Special Issue "Aquatic Experience in Physical Literacy: From Specific to Extensive Meanings of Aquatics for Life"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Raffaele Scurati
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Interests: motor learning; motor control and biomechanics in swimming; sensory-perception and coordination; teaching methods and didactics in physical education and sport
Dr. Matteo Cortesi
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department for Life Quality Studies, Rimini, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Interests: swimming biomechanics; performance in water exercise; energetics of human locomotion in water; key determinants of aquatic sports activities; aquatic human locomotion; training and testing in aquatic activities
Prof. Dr. Pedro Morouço
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Dr. Nuno Batalha
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
CHRC–UE - Comprehensive Health Research Center, Departamento de Desporto e Saúde, Escola de Ciência e Tecnologia, Universidade de Évora, Évora, Portugal.
Interests: biomechanical and physiological determinant factors of sports performance, especially in swimming; teaching and training in aquatic sports.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical literacy embodies psychomotor, cognitive, motivational, and social aspects of the movement. Physically literate individuals better capitalize on the dynamic interactions of the aforementioned domains and can “read” the environment well, better dealing with the requirements of life. Physical literacy is therefore considered as a precondition to maintain appropriate levels of physical activity throughout life and to consequently contrast sedentary lifestyle, promote psychophysical wellbeing, and preserve health and quality of life.

In this holistic vision, the aquatic environment is a complementary condition allowing to experience specific and distinguishing movement proficiencies, differently from the usual terrestrial behaviors. It enriches the vocabulary of competencies and results in improving the ability to respond to embodied needs.

With this in mind, this Special Issue focuses on the multifactorial complexity of aquatic activity. A specific physical literacy in the aquatic environment has to be promoted to go beyond the recent literature on swimming and aquatics mostly addressed to biomechanics, medicine, and training.

Papers addressing didactics on fundamental aquatic skills, learn-to-swim, and aquatics in general are invited for this Special Issue. We welcome manuscripts specifically focusing on education, pedagogy, methodology, and conduction of aquatic experiences from infancy to old age towards the embodiment of psychomotor, cognitive, motivational, and social competencies for life by aquatics.

Dr. Raffaele Scurati
Dr. Matteo Cortesi
Dr. Pedro Morouço
Dr. Nuno Batalha
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical literacy
  • swimming
  • aquatic skills
  • water exercise
  • motor learning
  • physical education
  • teaching methods
  • embodiment
  • physical activity
  • quality of life

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Aquatic Physical Literacy: The Effectiveness of Applied Pedagogy on Parents’ and Children’s Perceptions of Aquatic Motor Competence
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10847; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010847 - 15 Oct 2021
Viewed by 188
Abstract
The goal of swimming school during early school age is to promote physical literacy. According to linear or non-linear pedagogy, a linear or non-linear approach teaching style can be used. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a different teaching methodology, [...] Read more.
The goal of swimming school during early school age is to promote physical literacy. According to linear or non-linear pedagogy, a linear or non-linear approach teaching style can be used. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a different teaching methodology, as in using a teacher-centered approach (linear pedagogy), or a student-centered approach (non-linear pedagogy), could differently influence the perceptions of aquatic activity of children and parents. Parents of 100 children (53 females and 47 males, age 5.9 ± 0.3 years old) participating in the study were previously interviewed to ascertain their expectations regarding the swimming course. Participants were in a medium-high social context. Subsequently, considering the data of the incoming aquatic motor competence’s tests, children were divided into a linear (LI) and non-linear (NL) pedagogy group. A total of 4 instructors were enrolled. Upon completing the swimming course, the aquatic motor competence’s test was repeated, a pictorial scale of perceived motor competence was administered, and a questionnaire regarding the course was proposed to children’s parents. Physical development and learn to swim resulted two of the most important reasons leading parents to choose swimming courses. LI achieved greater progress than the NL in actual motor competence (A.M.C.), while NL perceived a higher aquatic motor competence (P.M.C.) in 7 out of 10 items of the pictorial scale. Parents of children in LI, gave greater importance to the teacher’s role, while NL’s parents pointed the acquisition of children’s abilities as pivotal. In conclusion, NL approach was more appreciated by children, while LI method was more rewarding for parents because initial expectations were satisfied. Full article
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Article
Outsourcing Swimming Education—Experiences and Challenges
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010006 - 22 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1149
Abstract
In Norway, swimming and lifesaving education (swimming education) is an obligatory part of physical education, with explicit learning aims after grade four. After recent reports of Norwegian pupils achieving low scores in swimming abilities, the Government has outlined strategies for improving swimming education. [...] Read more.
In Norway, swimming and lifesaving education (swimming education) is an obligatory part of physical education, with explicit learning aims after grade four. After recent reports of Norwegian pupils achieving low scores in swimming abilities, the Government has outlined strategies for improving swimming education. There is a notable trend toward using external providers in delivering swimming education. This article examines the outsourcing of swimming education in Norwegian primary schools. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with school leaders, physical education teachers and swimming instructors involved in outsourcing arrangements. The outsourcing was organized through private providers, municipalities, or local swimming clubs. Data were analyzed thematically and separated into highlighted areas of outsourcing practices. The results showed that outsourcing may be a solution for schools that lack staff with swimming experience and knowledge. It also indicates that teacher courses, professional development through collaboration, and strategies for measuring quality would improve swimming education. Full article
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Article
Design and Validation of the Scale to Measure Aquatic Competence in Children (SMACC)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6188; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176188 - 26 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1258
Abstract
(1) Background: The aim of this study was to design and analyze the validity of the SMACC (Scale to Measure Aquatic Competence in Children) to evaluate aquatic competence in three- to six-year-old children. In addition, the relation between real competence obtained with the [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The aim of this study was to design and analyze the validity of the SMACC (Scale to Measure Aquatic Competence in Children) to evaluate aquatic competence in three- to six-year-old children. In addition, the relation between real competence obtained with the SMACC and perceived aquatic competence was verified as well as its differences according to sex and age. (2) Methods: Content validation was performed through the consensus of nine experts using the Delphi technique, and comprehension validity was determined through a pilot study on a sample of 122 children. An exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis was performed with two independent samples of 384 and 444 school children between three and six years old, respectively. (3) Results: After the pertinent adjustments, the final questionnaire comprised 17 items, which showed a good fit for both comprehension and content validity. The results of the exploratory and confirmatory analyses support the use of three dimensions in aquatic competence: motor, socio-affective, and cognitive. The correlations support construct validity showing a positive relation with perceived aquatic competence. (4) Conclusions: These promising validity data are discussed from a global and integrative perspective in relation to the improvement of children’s development in the aquatic environment during the early stages of their lives. Full article
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Article
Perceived and Real Aquatic Competence in Children from 6 to 10 Years Old
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6101; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176101 - 21 Aug 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1133
Abstract
This study aimed to analyze the relationship between perceived aquatic competence (PAC) and real aquatic competence (RAC) in 6 to 10 year old children in skills identified as relevant for surviving an aquatic accident. The study sample consisted of 105 children (8.2 + [...] Read more.
This study aimed to analyze the relationship between perceived aquatic competence (PAC) and real aquatic competence (RAC) in 6 to 10 year old children in skills identified as relevant for surviving an aquatic accident. The study sample consisted of 105 children (8.2 + 1.3 years old). Two age groups were examined separately [G1, 6 to 7 years (n = 53); G2, 8 to 10 years (n = 52)]. Children’s aquatic competence was evaluated twice for skills linked to the risk of drowning: Firstly, using a common swimsuit (simple condition) and secondly wearing a t-shirt (complex condition). The PAC was assessed by questionnaire interview. Pearson correlation coefficients, pairwise, and independent t-test comparisons were performed with a significance level of 5%. Similar levels of PAC were found among both age groups for all measured skills, excepted for breath control during swimming (p < 0.05). However, PAC differs significantly (p < 0.001) from RAC (in simple and complex conditions) only in G1. Correlations between PAC and RAC were modest for all measured skills in both age-groups. Significant differences were found between RAC in simple and complex conditions in both groups (p < 0.01). Age contributes to a higher perceived aquatic competence in skills related to the risk of drowning. Full article
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