Topical Collection "Emerging Topics in Environmental Justice"

Editors

Dr. Jayajit Chakraborty
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, USA
Interests: environmental justice; environmental health; environmental hazards/disasters; social vulnerability; racial/ethnic disparities; GIScience; spatial analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sara E. Grineski
Website
Guest Editor
Dr. Timothy W. Collins
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, University of Utah, 260 S. Campus Dr., Rm. 4625, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
Interests: human-environment interactions; vulnerability; hazards, risks, and disasters; environmental justice; health disparities; climate change; water; wildfire; air pollution
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental Justice (EJ) research seeks to document and address the adverse and disproportionate environmental health and risk burdens associated with multiple dimensions of social inequality. Although its initial focus was on anthropogenic pollution, the scope of EJ research has expanded to encompass many other issues such as natural disasters, resource depletion, energy use, consumption patterns, food systems, climate change, and government policies that adversely affect the environment and health of particular social groups. Dimensions of social inequality examined have expanded beyond race and socioeconomic status to include age, ethnicity, disability, immigration status, indigenous identity, gender, and religion, as well as intersections between several dimensions of inequality. In a context of intensifying social inequalities, there is a growing need to further strengthen the EJ framework and continue diversifying its themes through cutting-edge research on emerging forms of environmental and health injustices.

This Topic Collection provides a forum for conceptual, methodological, and empirical scholarship on EJ. We welcome original case studies, literature reviews, critical evaluations of methodologies, and discussions of future research or data needs that focus on any aspect of EJ analysis, activism, and/or policy. Paper topics may include, but are not limited to, the following issues: anthropogenic hazards (e.g., air pollution); natural disasters (e.g., flooding); environmental health outcomes (e.g., cancer, respiratory illnesses); environmental amenities (e.g., parks, greenspace); environmental policies; climate change; food and agriculture; mining and resource extraction; water pollution and scarcity; and transportation.

Dr. Jayajit Chakraborty
Dr. Sara E. Grineski
Dr. Timothy W. Collins
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

2021

Open AccessArticle
Air Quality and Environmental Injustice in India: Connecting Particulate Pollution to Social Disadvantages
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 304; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010304 - 04 Jan 2021
Abstract
While air pollution levels in India are amongst the highest in the world, the link between exposure to air pollution and social disadvantages has not been systematically examined. Using a distributive environmental justice framework, this study connects fine particulate matter (PM2.5) [...] Read more.
While air pollution levels in India are amongst the highest in the world, the link between exposure to air pollution and social disadvantages has not been systematically examined. Using a distributive environmental justice framework, this study connects fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration data derived from satellite observations, a global chemical transport model, and ground-based measurements to district level socio-demographic information from the 2011 Census of India. The research objectives are to determine if annual average PM2.5 concentrations (2010) and recent increases in average PM2.5 concentrations (2010–2016) are unequally distributed with respect to socially disadvantaged population and household groups, after controlling for relevant contextual factors and spatial clustering. Overall, more than 85% of people and households in India reside in districts where international air quality standards for PM2.5 are exceeded. Although PM2.5 concentration levels are significantly higher in more urbanized districts located predominantly in northern India, recent increases have occurred in less urbanized areas located mainly in southern and central India. Multivariable statistical analysis indicated: (1) higher PM2.5 concentration in districts with higher percentages of Scheduled Castes (SCs), young children, and households in poor condition residence and without toilets; and (2) higher PM2.5 increases in less urbanized districts with higher percentages of SCs, females, children, people with disabilities, and households with no toilets. These findings thus highlight the need to consider the role of air pollution in exacerbating the consequences of social disadvantages in India. Full article
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