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Special Issue "Environmental Influences on Food Behaviour"

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Catherine Paquet

Centre for Population Health Research, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide SA 5001, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: food behaviour; food environment; social environment; food marketing; individual susceptibility; chronic disease epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organising a Special Issue on the impact of the environment on food behaviour in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph. 

The ubiquitous presence of food cues in our modern environment is believed to contribute to the rising trends in overconsumption and associated obesity observed over the last few decades. This has led to the rapid development of literature aiming to assess how the food or nutrition environment (the places where we purchase or consume food) promote healthy or unhealthy eating. Despite these developments, much remains to be done to better measure our food environments, how they influence specific purchasing and eating patterns across the life course, and who is more likely to be influenced by environmental food cues. From a methodological perspective, more experimental and prospective evidence for these relationships are needed to better inform the development of future interventions and policies.

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to the impacts of environmental food cue exposure on food behaviour. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Dr. Catherine Paquet
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

1. If you are a potential author of this Special Issue; or
2. If you are interested in this Special Issue, but cannot submit a paper at this time;
We encourage you to join our reviewer database at: https://susy.mdpi.com/volunteer_reviewer/step/1
When you help to review other manuscripts in this Special Issue, you will be offered a voucher of 50–100 CHF reduction from the APC for each valid review, which can be used immediately for your current submission, or for your future submissions to any MDPI journal.

Keywords

  • Neighbourhood
  • Food Environment
  • Nutrition environment
  • Food outlets
  • Dietary behaviour
  • Nutrition
  • Food consumption
  • Foodscape
  • Restaurants
  • Food stores
  • Food cues

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Local Retail Food Environment and Consumption of Fruit and Vegetable among Adults in Hong Kong
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2247; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102247
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 9 October 2018 / Accepted: 11 October 2018 / Published: 14 October 2018
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Abstract
Outside of western countries, the study of the local food environment and evidence for its association with dietary behavior is limited. The aim of this paper was to examine the association between the local retail food environment and consumption of fruit and vegetables
[...] Read more.
Outside of western countries, the study of the local food environment and evidence for its association with dietary behavior is limited. The aim of this paper was to examine the association between the local retail food environment and consumption of fruit and vegetables (FV) among adults in Hong Kong. Local retail food environment was measured by density of different types of retail food outlets (grocery stores, convenience stores, and fast food restaurants) within a 1000 m Euclidean buffer around individual’s homes using a geographic information system (GIS). The Retail Food Environment Index (RFEI) was calculated based on the relative density of fast-food restaurants and convenience stores to grocery stores. Logistic regressions were performed to examine associations using cross-sectional data of 1977 adults (18 years or older). Overall, people living in an area with the highest RFEI (Q4, >5.76) had significantly greater odds of infrequent FV consumption (<7 days/week) after covariates adjustment (infrequent fruit consumption: OR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.04–1.78; infrequent vegetable consumption: OR = 1.72, 95% CI 1.11–2.68) in comparison to the lowest RFEI (Q1, <2.25). Highest density of fast food restaurants (Q4, >53) was also significantly associated with greater odds of infrequent fruit consumption (<7 days/week) (unadjusted model: OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.04–1.73), relative to lowest density of fast food restaurants (Q1, <13). No significant association of density of grocery stores or convenience stores was observed with infrequent FV consumption regardless of the covariates included in the model. Our results suggest that the ratio of fast-food restaurants and convenience stores to grocery stores near people’s home is an important environmental factor in meeting fruit and vegetable consumption guidelines. “Food swamps” (areas with an abundance of unhealthy foods) rather than “food deserts” (areas where there is limited access to healthy foods) seems to be more of a problem in Hong Kong’s urban areas. We advanced international literature by providing evidence in a non-western setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Influences on Food Behaviour)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Customer Purchase Intentions and Choice in Food Retail Environments: A Scoping Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2493; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112493
Received: 7 August 2018 / Revised: 25 October 2018 / Accepted: 30 October 2018 / Published: 8 November 2018
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Abstract
Food purchasing and consumption behaviors have implications for nutrition and obesity. Food retail environments, in particular, shape customer food choices and energy intake. The marketing literature offers insights about how public health practitioners can work within food retail environments to encourage healthy food
[...] Read more.
Food purchasing and consumption behaviors have implications for nutrition and obesity. Food retail environments, in particular, shape customer food choices and energy intake. The marketing literature offers insights about how public health practitioners can work within food retail environments to encourage healthy food choices. We reviewed experimental studies in the marketing literature to examine factors influencing customer purchase intentions and choice for food products in retail stores. Database searches were conducted in February 2016 for original, empirical articles published in English from 2000–2015 in marketing journals. Each research article included at least one experimental design study conducted in a real or simulated retail environment with purchase intentions or choice of food products as an outcome variable. Backward and forward reference searches were conducted for articles meeting inclusion criteria. Narrative synthesis methods were used to thematically group and summarize the findings of forty-one articles that met inclusion criteria into three categories: shelf display and product factors, pricing and price promotion factors, and in-store and customer decision-making factors. This research contributes to the literature by providing specific and actionable approaches that can increase/decrease customer purchase intentions and choice for food products in retail environments. Translating marketing strategies into public health applications can provide recommendations for future intervention research and policy related to customer food purchasing behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Influences on Food Behaviour)
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