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Recent Advances in Aedes Aegypti Control

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Disease Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 9752

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
Interests: urban pest management; urban mosquito control

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
Interests: urban pest management; urban mosquito control

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory, University of Florida, 200 9th St SE, Vero Beach, FL 32962, USA
Interests: mosquito insecticide resistance; public health entomology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We have been invited to be Guest Editors for a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. This issue will concentrate on new advances in the control of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Aedes aegypti are the main vectors of Zika, Dengue, and Chikungunya viruses. They are domestic mosquitoes that develop in urban areas in proximity to humans and human habitation. This vector is a daytime biter, develops in small bodies of water, usually flies short distances (<1/4 mile), and has developed significant levels of insecticide resistance; these traits make this mosquito species very difficult to control. In this issue, we will present recent advances in the management of this vector that has a tremendous impact throughout the world.

Prof. Dr. Philip G. Koehler
Dr. Roberto Pereira
Dr. Casey Parker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • insecticides
  • monitoring
  • resistance
  • mosquito
  • yellow fever mosquito

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 926 KiB  
Article
A Mosquito Workshop and Community Intervention: A Pilot Education Campaign to Identify Risk Factors Associated with Container Mosquitoes in San Pedro Sula, Honduras
by Casey Parker, Felicita Garcia, Oscar Menocal, Dunia Jeer and Barry Alto
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(13), 2399; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132399 - 6 Jul 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3813
Abstract
Dengue poses a significant public health threat and results in ~96 million clinical cases every year. Central America is a region burdened by neglected tropical diseases, including dengue. The primary vectors of dengue, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, are widely distributed in [...] Read more.
Dengue poses a significant public health threat and results in ~96 million clinical cases every year. Central America is a region burdened by neglected tropical diseases, including dengue. The primary vectors of dengue, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, are widely distributed in Honduras. Additionally, sustained and consistent mosquito control is lacking in the country. Successful control of container mosquitoes relies heavily on participation from community leaders, stakeholders, and the community itself. We conducted a pilot study in San Pedro Sula, Honduras where community leaders and stakeholders were trained on mosquito biology and control and were able to apply that knowledge to an underserved community in San Pedro Sula. Surveys to assess the number and type of containers in the community and the number of containers on the residence identified associations with select socioeconomic factors and other variables based on survey questions. The average number of containers on the premises was 15 (± 2.3) and the most prevalent containers (>50%) were flowerpots, garbage, and toys, which could be targeted in mosquito control programs. This pilot study offers a framework for training community leaders and stakeholders to create a sustainable community-based vector control program for container mosquitoes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Aedes Aegypti Control)
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9 pages, 1461 KiB  
Article
Mosquitocidal Chips Containing the Insect Growth Regulator Pyriproxyfen for Control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)
by Kristen C. Stevens, Roberto M. Pereira and Philip G. Koehler
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(12), 2152; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16122152 - 18 Jun 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2600
Abstract
Aedes aegypti were exposed to water treated with mosquitocidal chips containing the insecticide pyriproxyfen in a polymer formulation. Chips were tested under different conditions; different water volumes, in containers made of different material, and in water with different levels of organic matter. Treated [...] Read more.
Aedes aegypti were exposed to water treated with mosquitocidal chips containing the insecticide pyriproxyfen in a polymer formulation. Chips were tested under different conditions; different water volumes, in containers made of different material, and in water with different levels of organic matter. Treated chips caused 100% mortality of Ae. aegypti during their pupal stage independent of size or type of container, and the mount of organic matter contained in the water to which the mosquito larvae were exposed. When mosquitocidal chips were used in >25% of the oviposition containers within their cages, there was a significant control of the mosquito populations. Mosquitocidal chips worked in different environments, caused significant mosquito population decreases, and were effective in controlling Ae. aegypti. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Aedes Aegypti Control)
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7 pages, 892 KiB  
Article
A Low-Cost, Passive Release Device for the Surveillance and Control of Mosquitoes
by Michael W. C. Kwan, Alexander Bosak, Jedidiah Kline, Mario A. Pita, Nicholas Giel, Roberto M. Pereira, Philip G. Koehler, Daniel L. Kline, Christopher D. Batich and Bradley Jay Willenberg
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1488; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091488 - 27 Apr 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2909
Abstract
Mosquitoes continue to be a major threat to global health, and the ability to reliably monitor, catch, and kill mosquitoes via passive traps is of great importance. Global, low-cost, and easy-to-use outdoor devices are needed to augment existing efforts in mosquito control that [...] Read more.
Mosquitoes continue to be a major threat to global health, and the ability to reliably monitor, catch, and kill mosquitoes via passive traps is of great importance. Global, low-cost, and easy-to-use outdoor devices are needed to augment existing efforts in mosquito control that combat the spread of disease, such as Zika. Thus, we have developed a modular, portable, non-powered (passive), self-contained, and field-deployable device suitable for releasing volatiles with a wide range of applications such as attracting, repelling, and killing mosquitoes. This unique device relies on a novel nested wick and two-reservoir design that achieves a constant release of volatiles over several hundred hours. Devices loaded with one of either two compounds, geraniol or 1-methylpiperazine (MP), were tested in a controlled environment (32 °C and 70% relative humidity), and both compounds achieved a constant release from our devices at a rate of 2.4 mg/h and 47 mg/h, respectively. The liquid payload can be volatile attractants or repellants as well as mosquitocide-containing feeding solutions for capture and surveillance. This low-cost device can be utilized for both civilian and military mosquito control purposes, but it will be particularly important for protecting those in economically repressed environments, such as sub-Saharan Africa and Central and South America. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Aedes Aegypti Control)
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