Special Issue "Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Laura A. Geer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, SUNY Downstate Medical Center School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA
Interests: The use of various exposure assessment methods to study perinatal exposure to chemicals. Epidemiologic study of the association between environmental and occupational exposures and health outcomes. Use of mobile technology in education of environmental pollutants and other built environment hazards, and in the assessment of hazards. Dermal exposure assessment in occupational and environmental settings, psychosocial risk factors of exposure, and risk assessment and communication.
Dr. Lori A. Hoepner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, SUNY Downstate Medical Center School of Public Health, New York, NY 11203, USA
Interests: endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs); plasticizers/plastic pollution; childhood obesity/adiposity; asthma; DOHaD; community-based environmental health; underserved populations; health disparities; urban health; hydraulic fracturing; big data
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite submissions to this Special Issue on “Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Health” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph

PAHs are a complex class of carcinogenic, endocrine disrupting chemicals found in indoor and outdoor air from a variety of stationery and mobile sources. Exposures to PAHs have been associated with respiratory effects including asthma and lung cancer, premature death, other cancers, obesity, neurodevelopmental delay, and epigenetic effects.

These compounds are released during incomplete combustion of various fuels. Common indoor sources are home heating fuels including biomass, tobacco smoke, and burning of candles and incense. They are also found in the diet as they form on blackened foods.

Particle-bound PAHs are widespread in ambient air from fossil fuel burning and other combustion sources.

Opportunity for human exposure is on the rise globally. The shift to urban centers worldwide leads to higher emissions of PAH from various mobile and stationary sources. With population density comes increasing demand to burn fuels for heating, cooking, and transportation, leading to increased human exposure in urban centers.

Dr. Laura A. Geer
Dr. Lori A. Hoepner
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Air Pollution
  • Traffic Density
  • Diesel Exhaust
  • Environmental Tobacco Smoke
  • Coal Burning
  • Wood Burning
  • Wildfires
  • Pulmonary Function Tests
  • Asthma
  • Lung Cancer
  • Pulmonary Disease
  • Wheeze
  • Obesity
  • Heating
  • Combustion Sources
  • Indoor Air
  • Outdoor Air
  • Biomass burning

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Correlation of Internal Exposure Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to Methylation of Imprinting Genes of Sperm DNA
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2606; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16142606 - 22 Jul 2019
Abstract
Human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) results in adverse health implications. However, the specific impact of paternal preconception PAHs exposure has not been fully studied. In this study, a total of 219 men aged 24–53 were recruited and an investigation was conducted [...] Read more.
Human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) results in adverse health implications. However, the specific impact of paternal preconception PAHs exposure has not been fully studied. In this study, a total of 219 men aged 24–53 were recruited and an investigation was conducted using a questionnaire requesting information about age, occupation, education, family history, lifestyle, and dietary preferences. Urine and semen samples were examined for the levels of the hydroxyl metabolites of PAHs (OH-PAHs) using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry and sperm DNA methylation by pyrosequencing. The results from the correlation analysis using seven OH-PAHs and the average methylation levels of the imprinting genes H19, PEG3, and MEG3 indicated that 1-OHPH is positively correlated with H19/PEG3 methylation levels. We further examined the correlation between each OH-PAH and the methylation levels at the individual CpGs. The results showed 1-OHPH is specifically correlated with CpG4 and CpG6 of the imprinted gene H19, CpG1 and CpG2 of PEG3, and CpG2 of MEG3; whereas 1-OHP is positively correlated with PEG3 at CpG1. Multivariate regression model analysis confirmed that 1-OHPH and 1-OHP are independent risk factors for the methylation of H19. These data show that sperm DNA imprinting genes are sensitive to adverse environmental perturbations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Biofilm Formed by Phenanthrene-Degrading Bacteria on Rice Root Surfaces for Reduction of PAH Contamination in Rice
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 2002; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16112002 - 05 Jun 2019
Abstract
One effective method in to reduce the uptake of organic contaminants by plants is the development of a root barrier. In this study, the characterization of biofilm structure and function by phenanthrene-degrading Pseudomonas sp. JM2-gfp on rice root surfaces were carried out. Our [...] Read more.
One effective method in to reduce the uptake of organic contaminants by plants is the development of a root barrier. In this study, the characterization of biofilm structure and function by phenanthrene-degrading Pseudomonas sp. JM2-gfp on rice root surfaces were carried out. Our results showed that root surfaces from three rice species, namely Liaojing401, Koshihikari, and Zhenzhuhong all present hydrophobicity and a high initial adhesion of strain JM2-gfp. Matured robust biofilm formation occurred at 48 h on the root surfaces. The biofilm exhibited cell dense aggregates and biomass embedded in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix. EPS composition results showed that the proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids are produced in the biofilm, while the content varied with rice species. Under the initial concentration of phenanthrene 50 mg·L−1, the residual phenanthrene in plant roots from ‘Zhengzhuhong’, ‘Koshihikari’ and ‘Liaojing401’ with biofilm mediated were significantly decreased by 71.9%, 69.3% and 58.7%, respectively, compared to those without biofilm groups after 10 days of exposure. Thus, the biofilm colonized on roots plays an important role of degradation in order to reduce the level of phenanthrene uptake of plants. Thereby, the present work provides significant new insights into lowering the environmental risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in crop products from contaminated agriculture soils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Health)
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