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New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (3 April 2023) | Viewed by 73665

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Social Psychology, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: sport psychology; physical education; physical activity; parental styles; leisure time; lifestyle behaviors; motivation (SDT, AGT); leadership (transformational leadership); and values

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social Psychology, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: sport psychology; physical education; physical activity; parental styles; leisure time; lifestyle behaviors; motivation (SDT, AGT); leadership (transformational leadership); values and adolescents
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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education, Music and Plastic Arts, Faculty of Education, University of Huelva, 21004 Huelva, Spain
Interests: PE teaching; motivation and emotion in sport sciences; PE teachers’ education and sport coaches

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Guest Editor
Department of Methodology of the Behavioral Sciences, Faculty of Psychology, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: measurement in psychology; psychometric equivalence of questionnaires; questionnaire validation; transcultural comparison; item response theory; differential item functioning; physical self-concept; healthy lifestyles in adolescence

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of IJERPH, we are organizing a Special Issue about the new trends in psychosocial dimensions of physical activity. IJERPH is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes manuscripts in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health.

Psychosocial dimensions have an important presence in the research on physical activity in a broad sense (physical activity, exercise, and sport). The aim of this Special Issue is to present the advances in psychosocial aspects in relation to physical activity participation. Approaches based on strong theoretical frameworks that bring novelty to the topics covered are welcome.

Special attention will be paid to original research (including systematic reviews and methodological approaches to psychosocial aspects of physical activity practice) involving the following topics for this Special issue in IJERPH:

  • Adherence to physical activity practice in young people and adolescents;
  • Adherence to physical activity practice in the general population;
  • Attitudes in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Emotions in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Group dynamics in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Interaction with significant others (i.e., parents, teachers, coaches, peers) and its relation to physical activity participation;
  • Motivational aspects in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Pedagogical approaches that promote physical activity in educational contexts (e.g., physically active learning);
  • Physical activity as a health-related behavior;
  • Prosocial behaviors and citizenship in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Self-perceptions in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Social influences in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Sex role stereotypes in physical activity, sports, and exercise;
  • Values in physical activity, sports, and exercise.

Studies do not necessarily have to offer ‘positive results’ (i.e., results confirming previous literature). Rigorous works where the conclusions offered novelties presenting exceptions to previous studies are also welcome.

Dr. Octavio Alvarez
Dr. Isabel Castillo
Prof. Pedro Saenz-Lopez Buñuel
Dr. Inés Tomás
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • sport psychology
  • adolescents
  • psychosocial aspects
  • social influences
  • values
  • sex role stereotypes

Published Papers (28 papers)

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13 pages, 1526 KiB  
Article
Perfectionistic Environments and Irrational Beliefs on the Transition to Elite Athletic Performance: A Longitudinal Study
by Yago Ramis, Joan Pons, Saul Alcaraz, Susana Pallares, Carme Viladrich, Juan Muñoz-Justicia and Miquel Torregrossa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(8), 5561; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20085561 - 18 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1669
Abstract
This study aimed to longitudinally evaluate talented athletes’ levels of perfectionism, irrational beliefs, and motivations with regard to their athletic careers. A total of 390 athletes from U14, U16, and junior categories (MageT1 = 15.42) answered shortened versions of the [...] Read more.
This study aimed to longitudinally evaluate talented athletes’ levels of perfectionism, irrational beliefs, and motivations with regard to their athletic careers. A total of 390 athletes from U14, U16, and junior categories (MageT1 = 15.42) answered shortened versions of the Sport-MPS2, iPBI, and BRSQ during two consecutive seasons, along with questions referring to their current and predicted prioritization of sports and education. Participants reported high levels of perfectionistic strivings and medium to low levels of socially prescribed perfectionism and concern over mistakes decreasing from T1 to T2. A decrease was also found for demandingness and awfulizing, but increased levels were found for depreciation in T2. Participants report very high intrinsic motivation with low levels of external regulation and amotivation, but intrinsic motivation decreased from season to season. This general profile varied depending upon future expectancies toward dedication to sports and education. Those who foresaw a prioritized dedication to sports presented significantly higher levels of socially prescribed perfectionism, perfectionistic strivings, and intrinsic motivation, while those who considered that sports would not be prioritized in the following 5 years reported higher levels of demandingness, awfulizing, depreciation, and amotivation. Additionally, while current levels of motivation (T2) seemed to be predicted mainly by previous motivation levels (T1), significant predictive capacity was also detected for socially prescribed perfectionism positively predicting external regulations and amotivation, perfectionistic strivings negatively predicting amotivation, and depreciation negatively predicting intrinsic motivation and positively predicting both extrinsic regulation and amotivation. We discuss the potential perils of developing extremely demanding environments, as they could potentially result in poor motivational profiles of athletes in their talent development stage during the junior to senior transition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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20 pages, 4462 KiB  
Article
Changes in Perceived Mental Load and Motor Performance during Practice-to-Learn and Practice-to-Maintain in Basketball
by Alejandro Gutiérrez-Capote, Iker Madinabeitia, Elisa Torre, Francisco Alarcón, Jesús Jiménez-Martínez and David Cárdenas
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4664; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054664 - 6 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1933
Abstract
Background: Attentional resource allocation during sports practice is associated with the players’ perceived mental load. However, few ecological studies address this problem by considering the players’ characteristics (e.g., practice experience, skill and cognition). Therefore, this study aimed to analyse the dose-response effect of [...] Read more.
Background: Attentional resource allocation during sports practice is associated with the players’ perceived mental load. However, few ecological studies address this problem by considering the players’ characteristics (e.g., practice experience, skill and cognition). Therefore, this study aimed to analyse the dose-response effect of two different types of practice, each with different learning objectives, on mental load and motor performance by using a linear mixed model analysis. Method: Forty-four university students (age 20.36 ± 3.13 years) participated in this study. Two sessions were conducted, one based on a standard rules 1 × 1 basketball situation (“practice to maintain”) and one with motor, temporal and spatial restrictions in 1 × 1 tasks (“practice to learn”). Results: “Practice to learn” produced a higher perceived mental load (NASA-TLX scale) and a worse performance than “practice to maintain”, but was moderated by experience and inhibition (p = 0.001). The same happens in the most demanding restriction (i.e., temporal, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The results showed that increasing the difficulty of 1 × 1 situations through restrictions harmed the player’s performance and increased their perceived mental load. These effects were moderated by previous basketball experience and the player’s inhibition capacity, so the difficulty adjustment should be based on the athletes themselves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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17 pages, 847 KiB  
Article
Understanding Fear after an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Qualitative Thematic Analysis Using the Common-Sense Model
by Cameron Little, Andrew P. Lavender, Cobie Starcevich, Christopher Mesagno, Tim Mitchell, Rodney Whiteley, Hanieh Bakhshayesh and Darren Beales
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 2920; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20042920 - 7 Feb 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3089
Abstract
Fear is a significant factor affecting successful return to sport following an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, there is a lack of understanding of the emotional drivers of fear and how fear beliefs are formed. This study qualitatively explored the contextual and [...] Read more.
Fear is a significant factor affecting successful return to sport following an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, there is a lack of understanding of the emotional drivers of fear and how fear beliefs are formed. This study qualitatively explored the contextual and emotional underpinnings of fear and how these beliefs were formed, with reference to the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation. Face-to-face online interviews were conducted with ACL-injured participants (n = 18, 72% female) with a mean age of 28 years (range 18–50 years). Participants were either 1 year post ACL reconstruction surgery (n = 16) or at least 1 year post injury without surgery (n = 2) and scored above average on a modified Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia. Four participants were playing state-level sport or higher. Five themes emerged describing factors contributing to fear: ‘External messages’, ‘Difficulty of the ACL rehabilitation journey’, ‘Threat to identity and independence’, ‘Socioeconomic factors’, and ‘Ongoing psychological barriers’. A sixth theme, ‘Positive coping strategies’, provided insight into influences that could reduce fear and resolve negative behaviors. This study identified a broad range of contextual biopsychosocial factors which contribute to fear, supporting the notion that ACL injuries should not be treated through a purely physical lens. Furthermore, aligning the themes to the common-sense model provided a conceptual framework conveying the inter-related, emergent nature of the identified themes. The framework provides clinicians with a means to understanding fear after an ACL injury. This could guide assessment and patient education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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12 pages, 1064 KiB  
Article
Be Prosocial My Friend: The Social Disconnection Model of Perfectionism in Adolescents Immersed in Competitive Sport
by Alvaro Rodríguez-Franco, Gustavo Carlo, Pedro Valdivia-Moral and Juan González-Hernández
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 2887; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20042887 - 7 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2274
Abstract
The aim of the present study is to explore the relationships between cognitive–behavioral patterns of perfectionism in the context of competitive sport and both prosociality and aggressiveness in a sample of adolescents competing in federated sports. A cross-sectional and non-randomized study was designed [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study is to explore the relationships between cognitive–behavioral patterns of perfectionism in the context of competitive sport and both prosociality and aggressiveness in a sample of adolescents competing in federated sports. A cross-sectional and non-randomized study was designed using a selective methodology on a sample of adolescents (N = 234) competing in federated sports. Scales to assess aggressiveness, perfectionism, prosocial behavior, and competitiveness were administrated. The results show that as age increases, prosocial behaviors increase and aggressive behaviors and competitiveness decrease, while there was no one significant perfectionist tendency. Competitiveness showed a direct relationship with aggressive (positive) and prosocial behaviors (negative). Self-oriented perfectionistic behavior showed a direct and significant relationship with prosocial behaviors, but no significant relationship with aggressive responses. As P-SP and P-OD tendencies increased, significantly smaller links were shown with prosocial behaviors, but greater links were shown with aggressive behaviors. A path (mediation) model showed a positive and predictive relationship with aggressive behaviors and a negative relationship with prosocial altruistic behaviors. The negative influence of criticism from significant figures in their environment and unrealistic expectations about their performance are relevant to difficulties in self-regulating social relationships in adolescents. Hence, it is a challenge to promote prosocial resources (as a protective value for aggressive behaviors) in the face of the early angst of young athletes, who put their maturity to the test under conditions of high pressure and demands. The present study continues to reinforce the line drawn on perfectionism and prosocial development in young people in sports contexts where young people, measured early on according to their performance, can accentuate and deepen competitive tendencies that alter their adaptive and self-regulatory capacities, as well as their psychosocial projection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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10 pages, 621 KiB  
Article
The Role of Passion in Self-Oriented Versus Team-Oriented Decision-Making in Team Sports
by Jany St-Cyr, Léandre Alexis Chénard-Poirier, Alexe Dufresne and Robert J. Vallerand
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2626; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032626 - 1 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1671
Abstract
This study investigated the role of passion and achievement goals in making self-oriented and team-oriented decisions. Based on the Dualistic Model of Passion, it was hypothesized that in the context of collective sports, harmonious passion should lead to the adoption of mostly mastery [...] Read more.
This study investigated the role of passion and achievement goals in making self-oriented and team-oriented decisions. Based on the Dualistic Model of Passion, it was hypothesized that in the context of collective sports, harmonious passion should lead to the adoption of mostly mastery goals, which in turn should lead to a more team-oriented decision-making. Conversely, obsessive passion should be related to the adoption of all three types of goals but mostly to performance-approach and performance-avoidance goals, which in turn should lead to a more self-oriented decision process. A total of 253 basketball players completed measures of passion and achievement goals in sport. They then were exposed to basketball scenarios and indicated their likelihood to act in a self-oriented or team-oriented manner. Results from structural equation modeling supported the hypotheses and lead to several implications for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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11 pages, 983 KiB  
Article
E-Bicycle as a Green and Physically Active Mode of Transport from the Aspect of Students: TPB and Financial Incentives
by Nenad Djokic, Nikola Milicevic, Branimir Kalas, Ines Djokic and Vera Mirovic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2495; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032495 - 31 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2147
Abstract
The positive effects of e-bikes on physical activity, health, and the environment have been confirmed in many studies. Their choice, as well as of cycling in general, was previously considered from, among others, the socio-psychological aspect (often by use of the theory of [...] Read more.
The positive effects of e-bikes on physical activity, health, and the environment have been confirmed in many studies. Their choice, as well as of cycling in general, was previously considered from, among others, the socio-psychological aspect (often by use of the theory of planned behavior (TPB)) or the financial aspect (in the context of financial incentives). In addition, the question of physical activity can be especially relevant for the student population, since their level of physical activity usually declines. Starting from the previous framework, the aim of this research was to consider the intention to use e-bikes by the student population in the context of their attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and financial incentives. It is, according to the authors’ knowledge, the first research that combines all those variables when studying e-bikes. The research was conducted in 2022 on a convenience sample of 332 students from the University of Novi Sad (Republic of Serbia). The results show that the strongest predictor of the intention to use e-bikes can be attributed to financial incentives, followed by attitudes and subjective norms, while perceived behavioral control is not significant. Besides considerations in the context of previous research, additional recommendations for increasing e-bikes’ use were provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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16 pages, 1503 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Climate on Flourishing and Motivational Outcomes for U.S. Masters Swimmers
by Mary D. Fry, Troy O. Wineinger, Haiying Long, Marta Guivernau, Lori A. Gano-Overway and Susumu Iwasaki
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 1990; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20031990 - 21 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1034
Abstract
The climate in which older adults exercise and participate in sport may play a role in promoting a lifetime commitment to exercising. However, little research has examined the relationship of caring (C) and task-involving (TI) climates, motivation, and well-being with respect to older [...] Read more.
The climate in which older adults exercise and participate in sport may play a role in promoting a lifetime commitment to exercising. However, little research has examined the relationship of caring (C) and task-involving (TI) climates, motivation, and well-being with respect to older adult athletes. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Masters swimmers’ perceptions of the climate, effort, enjoyment, and flourishing as well as explore the mediating effects of effort and enjoyment on the relationship between climate and flourishing. U.S. Masters swimmers (n = 294; Mage = 63.57 years; 84.40% White) with 1–80 years of swimming experience (M = 34.54 years) participating in coach-led programs completed an online survey. The results of latent variable, multiple-mediator analyses via structural equation modeling revealed two important contributions to the literature: (1) when Masters swimmers perceived that they were in C and TI climates, they were more likely to report higher levels of effort and greater enjoyment and flourishing; (2) the Masters swimmers’ effort levels directly influenced their flourishing, mediating the relationship between climates and flourishing. This research has important implications for practice and policy, as U.S. Masters Swimming appears to be a fruitful avenue for promoting an enjoyable physical activity that can be experienced throughout a lifetime. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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10 pages, 327 KiB  
Article
Prolonged Sitting in University Students: An Intra-Individual Study Exploring Physical Activity Value as a Deterrent
by Alex C. Garn and Kelly L. Simonton
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 1891; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20031891 - 19 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1267
Abstract
University students are a subpopulation of young adults highly susceptible to prolonged bouts of sitting. The purpose of this study was to investigate university students’ intra-individual patterns of prolonged daily sitting, exploring gender and physical activity value beliefs as covariates. A total of [...] Read more.
University students are a subpopulation of young adults highly susceptible to prolonged bouts of sitting. The purpose of this study was to investigate university students’ intra-individual patterns of prolonged daily sitting, exploring gender and physical activity value beliefs as covariates. A total of 71 students reported the number of days each week they spent in bouts of prolonged sitting (2 + continuous hours) over a five-week timeframe. The findings revealed that at the beginning of the study, the students spent about four days per week in prolonged bouts of sitting although there was substantial variability in the sample. Intra-individual changes over the five weeks occurred in a non-linear fashion with a variability in these trajectories. Men reported approximately one less day of prolonged sitting per week although gender did not predict changes over time. Physical activity value beliefs were negatively related to prolonged bouts of sitting when averaged across time. The results illustrate the variable nature of prolonged sitting in university student populations, highlighting the need for implementing individualized intervention strategies targeting sedentary behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
11 pages, 712 KiB  
Article
Psychosocial Predictors of Drop-Out from Organised Sport: A Prospective Study in Adolescent Soccer
by Jenny Back, Andreas Stenling, Bård Erlend Solstad, Petra Svedberg, Urban Johnson, Nikos Ntoumanis, Henrik Gustafsson and Andreas Ivarsson
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16585; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416585 - 9 Dec 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2333
Abstract
In recent years an increased drop-out rate in adolescents’ soccer participation has been observed. Given the potentially adverse consequences of drop-out from soccer, more information about risk factors for drop-out is warranted. In the current study, Classification and Regression Tree (CRT) analysis was [...] Read more.
In recent years an increased drop-out rate in adolescents’ soccer participation has been observed. Given the potentially adverse consequences of drop-out from soccer, more information about risk factors for drop-out is warranted. In the current study, Classification and Regression Tree (CRT) analysis was used to investigate demographic and motivational factors associated with an increased risk of drop-out from adolescent soccer. The results of this study indicate that older age, experiencing less autonomy support from the coach, less intrinsic motivation, being female, and lower socioeconomic status are factors associated with an increased risk of drop-out. An interpretation of the results of this study is that coaches play a central part in creating a sports context that facilitates motivation and continued soccer participation. Based on the findings of the current study we propose that soccer clubs implement theoretically informed coach education programs to help coaches adopt autonomy-supportive coaching strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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10 pages, 327 KiB  
Article
Factors Related to Adolescents’ Participation in Organized Sports
by Gwennyth E. Spruijtenburg, Femke van Abswoude, Sebastiaan Platvoet, Mark de Niet, Hidde Bekhuis and Bert Steenbergen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15872; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315872 - 29 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1590
Abstract
Participation in organized sports has important health benefits in adolescence, yet participation rates are concerning. A better understanding of factors influencing adolescents’ participation in organized sports offers opportunities to improve participation rates. The aim of this study was to examine to what extent [...] Read more.
Participation in organized sports has important health benefits in adolescence, yet participation rates are concerning. A better understanding of factors influencing adolescents’ participation in organized sports offers opportunities to improve participation rates. The aim of this study was to examine to what extent motives, perceived competence, encouragement and motor skills were associated with participation in organized sports in a sample of first-year secondary school students. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected from 386 Dutch adolescents (11–14 years) in October and November 2020. A series of multilevel logistic regression models estimated the likelihood of adolescents’ participating in organized sports. First, we examined whether motives, perceived competence, encouragement and motor skills were independently associated with the likelihood of participation. Second, we examined whether these factors were concurrently associated with the likelihood of participation. When considered individually, motives, perceived competence, encouragement and motor skills were significantly associated with participation. When considered together, only motives were significantly associated with participation and the associations of all other factors with sport disappeared. These findings show the importance of motivation for participation in sports over other factors. These findings inform the development of interventions aimed at improving adolescents’ participation rates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
14 pages, 1165 KiB  
Article
Sports and Social Interaction: Sports Experiences and Attitudes of the Urban Running Community
by Jia Yang, Fang-Yuan Ju and Zu-Guo Tian
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14412; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114412 - 3 Nov 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2222
Abstract
Social change and development influence the motivational factors of people’s sports participation, exposing the need for socialization and interaction. The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction pattern of the urban running community and the behavior pattern of runners with the [...] Read more.
Social change and development influence the motivational factors of people’s sports participation, exposing the need for socialization and interaction. The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction pattern of the urban running community and the behavior pattern of runners with the help of social interaction theory, and to explore the inner connection between their community movement and social interaction. Ten senior members of marathon urban running societies were selected to conduct two rounds of in-depth interviews which were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis to understand the sports participation experiences and social interactions of running society members. The study found that the whole interaction process of running groups is accomplished through three aspects: examination of self, adjustment with reference to others, and a sense of group belonging as the core consciousness. On the other hand, the social attributes of running groups can advance the personalization process of runners in society, which is mainly characterized by self-presentation and external constraints, self-requirement and group constraints, intergroup interaction and group identity reorganization. In addition, the unique community culture, standardized group organization and harmonious activity atmosphere will stimulate runners’ interest in running, strengthen community communication and establish stable community relations, etc., which in turn will bring about continuous interactive behaviors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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17 pages, 1050 KiB  
Article
Students’ Motivational and Emotional Experiences in Physical Education across Profiles of Extracurricular Physical Activity: The Influence in the Intention to Be Active
by Sebastián Fierro-Suero, Eduardo José Fernández-Ozcorta and Pedro Sáenz-López
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9539; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159539 - 3 Aug 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2637
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between extracurricular physical activity (PA) levels and students’ motivational and emotional experience during physical education (PE) classes and how this psychological experience can predict the intention to be physically active. The sample consisted of 811 Spanish secondary education [...] Read more.
This study examined the relationship between extracurricular physical activity (PA) levels and students’ motivational and emotional experience during physical education (PE) classes and how this psychological experience can predict the intention to be physically active. The sample consisted of 811 Spanish secondary education students (371 boys and 440 girls) aged between 11 and 17 years (M = 13.15, SD = 1.16). Students completed questionnaires about their PA levels, their intention to be physically active, and their motivational and emotional experience during PE classes. A cluster analysis was used to classify the students according to their level of extracurricular PA. Based on a regression analysis, the variables enjoyment, pride, hopelessness, competence, satisfaction, and autonomous motivation played the highest role, predicting the intention to be physically active in the future. Statistical differences were found among the different PA profiles in these variables during the PE classes (MANCOVA). In conclusion, hours of PA outside school have a high relationship with the students’ emotional and motivational experience in their PE classes, which is related with the intention to practise PA in the future. A series of strategies have been proposed at both the institutional level and the teacher level to improve the PE psychological experience of those students who practise less extracurricular PA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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11 pages, 1143 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Happy Sport, an Emotional Education Program for Assertive Conflict Resolution in Sports
by Agnès Ros-Morente, Miriam Farré, Carla Quesada-Pallarès and Gemma Filella
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(5), 2596; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052596 - 23 Feb 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3110
Abstract
Background: Interpersonal conflicts occur in any kind of social relation, including the field of sports. Proper emotional management can improve athletes’ well-being, coexistence, and performance. This study presents the initial results of the gamified emotional education program Happy Sport in a sample of [...] Read more.
Background: Interpersonal conflicts occur in any kind of social relation, including the field of sports. Proper emotional management can improve athletes’ well-being, coexistence, and performance. This study presents the initial results of the gamified emotional education program Happy Sport in a sample of athletes in the field of non-formal education. Methods: The study sample consists of 194 athletes from the benjamín and alevín categories (3rd- to 6th-grade primary school children). A quasi-experimental pre-intervention and post-intervention design with a control group is followed using the Games and Emotions Scale (GES), Social Support Scale, Emotion Regulation Questionnaire for Children and Adolescents (ERQ-CA), and Bullying in Sports Questionnaire. Results: Statistically significant differences were found across participants in the experimental group between the pre- and post-intervention evaluations for the variables satisfaction and bullying. An analysis of the competencies related to emotion regulation revealed significant results for the experimental group for both scales (cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression). Conclusions: The results show that after a training session with the gamified software Happy Sport, children’s satisfaction increased and bullying levels decreased. Changes in cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression may also be explained by the training received. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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14 pages, 6854 KiB  
Article
Psychometric Assessment of the Need Satisfaction and Frustration Scale with Professional Romanian Athletes
by Dan Iulian Alexe, Beatrice Aurelia Abalasei, Gabriel Mares, Bogdan Constantin Rata, Teodora Mihaela Iconomescu, Georgeta Mitrache and Rafael Burgueño
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1696; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031696 - 1 Feb 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2161
Abstract
Background: Although athletes’ experiences of autonomy, competence, and relatedness play in key role in their motivation, performance-related outcomes, and wellness, there is no evidence to date on measures of autonomy, competence, and relatedness in the Romanian sport context. Building upon self-determination theory, the [...] Read more.
Background: Although athletes’ experiences of autonomy, competence, and relatedness play in key role in their motivation, performance-related outcomes, and wellness, there is no evidence to date on measures of autonomy, competence, and relatedness in the Romanian sport context. Building upon self-determination theory, the objective of this research was to adapt the Need Satisfaction and Frustration Scale and analyze its psychometric properties in the Romanian sport context. Methods: The participants were 642 professional athletes (354 males and 288 females; Mage = 22.81, SD = 5.78) who competed at the international and/or national level. Results: The results from confirmatory factor analyses psychometrically supported a six-factor correlated model, which was invariant across gender, age, and sport. Convergent validity was met by average variance extracted values between 0.60 and 0.74. Discriminant validity was underpinned by values from −0.72 to 0.72 for a heterotrait–monotrait ratio of correlations among the six factors. Reliability was endorsed by Cronbach’s alpha scores between 0.75 and 0.89, and between 0.76 and 0.89 for Raykov’s composite reliability coefficient. Criterion validity was supported by positive relationships of autonomy, competence, and relatedness satisfaction to autonomous motivation, and positive associations of autonomy, competence, and relatedness frustration with controlled motivation and amotivation. Conclusions: The Need Satisfaction and Frustration Scale is shown to be a valid and reliable measure of need satisfaction and frustration in professional Romanian athletes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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9 pages, 355 KiB  
Article
Analysis of the Different Scenarios of Coach’s Anger on the Performance of Youth Basketball Teams
by Victor Hugo Duque, Pedro Saenz-López, Miguel Ángel Gómez-Ruano, Sergio J. Ibáñez-Godoy, Cristina Conde, Bartolomé J. Almagro and José Antonio Rebollo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 459; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010459 - 1 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2013
Abstract
In spite of the negative effects of anger, coaches are often seen becoming angry during games. This is especially worrying in U18 categories. Thus, the objective of this study was to identify the influence that the coach’s anger has on the performance of [...] Read more.
In spite of the negative effects of anger, coaches are often seen becoming angry during games. This is especially worrying in U18 categories. Thus, the objective of this study was to identify the influence that the coach’s anger has on the performance of a basketball team in competition. For this, an ad hoc observation tool was designed, in which 587 moments of anger from the coaching staff (64 coaches) were recorded in the 24 semi-final and final matches of the Spanish Autonomous Region Team Championships in 2019 and 2020 in the infantil (M = 14 years old) and cadete (M = 16 years old) categories. The results show that, in response to most incidents of coach anger, the performance of the team did not change. Significant differences were identified in some scenarios, with low- or medium-intensity anger targeted at the defence, where the team performance improved. However, anger towards the referee in the last quarter with scores level had a negative influence on the team’s performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
12 pages, 835 KiB  
Article
The Role of Dispositional Orientations and Goal Motives on Athletes’ Well- and Ill-Being
by Natalia Martínez-González, Francisco L. Atienza, Joan L. Duda and Isabel Balaguer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010289 - 28 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1711
Abstract
Findings in different contexts suggest that task orientation and ego orientation are related to adaptive and maladaptive motivational patterns, respectively. In sport, these personal dispositions could influence other important variables such as the goals that athletes pursue (and why they pursue them) during [...] Read more.
Findings in different contexts suggest that task orientation and ego orientation are related to adaptive and maladaptive motivational patterns, respectively. In sport, these personal dispositions could influence other important variables such as the goals that athletes pursue (and why they pursue them) during the season and their well- and ill-being. The main purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between athletes’ dispositional goal orientations, their goal motives, and their reported well-being (subjective vitality) and ill-being (physical and emotional exhaustion). The study involved 414 Spanish university athletes (206 female and 208 male) with an age range of 17 to 33 years (M = 20.61; SD = 2.58) that completed a package of questionnaires at the beginning of the season. Results of path analysis revealed that athletes’ task orientation was negatively associated to physical and emotional exhaustion indirectly through autonomous and controlled goal motives. In contrast, ego orientation was positively related to physical and emotional exhaustion via its link to controlled goal motives. Athletes’ task orientation directly and positively predicted subjective vitality, even though goal motives were not significant mediators. These findings support previous evidence about the protective role of athletes’ task orientation, in contrast to ego orientation, confirming its positive relationship with well-being and its negative one with ill-being. Additionally, it extends the knowledge regarding interdependencies between goal orientations and goal motives and how both contribute to athletes’ optimal or compromised functioning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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12 pages, 343 KiB  
Article
Positive Behavior Management: Assessment of Rugby Referees in Children Sport
by Katarzyna Płoszaj, Wiesław Firek, Paweł Gąsior and Ewa Malchrowicz-Mośko
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10949; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010949 - 18 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1824
Abstract
During children’s sports competitions, the referees play a special role. The referees are expected to be able to identify behavioral problems (of players, coaches, and fans), applying specific techniques to prevent negative behavior of players. Adapting these actions to the specifics of the [...] Read more.
During children’s sports competitions, the referees play a special role. The referees are expected to be able to identify behavioral problems (of players, coaches, and fans), applying specific techniques to prevent negative behavior of players. Adapting these actions to the specifics of the group or individuals is crucial in providing a safe educational environment that promotes child development. The main objective of this research was to assess the quality of referees’ interactions with players in terms of positive behavior management and proficiency during rugby matches of children aged 6–12 years. Twenty-three rugby referees officiating matches organized by the Polish Rugby Union in Poland participated in the study. The research used the Referee–Players’ Interaction Assessment Scoring System tool. Additionally, referee–player interactions were recorded with a GoPro 8 camera along with audio from a wireless intercom. The significance of differences between the ratings for each indicator was tested by chi-squared test, while a non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the mean ratings of positive behavior management and proficiency. The Mann–Whitney U-test was used to compare differences between assessments of experienced and inexperienced referees. The observations showed that referees were rated significantly higher in the proficiency dimension than in positive behavior management dimension. Nevertheless, both ratings represent an average level of quality of interactions with the players. The referee’s experience did not determine the quality of his or her interactions with the players in the specific dimensions. The following conclusion was drawn from the research: referees should be trained in the methods and techniques for managing player behavior and should act to prevent the occurrence of negative behavior, by presenting clear and understandable expectations to players before the match and using preventive measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
12 pages, 373 KiB  
Article
Health-Related Quality of Life and Physical Activity in a Community Setting
by Marta Gil-Lacruz, Ana Isabel Gil-Lacruz, Paola Domingo-Torrecilla and Miguel Angel Cañete-Lairla
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7301; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147301 - 8 Jul 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2924
Abstract
This article analyses how physical activity reinforces each of the dimensions (mental, physical, social, etc.) of the health-related quality of life concept. To that end, we determined whether this relationship is moderated by educational level and area of residence. The empirical part was [...] Read more.
This article analyses how physical activity reinforces each of the dimensions (mental, physical, social, etc.) of the health-related quality of life concept. To that end, we determined whether this relationship is moderated by educational level and area of residence. The empirical part was based on data obtained from a cross-sectional survey carried out in the Casablanca neighbourhood (Zaragoza, Spain). The sample comprised 1083 participants aged between 25 and 84 years residing in the three residential areas of this neighbourhood: Viñedo Viejo, Las Nieves and Fuentes Claras. These three areas exhibit significant socio-economic differences in their population. The self-reported questionnaire included the following key information for this study: socio-economic characteristics (sex, age, educational level and area of residence) and health-related quality of life (WHOQOL-Brief: mental health, physical health, social relations and environment). The main results obtained from the descriptive statistics and regression systems were added. Playing a sport or undertaking some physical activity brings many health benefits, both physical and mental. The educational level and area of residence affect this relationship, such that the effects of physical activity are greater for those residents of Casablanca who have a higher educational level and/or live in more favoured areas of this neighbourhood. The results have also been discussed by sex and age group. Investing in innovative programmes in educational institutions and communities to acquire healthy habits and behaviour patterns that take into account socioeconomic differences in the population would be an advisable public health strategy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
14 pages, 953 KiB  
Article
Examining Controlling Styles of Significant Others and Their Implications for Motivation, Boredom and Burnout in Young Swimmers
by Octavio Alvarez, Lluis Tormo-Barahona, Isabel Castillo and Juan Antonio Moreno-Murcia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5828; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18115828 - 28 May 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3909
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the controlling style in two contexts of social influence: the team (i.e., coach and teammates) and the family (i.e., father and mother), as well as the mediational role of motivation (autonomous, controlled, and amotivation) and [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to examine the controlling style in two contexts of social influence: the team (i.e., coach and teammates) and the family (i.e., father and mother), as well as the mediational role of motivation (autonomous, controlled, and amotivation) and its relationship with boredom and burnout in young swimmers. To this end, 267 swimmers (140 girls and 127 boys) between 12 and 18 years of age (M = 14.26; SD = 1.61) were assessed. The results showed that in the team context, coaches’ controlling style directly promoted controlled motivation and boredom in their swimmers, and indirectly influenced burnout through the mediating role of swimmers’ controlled motivation. Teammates’ controlling style was directly associated with controlled motivation, amotivation, and burnout, and indirectly associated with boredom and burnout through the mediating role of amotivation. Regarding the family context, the father’s controlling style showed direct associations with controlled motivation and burnout, and indirect associations with boredom through the mediating role of swimmers’ controlled motivation. Finally, the associations of the mother’s controlling style with all the variables studied were neutralized by the father’s controlling interpersonal style. This study emphasizes the differentiating role of significant others when displaying controlling styles, and it confirms that the controlling style has a significant relationship with maladaptive sport practice experiences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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13 pages, 611 KiB  
Article
Social Environmental Antecedents of Athletes’ Emotions
by Montse C. Ruiz, Paul R. Appleton, Joan L. Duda, Laura Bortoli and Claudio Robazza
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4997; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094997 - 8 May 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4236 | Correction
Abstract
The coach-created motivational climate influences variations in athletes’ motivation and emotional experiences. The present study aimed to examine social environmental antecedents of athletes’ emotions. Participants (N = 262, 52% female, M age = 22.75 ± 6.92) completed questionnaires assessing perceptions of coach-created [...] Read more.
The coach-created motivational climate influences variations in athletes’ motivation and emotional experiences. The present study aimed to examine social environmental antecedents of athletes’ emotions. Participants (N = 262, 52% female, M age = 22.75 ± 6.92) completed questionnaires assessing perceptions of coach-created motivational climates, goal orientations, motivation regulations, and emotions. The mediation effects of goal orientations (i.e., task/ego) and motivation regulations (i.e., autonomous/controlled) on the relationship between motivational climate (i.e., empowering/disempowering) and emotions (i.e., happiness, excitement, anxiety, dejection, and anger) were examined. Structural equation modeling revealed positive direct effects of perceptions of an empowering motivational climate on happiness. Indirect effects of empowering climate to happiness and excitement via task orientation and autonomous motivation emerged. Perceptions of a disempowering climate positively predicted anxiety, dejection, and anger via ego orientation and controlled motivation. Overall, the findings have implications for coach education as they highlight the importance of creating more empowering environments and avoiding or reducing social comparisons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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10 pages, 503 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between Motivation and Burnout in Athletes and the Mediating Role of Engagement
by Mar Graña, Cristina De Francisco and Constantino Arce
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4884; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094884 - 4 May 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3813
Abstract
The purpose of our research was to analyze the relationship among motivation, burnout, and engagement in sports. Five hundred athletes of both sexes from multiple sports modalities took part, with a mean age of 17.39 years (SD = 4.60). The instruments applied were [...] Read more.
The purpose of our research was to analyze the relationship among motivation, burnout, and engagement in sports. Five hundred athletes of both sexes from multiple sports modalities took part, with a mean age of 17.39 years (SD = 4.60). The instruments applied were as follows: Spanish versions of the Sport Motivation Scale (SMS), the Athlete Engagement Questionnaire (AEQ) and the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire (ABQ). Pearson correlations showed that motivation is negatively related to burnout and positively to engagement, while burnout and engagement are inversely related to each other. Through structural equation modeling, it was shown that engagement has a mediating role between motivation and burnout. Furthermore, there are no gender differences in this relationship, although there are differences between athletes who practice individual sports and those who practice collective sports. Encouraging high levels of self-determined motivation can help to increase athletes’ degree of engagement and protect them against burnout and sport withdrawal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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13 pages, 988 KiB  
Article
The Father in Youth Baseball: A Self-Determination Theory Approach
by Manuel De La Cruz, Jorge Zamarripa and Isabel Castillo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4587; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094587 - 26 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2763
Abstract
This study based on the self-determination theory aims to examine the relationship among the aspirations that fathers have about their children’s youth baseball practice, the children’s basic psychological needs (satisfaction and frustration), and their intentions to either continue or drop out of baseball [...] Read more.
This study based on the self-determination theory aims to examine the relationship among the aspirations that fathers have about their children’s youth baseball practice, the children’s basic psychological needs (satisfaction and frustration), and their intentions to either continue or drop out of baseball practice in a sample of children from Hermosillo, Mexico. A cross-sectional study was carried out involving 533 fathers (M = 44.30, SD = 5.18) and 533 children (M = 13.09, SD = 1.68). The results showed that the intrinsic aspirations of fathers were positively correlated to the satisfaction of the children’s psychological needs, whereas the extrinsic aspirations of fathers were positively correlated with the frustration of the children’s psychological needs. Satisfaction of basic psychological needs was positively correlated with the intention to continue and negatively correlated with dropout; on the contrary, frustration of basic psychological needs was negatively correlated with the intention to continue and positively with dropout. In conclusion, the fathers’ pursuit of intrinsic aspirations for their children in the youth baseball context satisfies the children’s basic psychological needs, and in turn, their intention to continue practicing increases. Conversely, when a father pursues extrinsic aspirations for his son in youth baseball, the child will feel his basic psychological needs frustrated, and he will have a greater intention to drop out. Overall, this study extends the existing sport-scientific literature by confirming the impact of parents’ aspirations on their children’s basic psychological needs and intention to continue being baseball players. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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20 pages, 815 KiB  
Article
The Transformation of Conflicts into Relational Well-Being in Physical Education: GIAM Model
by Aaron Rillo-Albert, Pere Lavega-Burgués, Queralt Prat, Antoni Costes, Verónica Muñoz-Arroyave and Unai Sáez de Ocáriz
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1071; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031071 - 26 Jan 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3567
Abstract
To educate the relational well-being in order to learn to live together in society is one of the main needs of modern physical education (PE). Teachers are in need of pedagogical models to instruct peaceful coexistence and transform possible conflicts into PE. The [...] Read more.
To educate the relational well-being in order to learn to live together in society is one of the main needs of modern physical education (PE). Teachers are in need of pedagogical models to instruct peaceful coexistence and transform possible conflicts into PE. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of a pedagogical model (GIAM model) designed for conflict transformation on the relational well-being of students in obligatory secondary school (ESO in Spain). This study was an empirical research (associative strategy, comparative study using mixed methods). A number of 287 valid students (M = 14.90; SD = 0.66) participated in this study from 4 different secondary schools (SSs): third ESO (SS1 (n = 75); SS3 (n = 45); SS4 (n = 86)) and fourth ESO (SS2 (n = 81)). A sequence of seven learning sessions was conducted, the intervention of the teachers on the GIAM model and the student’s motivational climate perception caused by this learning sequence was analyzed. The teachers who best adapted their intervention to the GIAM model obtained greater significant changes (p < 0.005) in favor of the relational well-being of their students. This research provides scientific evidence and intervention strategies for students to learn how to transform the conflicts, adopting a collaborating style based on reflection-for, -in- and on-motor action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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16 pages, 511 KiB  
Article
Development and Validation of Two Questionnaires to Study the Perception of Conflict in Physical Education
by Unai Sáez de Ocáriz and Pere Lavega-Burgués
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6241; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176241 - 27 Aug 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3109
Abstract
Improving the quality of teaching and learning, as well as school coexistence are international priorities for the new educational challenges of the 21st century (UNESCO 37 C/4 resolution). Physical Education (PE) has become a key subject for education on school coexistence by enabling [...] Read more.
Improving the quality of teaching and learning, as well as school coexistence are international priorities for the new educational challenges of the 21st century (UNESCO 37 C/4 resolution). Physical Education (PE) has become a key subject for education on school coexistence by enabling significant motor experiences to promote interpersonal relationships and transform motor conflicts (MC). The objective of this research was to develop and validate two questionnaires (CONFLICT1-AGE and CONFLICT1-RES) to study secondary school students’ perception about MC in PE. Study 1 searched for evidence related to their content validity and response process validity, and Study 2 examined internal structure, reliability, and concurrent validity. As a result, a seven-item single-factor model was selected for CONFLICT1-AGE, and a five-item single-factor structure was chosen for CONFLICT1-RES. Both models exhibited an excellent fit to the data, where CONFLICT1-AGE: χ2 (df) = 18.621 (14), p = 0.180, RMSEA (90% CI) = 0.033 0(0.000–0.069), CFI = 0.994, TLI = 0.991; CONFLICT1-RES: χ2 (df) = 13.350 (5), p = 0.020, RMSEA (90% CI) = 0.075 (0.027–0.125), CFI = 0.986, TLI = 0.972. Furthermore, both questionnaires presented satisfactory internal consistency (αCONFLICT1-AGE = 0.745, αCONFLICT1-RES = 0.737). Their combination will provide a wide view of secondary school students’ perception about MC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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13 pages, 1197 KiB  
Article
Relationships between Controlling Interpersonal Coaching Style, Basic Psychological Need Thwarting, and Burnout, in Adolescent Soccer Players
by Verónica Morales-Sánchez, Miriam Crespillo-Jurado, David Jiménez-López, Juan P. Morillo-Baro, Antonio Hernández-Mendo and Rafael E. Reigal
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4909; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134909 - 7 Jul 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4493
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationships between a controlling interpersonal style, psychological need thwarting and burnout in adolescent soccer players and to test a structural equation model to analyze whether (a) a controlling interpersonal style is a predictor of [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationships between a controlling interpersonal style, psychological need thwarting and burnout in adolescent soccer players and to test a structural equation model to analyze whether (a) a controlling interpersonal style is a predictor of psychological need thwarting and whether (b) psychological need thwarting is a predictor of burnout. A total of 103 male soccer players between the ages of 12 and 17 participated in the research (M = 14.91; SD = 5.56). The Controlling Coach Behaviors Scale, the Psychological Need Thwarting Scale, and the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire were used to evaluate the variables under study. The analyses revealed significant relationships between a controlling interpersonal style, psychological need thwarting and burnout. Furthermore, the proposed structural equations model, using the partial least squares (PLS) method, showed that a controlling style is a positive predictor of basic psychological need thwarting and that the latter is a predictor of burnout, as well as revealing an indirect relationship between a controlling style and burnout. This indirect effect of the controlling style variable on burnout can be enhanced (or attenuated) by the basic psychological need thwarting variable, which acts as a modulator. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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22 pages, 1297 KiB  
Article
Effects of Job Content and Physical Activity on Body Mass Index among Obese Managers of the Mexican Manufacturing Industry
by Oziely Daniela Armenta-Hernandez, Aidé Aracely Maldonado-Macias, Margarita Ortiz Solís, Miguel Ángel Serrano-Rosa, Yolanda Angélica Baez-López and Juan Luis Hernández-Arellano
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3969; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113969 - 3 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2760
Abstract
Mental health disorders resulting from work stressors are increasing in the Mexican manufacturing industry and worldwide. Managerial positions in these contexts are highly stressful, and although physical activity may reduce the negative effects of work stress, the relationships between these two aspects regarding [...] Read more.
Mental health disorders resulting from work stressors are increasing in the Mexican manufacturing industry and worldwide. Managerial positions in these contexts are highly stressful, and although physical activity may reduce the negative effects of work stress, the relationships between these two aspects regarding their effects on the body mass index (BMI) of obese managers are scarcely studied. This article aims to study such relationships by using the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) dimensions with the Baecke’s physical activity questionnaire dimensions and analyzing their effects on the BMI. A sample of 255 managers from the Mexican industry, with a (BMI > 30) participated by answering the surveys and providing their weight, their height, and certain sociodemographic information. The research hypotheses were tested using WarpPLS® 6.0 for structural equation modeling. The results for three models featuring acceptable reliability to estimate the direct, indirect, and total effects are presented. The first model showed a medium explanatory power, the variable of job decision-making authority having the greatest direct effect on BMI. The second model showed a medium explanatory power, and the variable of physical activity during leisure-time observed the unique direct effect on BMI. Finally, although the integrating model showed a small explanatory power, both work stress and the physical activity exerted observed direct effects on BMI reduction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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11 pages, 375 KiB  
Article
Procrastination at the Core of Physical Activity (PA) and Perceived Quality of Life: A New Approach for Counteracting Lower Levels of PA Practice
by Nuria Codina, José V. Pestana, Rafael Valenzuela and Nuria Giménez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3413; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103413 - 14 May 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3743
Abstract
Faced with the demonstrated need to engage in physical activity (PA), lack of time is the argument commonly used to justify low or non-existent levels of PA. Underlying this argument, the accomplishment of procrastination behaviour seems to be related to the less time [...] Read more.
Faced with the demonstrated need to engage in physical activity (PA), lack of time is the argument commonly used to justify low or non-existent levels of PA. Underlying this argument, the accomplishment of procrastination behaviour seems to be related to the less time dedicated to practicing PA and the low perception of the quality of life. With this in mind, the purpose of this study is to show that dedicating different amounts of time to PA affects the perceived quality of life and the widespread problem of procrastination. We hypothesise that greater time investment in PA is related to greater perceived quality of life and less procrastination. In all, 621 practitioners of PA (347 men, 274 women) between 18 and 83 years old (M = 35.43, SD = 14.45) filled out validated versions of the World Health Organization quality of life assessment (WHOQOL-BREF) and the Pure Procrastination Scale. Results showed that people who do enough PA have a more positive perception of the quality of life in the domains of physical and psychological health; this perception, in turn, is related to lower levels of procrastination. Likewise, socio-demographic characteristics such as gender and the main activity presented significant associations with various quality of life domains and procrastination. In sum, the benefits of improvements in quality of life and reductions in procrastination identified in this study are sensitive to the time spent on PA, which suggests that a strategy to promote the practice of PA would improve time management and, thus, counteract procrastination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)

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2 pages, 253 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Ruiz et al. Social Environmental Antecedents of Athletes’ Emotions. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4997
by Montse C. Ruiz, Paul R. Appleton, Joan L. Duda, Laura Bortoli and Claudio Robazza
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6756; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136756 - 23 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1296
Abstract
In the original article [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychosocial Dimensions of Physical Activity)
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