Special Issue "Clincial Psychology and Psychotherapy"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Sylke Andreas
E-Mail Website
Chief Guest Editor
Institute of Psychology, Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt, Universitätsstraße 65-67, 9020 Klagenfurt am Wörthersee, Austria
Interests: aging; psychotherapy; elderly; mentalization; mental health
Dr. Tobias Nolte
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UCL and Anne Freud National Centre for Children and Families,London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
Interests: attachment; personality disorders; mentalizing; psychotherapy research; epistemic trust
Prof. Dr. Thomas Probst
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department for Psychotherapy and Biopsychosocial Health, Danube University Krems, Krems an der Donau 3500, Austria
Interests: psychotherapy; psychosomatics; digital health
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In a rapidly changing world characterised by digitalisation, globalisation and the pandemic crisis, mental health is of central importance. Depression and anxiety disorders are one of the leading causes of disability in the world. There is no question that there are effective and efficient psychotherapy methods for patients with mental disorders, and numerous meta-analytical findings support this. Psychotherapy research focuses intensively on the factors that have an impact in psychotherapy. Norcorss and Lambert (2011) was able to show that the therapeutic relationship, specific techniques like the treatment method, the individual therapist, and patient characteristics contribute significantly to the outcome in psychotherapy. However, a large amount of variance remains unexplained. This unexplained variance could, for example, be explained by processes between sessions or matching patients to treatments and therapists. In this context, the use of adjuvant, Internet-based methods in psychotherapy certainly plays an important role, especially in the times of Covid-19.

The present Special Issue addresses this topic by inviting scholars to share findings, perspectives and approaches, with the aim of analysing common or specific factors of change in different kinds of psychotherapy, to analyse the use of Internet-based methods to support the process and outcome in psychotherapy, to analyse the therapist and patient factors by explaining variance in the outcome, to analyse the implementation of therapeutic methods, and to further the development and evaluation of services.

Prof. Sylke Andreas
Prof. Dr. Thomas Probst
Dr. Tobias Nolte
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • common factors
  • specific factors
  • mechanism of change
  • service development
  • evaluation
  • implementation
  • Covid-19
  • predictors of change

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
How the COVID-19 Pandemic Changes the Subjective Perception of Meaning Related to Different Areas of Life in Austrian Psychotherapists and Patients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8600; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228600 - 19 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1065
Abstract
We assessed psychotherapists’ and patients’ ratings of their subjective perception of meaning related to different areas of life before the COVID-19 pandemic as compared to the time during the COVID-19 pandemic. In a quantitative cross-sectional study, Austrian psychotherapists (N = 222) were [...] Read more.
We assessed psychotherapists’ and patients’ ratings of their subjective perception of meaning related to different areas of life before the COVID-19 pandemic as compared to the time during the COVID-19 pandemic. In a quantitative cross-sectional study, Austrian psychotherapists (N = 222) were recruited by e-mail, who in turn recruited their patients (N = 139). Therapists and patients were asked to rate the meaning of different areas of life before as well as during the COVID-19 crisis. The psychotherapists showed an overall higher rating of the importance of areas of life compared to their patients (p < 0.001). The rating of the importance of the domains of living was differently affected by the COVID-19 situation (p < 0.001). While the meaning of physical and mental health during COVID-19 was rated higher than before, the opposite was observed for work (p < 0.001). No differences were found for relationships and friends, as well as for hobbies. As no interactions between perspective (therapists vs. patients), area of life, and time point (before vs. during COVID-19) were observed, it can be concluded that the COVID-19 situation changed the subjective attribution of meaning concerning different aspects of life similarly in therapists as well as patients. While mental and physical health gained subjective importance, the opposite was observed for work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clincial Psychology and Psychotherapy)
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Article
Psychotherapy via the Internet: What Programs Do Psychotherapists Use, How Well-Informed Do They Feel, and What Are Their Wishes for Continuous Education?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8182; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218182 - 05 Nov 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 986
Abstract
The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has caused changes in the provision of psychotherapy around the world. The common format of delivering in-person psychotherapy is replaced by psychotherapy via the Internet to a great extent. This study examined how well Austrian psychotherapists feel [...] Read more.
The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has caused changes in the provision of psychotherapy around the world. The common format of delivering in-person psychotherapy is replaced by psychotherapy via the Internet to a great extent. This study examined how well Austrian psychotherapists feel informed about the use of the Internet in psychotherapy, where additional information needs exist, and which software is used. A link to an online survey was sent to all psychotherapists providing a valid email address in the official list of licensed psychotherapists at the start of the COVID-19 lockdown in Austria. A total of 1547 people took part in the survey. The results show that psychotherapy via the Internet was primarily offered via Skype and Zoom during the COVID-19 pandemic and that the majority of the therapists felt well-informed about psychotherapy via the Internet; however, several therapists stated that they wish to have further information on data protection and security. Overall, the study shows that Austrian psychotherapists coped well with the rapid change from the provision of psychotherapy through personal contact to psychotherapy via the Internet. Security and data protection aspects of therapy via the Internet should be addressed in training and further education of psychotherapists. As this study was conducted online, it might have caused some respondent bias towards a higher participation of psychotherapists with higher preference for new technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clincial Psychology and Psychotherapy)
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Article
Psychotherapy by Telephone or Internet in Austria and Germany Which CBT Psychotherapists Rate It more Comparable to Face-to-Face Psychotherapy in Personal Contact and Have more Positive Actual Experiences Compared to Previous Expectations?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7756; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217756 - 23 Oct 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1838
Abstract
Objectives: COVID-19 has led to changes in the provision in mental health services. The current study investigated influencing factors on: (i) the comparability of psychotherapy via internet/telephone with psychotherapy in face-to-face contact as well as (ii) the actual experience with psychotherapy via [...] Read more.
Objectives: COVID-19 has led to changes in the provision in mental health services. The current study investigated influencing factors on: (i) the comparability of psychotherapy via internet/telephone with psychotherapy in face-to-face contact as well as (ii) the actual experience with psychotherapy via internet/telephone compared to respective prior expectations in CBT therapists. Methods: A quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted in the form of an online survey. The research samples, registered cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) psychotherapists in Austria and Germany, were contacted by e-mail. Results: One hundred and ninety CBT therapists were analyzed in this study. The total number of patients treated via telephone/internet is a decisive factor for the subjective evaluation of the comparability of psychotherapy via telephone/internet and psychotherapy in personal contact. This factor also influences the extent (positive/negative) of the assessment of the actual experience with psychotherapy via internet/telephone compared to previous expectations. Neither age nor gender were associated with comparability of psychotherapy via internet/telephone with psychotherapy in face-to-face contact or the actual experience with psychotherapy via internet/telephone compared to respective prior expectations. Conclusions: Implications of the results are that attitudes towards remote psychotherapy might be increased in CBT therapists when they treat more patients remotely and experiences with remote psychotherapies should be included in psychotherapy training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clincial Psychology and Psychotherapy)
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