Special Issue "Leisure and Time Management in Fostering Wellbeing and Health: Current Issues and New Trends"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nuria Codina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social Psychology and Quantitative Psychology, 08035 University of Barcelona, Spain
Interests: psychology of leisure; leisure activities; leisure experience; leisure time; physical activity; time management; procrastination; time perspective; wellbeing, self and identity
Dr. Isabel Castillo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social Psychology, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: sport psychology; physical education; physical activity; parental styles; leisure time; lifestyle behaviors; motivation (SDT, AGT); leadership (transformational leadership); values and adolescents
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Leisure has the potential to promote well-being and health more than other areas of human activity. In this sense, it is important to promote the visibility of the incidence of leisure in general, leisure experiences and leisure activities—practicing from physical activity to cultural consumption, hobbies, music, sports, and intergenerational activities—in the physical and mental health of people (of any age, social condition, cultural capital, and changing sociocultural and personal contexts). Moreover, due to the link between a predominantly autonomous use of time and the enjoyment of leisure time, possibilities, capacities, habits, and attitudes (personal, social, cultural) regarding time management are of special importance too.

Based on this broad spectrum of analysis, this Special Issue will present advances in psychosocial knowledge about current issues and new trends in leisure and time management. Contributions based on strong theoretical frameworks that bring novelty to the topics covered, as well as qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method research are welcome.

Dr. Nuria Codina
Dr. Isabel Castillo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • leisure activities
  • leisure experience
  • leisure time
  • cultural activity
  • physical activity
  • social influence
  • procrastination
  • time perspective
  • quality of life
  • well-/ill-being

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Influence of Power on Leisure: Implications for Inclusive Leisure Services
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2220; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052220 - 24 Feb 2021
Viewed by 679
Abstract
Many people experience domination as they encounter oppression and marginalization because of power differentials limiting their leisure. We rely on Foucault for guidance to examine connections between power and opportunities for people to be included in leisure and recognize that, like Foucault, we [...] Read more.
Many people experience domination as they encounter oppression and marginalization because of power differentials limiting their leisure. We rely on Foucault for guidance to examine connections between power and opportunities for people to be included in leisure and recognize that, like Foucault, we experience privilege. Considering such privilege, we explore power and people connections, scrutinize ways power influences leisure, and examine methods to promote or resist power to increase leisure. Drawing on the analysis of power and leisure, we examine how discourse influences leisure and identify ways to facilitate inclusive leisure. We consider these aspects via Allen’s (1998) modalities of power-over, power-to, and power-with. Analyzing these modalities, we address barriers to leisure associated with power, strategies people use to engage in resistance through leisure, and ways inclusive leisure might occur. We conclude that each person can make positive contributions and offer inclusive leisure. Full article
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Article
Daily Time Use by Activity of Community-Dwelling Older Koreans: Focus on Health Management
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1688; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041688 - 10 Feb 2021
Viewed by 607
Abstract
This study aimed to examine the daily time use by activity and identified factors related to health management time (HMT) use among 195 older adults (mean age = 77.5, SD = 6.28 years; 70.8% women) attending a Korean senior center. Descriptive statistics were [...] Read more.
This study aimed to examine the daily time use by activity and identified factors related to health management time (HMT) use among 195 older adults (mean age = 77.5, SD = 6.28 years; 70.8% women) attending a Korean senior center. Descriptive statistics were analyzed and gamma regression analyses were performed. Participants used the most time on rest, followed by leisure, health management, daily living activities, and work. The mean duration of HMT was 205.38 min/day. The mean score for the subjective evaluation of health management (SEHM) was 13.62 and the importance score for SEHM was 4.72. Factors influencing HMT included exercise, number of chronic conditions, fasting blood sugar level, low density lipoprotein level, and cognitive function. HMT and frailty significantly predicted SEHM. HMT interventions focus on promoting exercise and acquiring health information to improve health outcomes among older adults in senior centers. Full article
Article
Time Management by Young People in Social Difficulties: Suggestions for Improving Their Life Trajectories
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9070; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239070 - 04 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 832
Abstract
This article covers the responses provided by professional practitioners in socio-educational intervention who are responsible for young people in social difficulties, in other words those facing personal and social issues that stop them from leading a normal life. It considers their suggestions for [...] Read more.
This article covers the responses provided by professional practitioners in socio-educational intervention who are responsible for young people in social difficulties, in other words those facing personal and social issues that stop them from leading a normal life. It considers their suggestions for helping young people to better their lives by becoming autonomous, as well as to manage and use their time in their transition to adulthood. A qualitative study was conducted that used an open, ad-hoc questionnaire administered to thirty participants (Madrid, Spain), in which the data analysis involved MAXQDA Analytics Pro 2020 software. The results identify suggestions at macrosocial level targeting the system, legal status, therapy, safety nets, education and the range and provision of social services. On another level, suggestions for improvement were identified in an immediate setting in which the young people interact with agencies, practitioners and counsellors. An initial level featured mostly statements of support for autonomy from the system and social services. The second level contained mainly suggestions for agencies, centres and social services. The conclusion is that there are implications at different levels of social ecology according to Bronfenbrenner’s model (1994). The practical suggestions for young people’s self-sufficiency in the use and management of their time should therefore be flexible, linked and cater for their more therapeutic needs through to their leisure time. Full article
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Article
Examining the Mediating Role of Motivation in the Relationship between Multidimensional Perfectionism and Well- and Ill-Being in Vocational Dancers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 4945; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144945 - 09 Jul 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1211
Abstract
Perfectionism is considered to be an important personality factor within the dance context given the high number of dancers whose psychological health is influenced by its consequences. The relationship between perfectionism and dancers’ well- and ill-being can be mediated by a range of [...] Read more.
Perfectionism is considered to be an important personality factor within the dance context given the high number of dancers whose psychological health is influenced by its consequences. The relationship between perfectionism and dancers’ well- and ill-being can be mediated by a range of variables. The present study explores the role of forms of motivation (i.e., autonomous motivation, controlled motivation and amotivation) as mediators in the relationship between perfectionism (i.e., self-oriented and socially prescribed) and an indicator of well-being (i.e., subjective vitality) and ill-being (i.e., burnout). Participants of the study were 146 male and female Spanish vocational dancers aged between 12 and 26 years old (Mean age = 15.40 ± 2.96) who completed questionnaires measuring the variables of interest. Results of multiple mediator regression analyses showed that amotivation mediated the relationships between self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism with burnout and subjective vitality. Self-oriented perfectionism was negatively correlated, and socially prescribed perfectionism positively associated with amotivation. Amotivation of dancers was a positive predictor of burnout and a negative predictor of subjective vitality. Overall, the findings corroborate the importance of amotivation in the relationship between perfectionism dimensions and well-being and ill-being in dancers. Full article
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Review

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Review
Imbalances in the Study of the Relationship between Leisure and Self-Esteem: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5555; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155555 - 31 Jul 2020
Viewed by 1001
Abstract
This systematic review offers a comprehensive examination of the relationship between leisure and self-esteem. The different perspectives were analyzed according to a framework that includes the different approaches for defining and measuring leisure, and a similar one was proposed for self-esteem. Articles indexed [...] Read more.
This systematic review offers a comprehensive examination of the relationship between leisure and self-esteem. The different perspectives were analyzed according to a framework that includes the different approaches for defining and measuring leisure, and a similar one was proposed for self-esteem. Articles indexed in the Web of Science (WoS) up to the end of 2018 were reviewed, specifically those that contained the keywords “leisure”, “self-esteem” or “self esteem” anywhere in the manuscript. Articles that did not present the qualitative or quantitative instruments needed to evaluate leisure or self-esteem were excluded. A total of 49 articles included the final quantitative synthesis. The overall findings showed that the prevailing methodology was objective (external). As regards content, the following combinations predominated: the behavioral approach to leisure with the unidimensional approach to self-esteem and the experiential approach to leisure with the unidimensional approach to self-esteem. Less studies were observed with the combination of mixed approaches and more comprehensive analyses: the behavioral-experiential combined with the multidimensional. To conclude, this study shows there is a demand for further empirical studies that explore the relationships between leisure and self-esteem. It also identified which approaches are most desirable to expand our understanding of the relationships between leisure and self-esteem. Full article
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