Special Issue "Current Trends in Mental Health Research in Asia Pacific Region"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Edimansyah Abdin E-Mail
Institute of Mental Health, Singapore Research Division, Singapore
Interests: psychiatric epidemiology; trends and projection; health services research; disability and functioning; measurement and psychometric testing; health psychology; quality of life; wellbeing; psychosocial risk factors; effectiveness of treatment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Global Burden of Disease Study, which measured disease burden, estimated that mental and behavioural disorders accounted for 22.7% of all years lived with disability (YLD), which was an increase of 37% from 1990 to 2010 (Vos et al., 2012). Asia Pacific is a region characterised by rapid changes in economic and technological development, population growth, migration, and demographics. Across this region, mental illness causes a significant health and socioeconomic burden, which on average accounts for more than 20% of the total YLDs and 9.3% of the DALYs of the economy (Ng, 2018). While the impact of mental illness in this region is growing, very few papers in the literature to date have updated the current trends of research on mental health in this region. Hence, this Special Issue will provide up to date current research findings in the area of mental health. We invite authors to submit manuscripts related to all aspects of mental health research that have been conducted recently in the Asia Pacific region.

Dr. Edimansyah Abdin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psychiatry epidemiology
  • mental health
  • health services research
  • Asian

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
How Do Coworkers Aid in Coping with Emotional Exhaustion? An Experience Sampling Method Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2919; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162919 - 14 Aug 2019
Abstract
The present study emphasizes the indirect influences of coworker helping behavior on emotional exhaustion through psychological availability and the moderating role of perceived task demands on a daily basis. Using a two-wave experience sampling method with data collected via mobile phones, we collected [...] Read more.
The present study emphasizes the indirect influences of coworker helping behavior on emotional exhaustion through psychological availability and the moderating role of perceived task demands on a daily basis. Using a two-wave experience sampling method with data collected via mobile phones, we collected 345 matched data from 69 samples over five consecutive days in mainland China. We developed a moderated mediation model to test our conceptual model, with the following significant results: (1) Daily coworker helping behavior decreased employee emotional exhaustion; (2) daily psychological availability mediated the influence of coworker helping behavior on employee emotional exhaustion; (3) through psychological availability, perceived task demands moderated the indirect influence of daily coworker helping behavior on emotional exhaustion. The indirect influence of daily coworker helping behavior only emerged with a low perception of job demands. This research explores the mechanism and boundary conditions of the relationship between daily coworker helping behavior and employee emotional exhaustion with the job demands-resources model framework. In practice, leaders should adopt beneficial interventions to enhance team cohesion, to facilitate team members’ helping behavior, and to manage task demands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Mental Health Research in Asia Pacific Region)
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Open AccessArticle
Suicide Trends over Time by Occupation in Korea and Their Relationship to Economic Downturns
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 2007; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16112007 - 05 Jun 2019
Abstract
We analyzed suicide mortality by occupation using administrative data from 1993 to 2016. Methods: National death records from 1993 to 2016 of the Korea National Statistical Office (KNSO) were used. Suicidal death was taken from Korean Classification of Disease codes as intentional self-harm [...] Read more.
We analyzed suicide mortality by occupation using administrative data from 1993 to 2016. Methods: National death records from 1993 to 2016 of the Korea National Statistical Office (KNSO) were used. Suicidal death was taken from Korean Classification of Disease codes as intentional self-harm (X60–X84) and sequelae of intentional self-harm (Y870). Occupational groups were categorized into “Manager,” “Officer,” ”Service-Trade,” “Agricultural-Fishery-Forestry” (AFF), “Skilled Manual,” and “Unskilled Manual.” Direct standardized mortality (DSM) and standardized mortality ratio (SMR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated. Overall, suicide rates increased during economic downturns, especially among lower socio-economic occupation classes. Both DSM and SMR were highest in AFF, followed by Unskilled Manual, Service-Trade, Officer, Skilled Manual, and Manager categories among men, whereas women showed the highest DSM and SMR in AFF, followed by Service-Trade, Officer, Unskilled Manual, Manager, and Skilled Manual categories. The age-stratified analysis showed that age groups with increasing trends in suicide differed according to occupation and gender. In certain occupational groups, the time-point prevalence fluctuated with socio-economic background in suicidal mortality and differed by age and gender. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Mental Health Research in Asia Pacific Region)
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