Special Issue "New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Octavio Alvarez
E-Mail Website
Chief Guest Editor
Department of Social Psychology, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: sport psychology; physical education; physical activity; parental styles; leisure time; lifestyle behaviors; motivation (SDT, AGT); leadership (transformational leadership); and values
Dr. Isabel Castillo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social Psychology, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: sport psychology; physical education; physical activity; parental styles; leisure time; lifestyle behaviors; motivation (SDT, AGT); leadership (transformational leadership); values and adolescents
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Pedro Saenz-Lopez Buñuel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education, Music and Plastic Arts, Faculty of Education, University of Huelva, 21004 Huelva, Spain
Interests: PE teaching; motivation and emotion in sport sciences; PE teachers’ education and sport coaches
Dr. Inés Tomás
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Methodology of the Behavioral Sciences, Faculty of Psychology, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: measurement in psychology; psychometric equivalence of questionnaires; questionnaire validation; transcultural comparison; item response theory; differential item functioning; physical self-concept; healthy lifestyles in adolescence

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of IJERPH, we are organizing a Special Issue about the new trends in psychosocial dimensions of physical activity. IJERPH is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes manuscripts in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health.

Psychosocial dimensions have an important presence in the research on physical activity in a broad sense (physical activity, exercise, and sport). The aim of this Special Issue is to present the advances in psychosocial aspects in relation to physical activity participation. Approaches based on strong theoretical frameworks that bring novelty to the topics covered are welcome.

Special attention will be paid to original research (including systematic reviews and methodological approaches to psychosocial aspects of physical activity practice) involving the following topics for this Special issue in IJERPH:

  • Adherence to physical activity practice in young people and adolescents;
  • Adherence to physical activity practice in the general population;
  • Attitudes in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Emotions in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Group dynamics in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Interaction with significant others (i.e., parents, teachers, coaches, peers) and its relation to physical activity participation;
  • Motivational aspects in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Pedagogical approaches that promote physical activity in educational contexts (e.g., physically active learning);
  • Physical activity as a health-related behavior;
  • Prosocial behaviors and citizenship in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Self-perceptions in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Social influences in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Sex role stereotypes in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Values in physical activity, sports, and exercise.

Studies do not necessarily have to offer ‘positive results’ (i.e., results confirming previous literature). Rigorous works where the conclusions offered novelties presenting exceptions to previous studies are also welcome.

Dr. Octavio Alvarez
Dr. Isabel Castillo
Prof. Pedro Saenz-Lopez Buñuel
Dr. Inés Tomás
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • sport psychology
  • adolescents
  • psychosocial aspects
  • social influences
  • values
  • sex role stereotypes

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Social Environmental Antecedents of Athletes’ Emotions
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4997; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094997 - 08 May 2021
Viewed by 396
Abstract
The coach-created motivational climate influences variations in athletes’ motivation and emotional experiences. The present study aimed to examine social environmental antecedents of athletes’ emotions. Participants (N = 262, 52% female, M age = 22.75 ± 6.92) completed questionnaires assessing perceptions of coach-created [...] Read more.
The coach-created motivational climate influences variations in athletes’ motivation and emotional experiences. The present study aimed to examine social environmental antecedents of athletes’ emotions. Participants (N = 262, 52% female, M age = 22.75 ± 6.92) completed questionnaires assessing perceptions of coach-created motivational climates, goal orientations, motivation regulations, and emotions. The mediation effects of goal orientations (i.e., task/ego) and motivation regulations (i.e., autonomous/controlled) on the relationship between motivational climate (i.e., empowering/disempowering) and emotions (i.e., happiness, excitement, anxiety, dejection, and anger) were examined. Structural equation modeling revealed positive direct effects of perceptions of an empowering motivational climate on happiness. Indirect effects of empowering climate to happiness and excitement via task orientation and autonomous motivation emerged. Perceptions of a disempowering climate positively predicted anxiety, dejection, and anger via ego orientation and controlled motivation. Overall, the findings have implications for coach education as they highlight the importance of creating more empowering environments and avoiding or reducing social comparisons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
The Relationship between Motivation and Burnout in Athletes and the Mediating Role of Engagement
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4884; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094884 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 318
Abstract
The purpose of our research was to analyze the relationship among motivation, burnout, and engagement in sports. Five hundred athletes of both sexes from multiple sports modalities took part, with a mean age of 17.39 years (SD = 4.60). The instruments applied were [...] Read more.
The purpose of our research was to analyze the relationship among motivation, burnout, and engagement in sports. Five hundred athletes of both sexes from multiple sports modalities took part, with a mean age of 17.39 years (SD = 4.60). The instruments applied were as follows: Spanish versions of the Sport Motivation Scale (SMS), the Athlete Engagement Questionnaire (AEQ) and the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire (ABQ). Pearson correlations showed that motivation is negatively related to burnout and positively to engagement, while burnout and engagement are inversely related to each other. Through structural equation modeling, it was shown that engagement has a mediating role between motivation and burnout. Furthermore, there are no gender differences in this relationship, although there are differences between athletes who practice individual sports and those who practice collective sports. Encouraging high levels of self-determined motivation can help to increase athletes’ degree of engagement and protect them against burnout and sport withdrawal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
The Father in Youth Baseball: A Self-Determination Theory Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4587; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094587 - 26 Apr 2021
Viewed by 460
Abstract
This study based on the self-determination theory aims to examine the relationship among the aspirations that fathers have about their children’s youth baseball practice, the children’s basic psychological needs (satisfaction and frustration), and their intentions to either continue or drop out of baseball [...] Read more.
This study based on the self-determination theory aims to examine the relationship among the aspirations that fathers have about their children’s youth baseball practice, the children’s basic psychological needs (satisfaction and frustration), and their intentions to either continue or drop out of baseball practice in a sample of children from Hermosillo, Mexico. A cross-sectional study was carried out involving 533 fathers (M = 44.30, SD = 5.18) and 533 children (M = 13.09, SD = 1.68). The results showed that the intrinsic aspirations of fathers were positively correlated to the satisfaction of the children’s psychological needs, whereas the extrinsic aspirations of fathers were positively correlated with the frustration of the children’s psychological needs. Satisfaction of basic psychological needs was positively correlated with the intention to continue and negatively correlated with dropout; on the contrary, frustration of basic psychological needs was negatively correlated with the intention to continue and positively with dropout. In conclusion, the fathers’ pursuit of intrinsic aspirations for their children in the youth baseball context satisfies the children’s basic psychological needs, and in turn, their intention to continue practicing increases. Conversely, when a father pursues extrinsic aspirations for his son in youth baseball, the child will feel his basic psychological needs frustrated, and he will have a greater intention to drop out. Overall, this study extends the existing sport-scientific literature by confirming the impact of parents’ aspirations on their children’s basic psychological needs and intention to continue being baseball players. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
The Transformation of Conflicts into Relational Well-Being in Physical Education: GIAM Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1071; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031071 - 26 Jan 2021
Viewed by 659
Abstract
To educate the relational well-being in order to learn to live together in society is one of the main needs of modern physical education (PE). Teachers are in need of pedagogical models to instruct peaceful coexistence and transform possible conflicts into PE. The [...] Read more.
To educate the relational well-being in order to learn to live together in society is one of the main needs of modern physical education (PE). Teachers are in need of pedagogical models to instruct peaceful coexistence and transform possible conflicts into PE. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of a pedagogical model (GIAM model) designed for conflict transformation on the relational well-being of students in obligatory secondary school (ESO in Spain). This study was an empirical research (associative strategy, comparative study using mixed methods). A number of 287 valid students (M = 14.90; SD = 0.66) participated in this study from 4 different secondary schools (SSs): third ESO (SS1 (n = 75); SS3 (n = 45); SS4 (n = 86)) and fourth ESO (SS2 (n = 81)). A sequence of seven learning sessions was conducted, the intervention of the teachers on the GIAM model and the student’s motivational climate perception caused by this learning sequence was analyzed. The teachers who best adapted their intervention to the GIAM model obtained greater significant changes (p < 0.005) in favor of the relational well-being of their students. This research provides scientific evidence and intervention strategies for students to learn how to transform the conflicts, adopting a collaborating style based on reflection-for, -in- and on-motor action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
Development and Validation of Two Questionnaires to Study the Perception of Conflict in Physical Education
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6241; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176241 - 27 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 759
Abstract
Improving the quality of teaching and learning, as well as school coexistence are international priorities for the new educational challenges of the 21st century (UNESCO 37 C/4 resolution). Physical Education (PE) has become a key subject for education on school coexistence by enabling [...] Read more.
Improving the quality of teaching and learning, as well as school coexistence are international priorities for the new educational challenges of the 21st century (UNESCO 37 C/4 resolution). Physical Education (PE) has become a key subject for education on school coexistence by enabling significant motor experiences to promote interpersonal relationships and transform motor conflicts (MC). The objective of this research was to develop and validate two questionnaires (CONFLICT1-AGE and CONFLICT1-RES) to study secondary school students’ perception about MC in PE. Study 1 searched for evidence related to their content validity and response process validity, and Study 2 examined internal structure, reliability, and concurrent validity. As a result, a seven-item single-factor model was selected for CONFLICT1-AGE, and a five-item single-factor structure was chosen for CONFLICT1-RES. Both models exhibited an excellent fit to the data, where CONFLICT1-AGE: χ2 (df) = 18.621 (14), p = 0.180, RMSEA (90% CI) = 0.033 0(0.000–0.069), CFI = 0.994, TLI = 0.991; CONFLICT1-RES: χ2 (df) = 13.350 (5), p = 0.020, RMSEA (90% CI) = 0.075 (0.027–0.125), CFI = 0.986, TLI = 0.972. Furthermore, both questionnaires presented satisfactory internal consistency (αCONFLICT1-AGE = 0.745, αCONFLICT1-RES = 0.737). Their combination will provide a wide view of secondary school students’ perception about MC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
Relationships between Controlling Interpersonal Coaching Style, Basic Psychological Need Thwarting, and Burnout, in Adolescent Soccer Players
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4909; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134909 - 07 Jul 2020
Viewed by 1189
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationships between a controlling interpersonal style, psychological need thwarting and burnout in adolescent soccer players and to test a structural equation model to analyze whether (a) a controlling interpersonal style is a predictor of [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationships between a controlling interpersonal style, psychological need thwarting and burnout in adolescent soccer players and to test a structural equation model to analyze whether (a) a controlling interpersonal style is a predictor of psychological need thwarting and whether (b) psychological need thwarting is a predictor of burnout. A total of 103 male soccer players between the ages of 12 and 17 participated in the research (M = 14.91; SD = 5.56). The Controlling Coach Behaviors Scale, the Psychological Need Thwarting Scale, and the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire were used to evaluate the variables under study. The analyses revealed significant relationships between a controlling interpersonal style, psychological need thwarting and burnout. Furthermore, the proposed structural equations model, using the partial least squares (PLS) method, showed that a controlling style is a positive predictor of basic psychological need thwarting and that the latter is a predictor of burnout, as well as revealing an indirect relationship between a controlling style and burnout. This indirect effect of the controlling style variable on burnout can be enhanced (or attenuated) by the basic psychological need thwarting variable, which acts as a modulator. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Job Content and Physical Activity on Body Mass Index among Obese Managers of the Mexican Manufacturing Industry
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3969; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113969 - 03 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 946
Abstract
Mental health disorders resulting from work stressors are increasing in the Mexican manufacturing industry and worldwide. Managerial positions in these contexts are highly stressful, and although physical activity may reduce the negative effects of work stress, the relationships between these two aspects regarding [...] Read more.
Mental health disorders resulting from work stressors are increasing in the Mexican manufacturing industry and worldwide. Managerial positions in these contexts are highly stressful, and although physical activity may reduce the negative effects of work stress, the relationships between these two aspects regarding their effects on the body mass index (BMI) of obese managers are scarcely studied. This article aims to study such relationships by using the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) dimensions with the Baecke’s physical activity questionnaire dimensions and analyzing their effects on the BMI. A sample of 255 managers from the Mexican industry, with a (BMI > 30) participated by answering the surveys and providing their weight, their height, and certain sociodemographic information. The research hypotheses were tested using WarpPLS® 6.0 for structural equation modeling. The results for three models featuring acceptable reliability to estimate the direct, indirect, and total effects are presented. The first model showed a medium explanatory power, the variable of job decision-making authority having the greatest direct effect on BMI. The second model showed a medium explanatory power, and the variable of physical activity during leisure-time observed the unique direct effect on BMI. Finally, although the integrating model showed a small explanatory power, both work stress and the physical activity exerted observed direct effects on BMI reduction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
Procrastination at the Core of Physical Activity (PA) and Perceived Quality of Life: A New Approach for Counteracting Lower Levels of PA Practice
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3413; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103413 - 14 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1017
Abstract
Faced with the demonstrated need to engage in physical activity (PA), lack of time is the argument commonly used to justify low or non-existent levels of PA. Underlying this argument, the accomplishment of procrastination behaviour seems to be related to the less time [...] Read more.
Faced with the demonstrated need to engage in physical activity (PA), lack of time is the argument commonly used to justify low or non-existent levels of PA. Underlying this argument, the accomplishment of procrastination behaviour seems to be related to the less time dedicated to practicing PA and the low perception of the quality of life. With this in mind, the purpose of this study is to show that dedicating different amounts of time to PA affects the perceived quality of life and the widespread problem of procrastination. We hypothesise that greater time investment in PA is related to greater perceived quality of life and less procrastination. In all, 621 practitioners of PA (347 men, 274 women) between 18 and 83 years old (M = 35.43, SD = 14.45) filled out validated versions of the World Health Organization quality of life assessment (WHOQOL-BREF) and the Pure Procrastination Scale. Results showed that people who do enough PA have a more positive perception of the quality of life in the domains of physical and psychological health; this perception, in turn, is related to lower levels of procrastination. Likewise, socio-demographic characteristics such as gender and the main activity presented significant associations with various quality of life domains and procrastination. In sum, the benefits of improvements in quality of life and reductions in procrastination identified in this study are sensitive to the time spent on PA, which suggests that a strategy to promote the practice of PA would improve time management and, thus, counteract procrastination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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