR), Toronto Alexithymia
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This study aimed at identifying specific clusters of maladaptive emotional–behavioral symptoms in adolescent victims of motorbike collisions considering their scores on alexithymia and impulsivity in addition to examining the prevalence of clinical binge eating behaviors (respectively through the Youth Self-Report (YSR), Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11), and Binge Eating Scale (BES)). Emotional–behavioral profiles, difficulties in identifying and describing feelings, impulsivity, and binge eating behaviors have been assessed in 159 adolescents addressing emergency departments following motorbike collisions. Our results showed a cluster of adolescents with clinical binge eating behaviors, high rates of motorbike accidents, and high levels of internalizing and externalizing problems, alexithymia, and impulsivity (23.3% of the sample); a second cluster of adolescents with clinical binge eating behaviors, a moderate number of collisions, and moderate levels of emotional and behavioral problems on the above four dimensions (25.8% of the sample); and a third cluster of youth without clinical binge eating behaviors, with a moderate number of accidents, and with low scores on the four dimensions (50.9% of the sample). Adolescents of Cluster 1 showed a higher likelihood to be involved in motorbike collisions than the youth in Clusters 2 and 3 (p < 0.0001). We suggest that adolescents’ motor collisions could be associated with their difficulties in emotion regulation and with their impaired psychological profiles, which could also underpin their disordered eating. The identification of specific clusters of psychopathological symptoms among this population could be useful for the construction of prevention and intervention programs aimed at reducing motor collision recidivism and alleviating co-occurring psychopathologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Coping, and Resilience in Adolescents)
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