Special Issue "Solar UV Radiation: A Neglected Occupational Risk"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Fabriziomaria Gobba
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena & Reggio Emilia, 41125 Modena, Italy
Interests: occupational medicine; occupational diseases; non-ionizing radiations (NIR): occupational exposure evaluation, adverse health effects in workers, and prevention; occupational skin cancer: epidemiology and prevention; visual function in workers: occupational risks to the eye, prevention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Occupational solar UV radiation (UVR) exposure certainly is one of the most widespread occupational risks, involving an enormous number of workers all around the world, but is also one of the most neglected. In fact, solar UVR can induce various acute and chronic adverse health effects, mainly (but not limited) to the skin and the eye. Solar UVR is the most important causal factor for skin cancer, including both non-melanoma skin cancer, the most frequent neoplasms in caucasians, and malignant melanoma. Furthermore, is a well-known risk factor for cataracts, still the main cause of visual impairment in the world, and for other corneal and retinal adverse effects. Outdoor workers are usually exposed to solar UV rays for the majority of their working days during their entire working life, and the effect is cumulative, considering the photochemical mechanism. Despite the fact the health risk related to solar UV is well known, no adequate preventive policies are implemented in the UN countries to protect exposed workers, including agricultural and construction workers, fishermen, gardeners, lifeguards, quarrymen, workers in the tourist sector, and others. The development of effective preventions deserves increased attention, especially on topics such as

  • The evaluation of occupational solar UV exposure levels in workers;
  • The epidemiology of solar UV related diseases in exposed workers;
  • The mechanisms of occupational solar UV-related damage and associated factors;
  • Possible preventive interventions to reduce occupational solar UV risk.

Accordingly, we invite submissions on the abovementioned topics, along with other related topics, for this Special Issue.

Prof. Fabriziomaria Gobba
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • occupational exposure
  • ultraviolet radiation
  • outdoor worker
  • UV damage
  • eye
  • skin
  • cancer
  • cataract
  • prevention
  • risk evaluation

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer in Outdoor Workers: A Study on Actinic Keratosis in Italian Navy Personnel
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2321; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072321 - 30 Mar 2020
Abstract
Occupational exposure to ultraviolet radiation is one of the main risk factors for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) development. The most common variants of NMSC are basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and actinic keratosis (AK). The latter is nowadays considered by most authors [...] Read more.
Occupational exposure to ultraviolet radiation is one of the main risk factors for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) development. The most common variants of NMSC are basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and actinic keratosis (AK). The latter is nowadays considered by most authors as an early squamous cell carcinoma rather than a precancerous lesion. Outdoor workers have a higher risk of developing NMSC because they spend most of the working day outside. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess the prevalence of skin lesions, especially AK, in a professional category of individuals exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation: the Italian Navy. From January to June 2016, a questionnaire and a total skin examination of 921 military personnel were administered by medical specialists (dermatologists) in seven different Italian Navy centres. AK was detected in 217 of 921 (23.5%) workers. Older age, outdoor occupation, longer working life, and fair skin seem to promote the development of AK. Of the 217 workers with AK, 187 (86.2%) had lesions in chronically sun-exposed skin areas. Italian Navy personnel have a high AK prevalence. Further studies are needed to investigate occupational hazards and their health effects among outdoor workers to promote protective behaviour and raise awareness of skin cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar UV Radiation: A Neglected Occupational Risk)
Open AccessArticle
UK Postal Delivery Workers’ Occupational Sun Safety: Using Behavior Change Theories to Identify Intervention Pathways
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3712; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193712 - 02 Oct 2019
Abstract
Postal delivery workers have substantial sun exposure. In the United Kingdom (UK) a high proportion of workers possesses a sun sensitive skin type. This population is at elevated risk for skin cancer, yet uptake of sun safety practices is low. Studies are needed [...] Read more.
Postal delivery workers have substantial sun exposure. In the United Kingdom (UK) a high proportion of workers possesses a sun sensitive skin type. This population is at elevated risk for skin cancer, yet uptake of sun safety practices is low. Studies are needed to identify the underlying factors that contribute to the uptake of occupational sun safety practices that may be targeted during behavior change interventions. This study integrated the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and the Transtheoretical Model’s stages of change (SoC) as guiding frameworks to identify underlying beliefs that influence UK postal delivery workers’ uptake of occupational sun safety practices. Thirty-four workers participated in semi-structured interviews that used the SoC to establish current receptiveness to and adoption of two sun safety practices (using sunscreen of at least sun protection factor (SPF) 30 on exposed skin and wearing a wide-brimmed hat when working outdoors in the summer). Beliefs underlying current practices were elicited in accordance with the TPB and stratified by the SoC. For sunscreen use and wearing a wide-brimmed hat, 64% and 3% of participants were in the action or maintenance SoC, respectively. Behavioral and control beliefs differed by SoC, with those in the earlier stages more likely than those in the latter stages to report negative attitudes to, and difficulty enacting, sun safety practices. Normative beliefs concerning the views of colleagues and employers towards sunscreen were relatively consistent across the SoC. This study highlights the need for tailored and targeted behavior change interventions. The SoC-stratified accounts of the influence of TPB components on behavior provide a basis for bespoke interventions that reflect inter-individual and inter-practice differences in their working mechanisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar UV Radiation: A Neglected Occupational Risk)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Sun Exposure of Body Districts: Development and Validation of an Algorithm to Predict the Erythemal Ultra Violet Dose
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3632; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193632 - 27 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Solar Ultra-Violet (UV) radiation has positive and negative effects on human body tissues. Small doses of solar UV radiation are needed by the human skin for the activation of the vitamin D production. Overexposure to solar UV radiation can produce acute and long-term [...] Read more.
Solar Ultra-Violet (UV) radiation has positive and negative effects on human body tissues. Small doses of solar UV radiation are needed by the human skin for the activation of the vitamin D production. Overexposure to solar UV radiation can produce acute and long-term negative effects, such as sunburns and, in the worst cases, cataracts and skin cancers. For this reason, knowing the amount of UV doses received by people is essential to evaluate their risk to UV overexposure and to evaluate the adequate countermeasure to avoid the negative effects. The original contribution of the present study consists in having searched, collected, adapted and processed a series of technical information and analytical relations, developing an algorithm suitable for the calculation of the erythemal UV dose on sloped surfaces exposed to solar radiation, which at the moment is not present in the scientific literature. The results obtained by the algorithm have been compared to the results of a field measurements campaign, carried out in three different Italian sites. Results comparison indicated that measured and calculated values show a sufficient level of agreement, with a mean absolute error equal to 20%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar UV Radiation: A Neglected Occupational Risk)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Occupational Exposure to Solar UV Radiation of a Group of Fishermen Working in the Italian North Adriatic Sea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 3001; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16163001 - 20 Aug 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Occupational solar radiation exposure is a relevant heath risk in the fishing sector. Our aim was to provide a detailed evaluation of individual UV exposure in three different fishing activities in Italy, with personal UV dosimeters and a simple formula to calculate the [...] Read more.
Occupational solar radiation exposure is a relevant heath risk in the fishing sector. Our aim was to provide a detailed evaluation of individual UV exposure in three different fishing activities in Italy, with personal UV dosimeters and a simple formula to calculate the fraction of ambient erythemal UV dose received by the workers. The potential individual UV exposure of the fishermen was between 65 and 542 Joules/m2. The percentages of the ambient exposure were estimated between 2.5% and 65.3%. Workers’ UV exposure was mainly influenced by the characteristics of the work activity, the postures adopted, and the type of boats. Overall, our data showed that 43% of the daily measurements could result largely above the occupational limits of 1–1.3 standard erythemal dose (i.e., 100 Joules/m2) per day, in case of exposure of uncovered skin areas. Measurements of individual UV exposure are important not only to assess the risk but also to increase workers’ perception and stimulate the adoption of preventive measures to reduce solar UV risk. Furthermore, the simple method proposed, linking ambient erythemal UV dose to the workers’ exposure, can be a promising tool for a reliable assessment of the UV risk, as time series of environmental UV dose are widely available. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar UV Radiation: A Neglected Occupational Risk)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop