E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Housing and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Andrew Beer

Dean of Research and Innovation, University of South Australia Business School, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: regional determinants of well being; the role of housing as a public good; tenure; public policy in improving quality of life; housing theory
Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Emma Baker

School of Architecture and Built Environment, University of Adelaide, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: housing affordability and quality; mental and physical health; causal analysis; healthy cities; inequality
Guest Editor
Dr. Lyrian Daniel

School of Architecture and Built Environment, University of Adelaide, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: architecture, building innovation systsems; thermal comfort; health outcomes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

You are invited to contribute to a Special Issue on housing and health in the 21st Century. This Special Issue seeks to look forward and understand emerging trends as societies and economies continue to transform, and as the world’s population becomes ever more urbanised. We welcome papers that examine the ways in which risks—including physical and psychosocial environmental harms—affect individuals and households. The Special Issue will consider issues such as overcrowding, the appropriateness of the current dwelling stock for achieving our health goals, the role of neighbourhoods and walkability in contributing to health, the ways in which housing may affect the long-term wellbeing of those with illnesses or disabilities, and new urban planning paradigms and their potential impacts.

The Special Issue welcomes contributions from both quantitative and qualitative scholars and is especaily interested in contributions that seek to make major conceptual or theoretical advances. Papers are not limtied to developed or developing economies and can consider supra-national issues, such as the development of international approaches, e.g., the World Health Organisation, to questions of housing and health. 

Prof. Andrew Beer
Assoc. Prof. Emma Baker
Dr. Lyrian Daniel
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Housing and physical health
  • Housing and mental health
  • Disability
  • Neighbourhood effects
  • Trends in housing and health
  • Urbanisation
  • Developed and developing economies

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Gender Differences in Geriatric Depressive Symptoms in Rural China: The Role of Physical Housing Environments and Living Arrangements
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 774; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050774
Received: 15 December 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2019 / Accepted: 20 February 2019 / Published: 4 March 2019
PDF Full-text (315 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Physical housing environment and living arrangements are significant determinants of health, particularly in developing countries, although results are mixed. We conducted this study to examine the gender differences in geriatric depressive symptoms in rural China, and further explored the influence of housing environments [...] Read more.
Physical housing environment and living arrangements are significant determinants of health, particularly in developing countries, although results are mixed. We conducted this study to examine the gender differences in geriatric depressive symptoms in rural China, and further explored the influence of housing environments and living arrangements on depressive symptoms. The data used for this study were from the third wave of the nationally representative China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) survey in 2015; a total of 2056 females and 2529 males were included in this study. According to the analysis findings, 46.15% of the respondents had depressive symptoms based on the CES-D, with a statistically significant gender difference of 54.32% in females and 39.50% in males. Logistic Regression findings identified that with regard to the items of physical housing environments, toilets without seats (OR = 1.349) and the unavailability of bathing facilities (OR = 1.469) were statistically associated with depressive symptoms among male participants, whereas for female participants the use of polluting fuels (OR = 1.248) and living arrangements (i.e., living with children, OR = 1.430) was statistically associated with depressive symptoms. Statistically significant gender differences were found for having shower or bath facilities and our findings underscored that physical housing environments and living arrangements were associated with depressive symptoms for both genders. Moreover, the study revealed that a slight gender difference exists in terms of geriatric depression in rural China. Females are more likely to become depressed than their male counterparts with the same characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Housing and Health)
Open AccessArticle
Causes of Delays during Housing Adaptation for Healthy Aging in the UK
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(2), 192; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16020192
Received: 12 October 2018 / Revised: 14 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 11 January 2019
PDF Full-text (672 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Housing adaptation is a rehabilitation intervention that removes environmental barriers to help older people accommodate changing needs and age in place. In the UK, funding application for home adaptations to local authorities is subject to several procedural steps, including referral, allocation, assessment, funding [...] Read more.
Housing adaptation is a rehabilitation intervention that removes environmental barriers to help older people accommodate changing needs and age in place. In the UK, funding application for home adaptations to local authorities is subject to several procedural steps, including referral, allocation, assessment, funding and installation. The five stages need to complete in a sequential manner, often cause long delays. This study aims to investigate the timelines across these key stages of the adaptation process and examine the main causes of delays in current practice. A mixed-methods research strategy was employed. A questionnaire survey was first undertaken with all 378 local authorities in England, Scotland and Wales; it was followed by 5 semi-structured interviews and 1 focus group meeting with selected service providers, and 2 case studies of service users. The results showed that the average length of time taken to complete the whole process is relatively long, with the longest waiting time being observed at the funding decision stage. Delays were found in each of the key stages. Main causes of delay include insufficient resources, lack of joint work, legal requirements, shortage of competent contractors and the client’s decisions. These issues need to be addressed in order to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of future housing adaptation practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Housing and Health)
Figures

Figure 1

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top