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Special Issue "Sedentary Behavior and Physical Inactivity in the Asia-Pacific Region: Challenges and Opportunities in a Century of Change"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2023 | Viewed by 1639

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Michael Annear
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokyo 202-021, Japan
Interests: environmental influences on physical activity; determinants of healthy and active aging; sports mega events and population health behavior; environmental health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many adults and children across the Asia-Pacific are not sufficiently physically active to support their health. Rates of obesity, metabolic disorders, and vascular diseases are increasing in both developed and developing societies in this region, which are driven by complex interactions between inactivity, urban lifestyles, population aging, and new modalities of work and leisure. The recent COVID-19 pandemic has added to the challenge through enforced lockdowns, online work/learning, and social distancing, which have further disrupted activity opportunities. This Special Issue aims to highlight emerging research concerning the public health challenge of sedentary behavior and inactivity and elucidate strategies for intervening to improve population health. Manuscripts that are appropriate for this Special Issue should address sedentary behavior and physical inactivity/activity in Asia-Pacific nations as central issues and may consider environmental, behavioral, policy or socio-cultural determinants or interventions. An inclusive definition of the Asia-Pacific is employed in this issue, which encompasses the regions of Oceania and the Pacific, South and Southeast Asia, North-east Asia, and Central Asia. If authors have questions about the suitability of their manuscript or target population, we encourage them to contact the editor of this Special Issue.

Dr. Michael Annear
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • inactivity
  • sedentary behavior
  • lifestyle diseases
  • population aging
  • pandemic
  • urban environment
  • vulnerable populations
  • physical fitness

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Sedentary Behavior and Physical Inactivity in the Asia-Pacific Region: Current Challenges and Emerging Concerns
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9351; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159351 - 30 Jul 2022
Viewed by 635
Abstract
This editorial sets the scene for our Special Issue on the growing problem of sedentary behavior and physical inactivity in the Asia-Pacific region. In many societies, more than 40% of the adult population and growing numbers of children are insufficiently physically active to [...] Read more.
This editorial sets the scene for our Special Issue on the growing problem of sedentary behavior and physical inactivity in the Asia-Pacific region. In many societies, more than 40% of the adult population and growing numbers of children are insufficiently physically active to safeguard their health. This is contributing to high rates of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and other deleterious health outcomes across the region. The Asia-Pacific is heterogeneous and complex, with diverse social, cultural, and environmental barriers that affect intentions and opportunities for regular physical activity. Recently, the problem has been compounded by the acceleration of population aging, the worsening effects of anthropogenic climate change, and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Without strong leadership, enduring funding support, and innovative interventions that cut across policy and society, we may yet be facing a century of unmitigated expansion of morbidity across the Asia-Pacific. Full article

Research

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Article
Risky Play and Social Behaviors among Japanese Preschoolers: Direct Observation Method
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 7889; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137889 - 27 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 725
Abstract
While limited evidence is available, preliminary studies highlight the potential health benefits of risky play. However, most of the studies have used subjective methods (i.e., questionnaires) to evaluate children’s risky play, which limits their validity and reliability. The purpose of the present study [...] Read more.
While limited evidence is available, preliminary studies highlight the potential health benefits of risky play. However, most of the studies have used subjective methods (i.e., questionnaires) to evaluate children’s risky play, which limits their validity and reliability. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the frequency of risky play and social behavior among Japanese preschoolers by using a valid and reliable method such as direct observation. A total of 32 Japanese preschoolers (71.4 ± 3.5 months old) participated in the study, and their social behaviors were measured by the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Data regarding the frequency of risky play was collected through direct observation. Results stated that, in a non-adjusted model, there was no significant association between children’s risky play and prosocial behavior. However, the association became significant after adjusting for covariates such as gender, parental employment status, and physical activity. In contrast, there was no significant association between children’s risky play and problem behavior (hyperactivity and aggression) after adjusting for covariates. In conclusion, covariates such as parental employment should be considered when examining the benefits of risky play. Full article
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