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Special Issue "Social Anxiety and Psychophysical Health during COVID-19 Pandemic"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 January 2023) | Viewed by 2318

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Isabella Aquila
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Legal Medicine, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University “Magna Graecia” of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy
Interests: autopsy; forensic pathology; forensic medicine; legal medicine; forensic anthropology; forensics; osteology; forensic psychiatry; human anatomy; dissection
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Psychophysical balance is a fundamental issue in public health. In particular, mental health problems (anxiety, depression and related disorders) have increased in the COVID-19 era. The COVID-19 pandemic has also caused a condition of strong psychological stress, generating a common sense of uncertainty about the future in society. Since then, all of our lives have changed. In addition to the direct effects due to illness and economic problems, the pandemic inevitably caused social detachment, undermining the human need to socialize and favoring a strong individual dimension during quarantine. Numerous papers have reported many suicides that occurred during the lockdown period, evaluating the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic as a trigger for suicide, especially in vulnerable individuals with already present suicidal risk factors and negative outcomes of the health emergency on the state of public mental health. Many age groups are involved, and the clinical and diagnostic areas in which all this has a socio-psychological impact are diverse. Among young people, it is necessary to reflect on the difficulties in returning to socialization with peers and on the reconstruction of everyday life after a period of solitude. Therefore, in the post-COVID-19 era we also emphasize the frustration related to the perception of non-belonging to the group and to social standards, which is accentuated after a long period of isolation. There are also forensic profiles related to the psychological distress connected to this pandemic period. It is important to scientifically investigate all these aspects. In the post-COVID-19 era, the challenge for the coming months is the return to normality, intended not only as a definitive stop of the contagion but also as a new psychological and relational balance of the community. The topics of this Special Issue will concern: 

  • Social anxiety management
  • Analysis and diagnosis of social anxiety and psychophysical health
  • Treatment of anxiety
  • Management of suicide risk in pandemic era
  • Multidisciplinary assessment of social anxiety and psychophysical health
  • Psychological impact of COVID-19 on mental health
  • Forensic aspect of COVID-19 in mental disorder.

Regarding the prevention of suicide in the COVID-19 era, the specialized branches involved are forensic medicine and forensic pathology; pathological anatomy; pediatrics; general and specialist surgery; maxillofacial surgery; anesthesia and resuscitation; neurology; translational medicine; pulmonology; cardiology; infectious diseases; urology; physiatry; orthopedics; psychiatry; geriatrics; internal medicine; gynecology and obstetrics; gastroenterology and hepatology; nephrology; cardiac surgery; neurosurgery; toxicology; genetics; biology; psychology; clinical chemistry; computer engineering; sports medicine; rehabilitation medicine; neuroradiology; forensic entomology; forensic veterinary; forensic anthropology.

Dr. Isabella Aquila
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • social anxiety
  • psychophysical health
  • COVID-19
  • pandemic
  • social profile
  • social outcomes
  • mental health
  • diagnosis
  • autopsy
  • forensic pathology
  • psychophysical trauma
  • emergency
  • management of suicide
  • suicide
  • death
  • injury
  • radiological investigation
  • surgical intervention
  • sepsis
  • violent
  • abuse
  • psychological trauma
  • drugs
  • toxicology
  • treatment of mental disorders
  • treatment of anxiety
  • multidisciplinary profiles
  • pediatric psychological trauma
  • resuscitation
  • prevention
  • suicide risk

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Association of Digital Health Literacy with Future Anxiety as Mediated by Information Satisfaction and Fear of COVID-19: A Pathway Analysis among Taiwanese Students
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15617; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315617 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 679
Abstract
Digital Health Literacy (DHL) helps online users with navigating the infodemic and co-existing conspiracy beliefs to avoid mental distress and maintain well-being. We aimed to investigate the association between DHL and future anxiety (FA); and examine the potential mediation roles of information satisfaction [...] Read more.
Digital Health Literacy (DHL) helps online users with navigating the infodemic and co-existing conspiracy beliefs to avoid mental distress and maintain well-being. We aimed to investigate the association between DHL and future anxiety (FA); and examine the potential mediation roles of information satisfaction and fear of COVID-19 (F-CoV). A web-based cross-sectional survey was carried out among 1631 Taiwanese university students aged 18 years and above from June 2021 to March 2022. Data collected were socio-demographic characteristics (sex, age, social status, university location), information satisfaction, F-CoV, DHL and FA (using Future Dark scale). The linear regression model was used to explore factors associated with FA. The pathway analysis was further used to evaluate the direct and indirect relationship between DHL and FA. A higher score of DHL (B = −0.21; 95% CI, −0.37, −0.06; p = 0.006), and information satisfaction (B = −0.16; 95% CI, −0.24, −0.08; p < 0.001) were associated with a lower FA score, whereas a higher F-CoV score was associated with a higher FA score (B = 0.43; 95% CI, 0.36, 0.50; p < 0.001). DHL showed the direct impact (B = −0.1; 95% CI, −0.17, −0.04; p = 0.002) and indirect impact on FA as mediated by information satisfaction (B = −0.04; 95% CI, −0.06, −0.01; p = 0.002) and F-CoV (B = −0.06, 95% CI, −0.08, −0.04; p < 0.001). Strategic approaches to promote DHL, information satisfaction, lower F-CoV are suggested to reduce FA among students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Anxiety and Psychophysical Health during COVID-19 Pandemic)
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Article
Physical Activity Levels and Psychological Well-Being during COVID-19 Lockdown among University Students and Employees
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(18), 11234; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191811234 - 07 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1129
Abstract
During the lockdown for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), entire populations were instructed to live in home confinement. We investigated the effects of the COVID-19 lockdown on the physical activity (PA) and mental health of students and employees in a Colombian University. A [...] Read more.
During the lockdown for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), entire populations were instructed to live in home confinement. We investigated the effects of the COVID-19 lockdown on the physical activity (PA) and mental health of students and employees in a Colombian University. A cross-sectional study was conducted through an online survey during the first isolation. A total of 431 respondents (192 males) aged 18–60 years old (28.1 ± 11.1 years) participated. The international Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and the short version of the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI-S) were used. The lockdown had a negative effect on PA levels, with students exhibiting the greatest decrease (~34%; p ˂ 0.001) compared to employees (~24%; p ˂ 0.01). The analysis showed a greater change in PA behavior before and during the lockdown in highly active student participants (5750 vs. 5141 MET min/week; p < 0.05). Additionally, the psychological assessment revealed a lower score in students compared to employees in the male (70.1 vs. 82.6) and female groups (60.2 vs. 79.6). Moreover, the results revealed an influence of sex, with only the female students exhibiting a state of distress. Self-reported PA and psychological well-being were compromised during the COVID-19 lockdown in the academic community, with students and females being more affected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Anxiety and Psychophysical Health during COVID-19 Pandemic)
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