Special Issue "Child and Adolescent Health in a Life-Course Perspective"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Julia Dratva
Website
Guest Editor
University of Basel, Winterthur, Switzerland
Interests: child and adolescent health; child mental health; child and adolescent health monitoring; early life factors of health (including early nutrition, tobacco exposure); health literacy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on Child and Adolescent Health in a Life-Course Perspective in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

The relevance of a life-course perspective on health and disease has become widely accepted in research and has recently found its way into policy. The approach is supported by both sociological and biomedical theories and evidence. Common to both sociological and biomedical theories is the exposure to environmental factors at the time of conception, in utero or in early life. The environment encompasses sociocultural, economic, and political, as well as the physical environment people are exposed to. The potential of a life-course perspective to health and disease lies in the potential of early prevention and health promotion, underlining the high impact it can have for public health, as well as in an increased understanding of pathways to disease and of intra- and transgenerational factors of health, providing a basis for personalized as well as public health benefit.

This Special Issue is open to any research addressing a life-course perspective to child and adolescent public health, both from a sociological as well as biomedical point of view or a combination of both and other theoretical concepts supporting the life-course perspective.

The following key words are only a selection of possible topics.

Prof. Dr. Julia Dratva
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Early life (risk) factors
  • Life course
  • Child and adolescent health
  • Public health
  • Intergenerational
  • Transgenerational
  • Maternal factors
  • Paternal factors
  • Vulnerability
  • Resilience
  • Environment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Association between Childhood Suicidal Ideation and Geriatric Depression in Japan: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2257; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072257 (registering DOI) - 27 Mar 2020
Abstract
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are assumed to increase the risk of depression in late life via development of poor mental health conditions; however, the association between mental distress in childhood and geriatric depression has not been directly examined. This study examined the association [...] Read more.
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are assumed to increase the risk of depression in late life via development of poor mental health conditions; however, the association between mental distress in childhood and geriatric depression has not been directly examined. This study examined the association between childhood suicidal ideation and geriatric depression, using population-based, cross-sectional survey data from 1140 community-dwelling, functionally independent older adults in Wakuya City, Japan. We assessed childhood suicidal ideation by asking the participants whether they had seriously considered attempting suicide before the age of 18, together with geriatric depression, using the Japanese version of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. Poisson regression was applied to adjust for potential confounders and mediators. In total, 6.1% of the participants reported childhood suicidal ideation. After adjustment for sex, age, personality attributes and ACEs, childhood suicidal ideation was positively associated with geriatric depression prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.40, 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI): 1.04–1.88). The increased PR of geriatric depression remained significant, even after further adjustment for adulthood socio-economic status, recent life stressors and current health status (PR: 1.38, 95%CI: 1.02–1.88). Further prospective studies are warranted, but efforts to deliver mental health services to children with suicidal ideation potentially diminish the highly prevalent geriatric depression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Health in a Life-Course Perspective)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Linear Growth in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3677; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193677 - 30 Sep 2019
Abstract
Ensuring normal linear growth is one of the major therapeutic aims in the management of type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in children and adolescents. Many studies in the literature have shown that pediatric patients with T1DM frequently present some abnormalities in their growth [...] Read more.
Ensuring normal linear growth is one of the major therapeutic aims in the management of type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in children and adolescents. Many studies in the literature have shown that pediatric patients with T1DM frequently present some abnormalities in their growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis compared to their healthy peers. Data on the growth of T1DM children and adolescents are still discordant: Some studies have reported that T1DM populations, especially those whose diabetes began in early childhood, are taller than healthy pediatric populations at diagnosis, while other studies have not found any difference. Moreover, many reports have highlighted a growth impairment in T1DM patients of prepubertal and pubertal age, and this impairment seems to be influenced by suboptimal glycemic control and disease duration. However, the most recent data showed that children treated with modern intensive insulin therapies reach a normal final adult height. This narrative review aims to provide current knowledge regarding linear growth in children and adolescents with T1DM. Currently, the choice of the most appropriate therapeutic regimen to achieve a good insulin level and the best metabolic control for each patient, together with the regular measurement of growth parameters, remains the most important available tool for a pediatric diabetologist. Nevertheless, since new technologies are the therapy of choice in young children, especially those of pre-school age, it would be of great interest to evaluate their effects on the growth pattern of children with T1DM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Health in a Life-Course Perspective)
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