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Special Issue "Landfill Leachate Treatment and Management"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Peter Randerson

Cardiff University, School of Biosciences, CF10 3TL Cardiff, Wales, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44 29 2087 4148
Interests: pollutant removal and nutrient recovery from effluents and waste water (biofiltration); eco-technology; root oxygenation; willow coppice; constructed wetland
Guest Editor
Dr. Andrzej Bialowiec

Faculty of Life Sciences and Technology, Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław, Poland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: organic waste; aerobic biostabilization of municipal waste; low-temperature pyrolysis; the RDF/SRF torrefaction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent industrial, commercial, and residential growth in many countries has been accompanied by rapid increases in municipal and industrial solid waste production. For technical, economic, and regulatory reasons, landfilling remains the most practical waste treatment solution, and yet it also appears the least rational approach to waste management due to emissions of biogas and leachate, which were often previously accepted as unavoidable. Landfill leachate is a complex cocktail of inorganic nutrients (especially nitrogen, NH3-N), volatile and dissolved organic compounds (characterized as both chemical and biological oxygen demand: COD/BOD), and heavy metals (mostly remaining deposited within the waste material). Strategies for landfill leachate management (collection, retention, recirculation and final treatment) are essential prior to discharging to surface or ground waters, to avoid severe impacts on the environment and potentially on human health. As such, hazards become widely recognized, and as progressively stricter regulatory requirements are imposed, the treatment of landfill leachate becomes a major environmental concern.

This Special Issue focuses on the state-of-the-art in landfill leachate treatment, including:

  • novel strategies for leachate management (quantitative and qualitative)
  • influence of landfill type and pre-treatment on leachate composition
  • influence of age of landfill on biodegradable and refractory organic matter composition (in relation to water infiltration and permeability)
  • evaluation of treatment processes, including physical (reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, ultrafiltration, sedimentation), chemical (precipitation, coagulation, oxidation) and biological (aerobic, and anaerobic, e.g., activated sludge) methods
  • phytoremediation technologies (irrigating energy crops; treatment in constructed wetlands; evapotranspiration in zero-effluent wetland systems)
  • improvements in conventional technology and innovative treatment alternatives
  • bioassay alternatives to chemical analysis for assessment of leachate toxicity (individual components and synergistic/antagonistic effects)
  • bioavailability and stability of toxic components (including those present at macro- micro- and nano-concentration levels)
  • cryptic impacts of leachate on living organisms (e.g., endocrine disruption; embryo development, mutagenic effects)
Dr. Peter Randerson
Dr. Andrzej Bialowiec
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • leachate treatment
  • leachate management
  • leachate composition
  • phytoremediation
  • leachate toxicity assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication Stomatal Conductance Measurement for Toxicity Assessment in Zero-Effluent Constructed Wetlands: Effects of Landfill Leachate on Hydrophytes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 468; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030468
Received: 24 January 2019 / Revised: 30 January 2019 / Accepted: 1 February 2019 / Published: 5 February 2019
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Abstract
In this research, we explore for the first time the use of leaf stomatal conductance (gs) for phytotoxicity assessment. Plants respond to stress by regulating transpiration. Transpiration can be correlated with stomatal conductance when the water vapor pressure gradient for transpiration [...] Read more.
In this research, we explore for the first time the use of leaf stomatal conductance (gs) for phytotoxicity assessment. Plants respond to stress by regulating transpiration. Transpiration can be correlated with stomatal conductance when the water vapor pressure gradient for transpiration is constant. Thus, our working hypothesis was that the gs measurement could be a useful indicator of the effect of toxic compounds on plants. This lab-scale study aimed to test the measurement of gs as a phytotoxicity indicator. Our model plants were two common hydrophytes used in zero-effluent constructed wetlands for treating landfill leachate. The toxic influence of two types of leachate from old landfills (L1, L2) on common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud.) and sweet flag (Acorus calamus L.) was tested. The gs measurements correlated well with plant response to treatments with six solutions (0 to 100%) of landfill leachate. Sweet flag showed higher tolerance to leachate solutions compared to common reed. The estimated lowest effective concentration (LOEC) causing the toxic effect values for these leachates were 3.94% of L1 and 5.76% of L2 in the case of reed, and 8.51% of L1 and 10.44% of L2 in the case of sweet flag. Leachate L1 was more toxic than L2. The leaf stomatal conductance measurement can be conducted in vivo and in the field. The proposed approach provides a useful parameter for indicating plant responses to the presence of toxic factors in the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landfill Leachate Treatment and Management)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Cotreatment of MSWI Fly Ash and Granulated Lead Smelting Slag Using a Geopolymer System
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010156
Received: 8 December 2018 / Revised: 24 December 2018 / Accepted: 1 January 2019 / Published: 8 January 2019
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Abstract
Municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MSWI FA) and granulated lead smelting slag (GLSS) are toxic industrial wastes. In the present study, granulated lead smelting slag (GLSS) was pretreated as a geopolymer precursor through the high-energy ball milling activation process, which could be [...] Read more.
Municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MSWI FA) and granulated lead smelting slag (GLSS) are toxic industrial wastes. In the present study, granulated lead smelting slag (GLSS) was pretreated as a geopolymer precursor through the high-energy ball milling activation process, which could be used as a geopolymeric solidification/stabilization (S/S) reagent for MSWI FA. The S/S process has been estimated through the physical properties and heavy metals leachability of the S/S matrices. The results show that the compressive strength of the geopolymer matrix reaches 15.32 MPa after curing for 28 days under the best parameters, and the physical properties meet the requirement of MU10 grade fly ash brick. In addition, the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test results show that arsenic and heavy metals are immobilized effectively in the geopolymer matrix, and their concentrations in the leachate are far below the US EPA TCLP limits. The hydration products of the geopolymer binder are characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared methods. The results show that the geopolymer gel and Friedel’s salt are the main hydration products. The S/S mechanism of the arsenic and heavy metals in the geopolymer matrix mainly involves physical encapsulation of the geopolymer gel, geopolymer adsorption and ion exchange of Friedel’s salt. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landfill Leachate Treatment and Management)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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