Special Issue "Oceans and Human Health: The Importance of Marine Ecosystems on Human Health and Wellbeing"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Josep Lloret
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Chair Oceans and Human Health, Institute of Aquatic Ecology, University of Girona, C/ Maria Aurèlia Capmany 69, 17003 Girona, Catalonia, Spain
Interests: oceans and human health; seafood security and safety; marine recreational activities and health; conservation of healthy marine ecosystems
Dr. Bruce Maycock
Website
Guest Editor
Secretary General of the Asia Pacific Academic Consortium of Public Health, APACPH KL Secretariat Office, Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, 50603 University of Malaya, Malaysia
Interests: oceans and human health; public health; health promotion; nutrition; marine food security; marine recreational activities and health; conservation of healthy marine ecosystems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Oceans and Human Health (OHH) topic addresses different aspects that have often been treated independently but in reality are closely related, such as the conservation of marine ecosystems, the promotion of health, and the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. The aim of this Special Issue is to attract papers about the relationship between marine ecosystems and human health and wellbeing. We encourage original research submissions and systematic reviews focusing on the relationship between marine ecosystems’ goods and services and public health. We welcome studies that examine (a) the benefits (e.g., omega 3 fatty acids, proteins) and risks (e.g., parasites, contaminants, biotoxins) of seafood consumption on people’s health (cardiovascular risk, cancer, allergies, mental health, etc.) and (b) the benefits of maritime and costal recreational activities such as swimming, scuba diving, sailing, etc. on the health and wellbeing of people (healthy or suffering any pathology). Studies incorporating different disciplines (marine and fisheries biology and ecology, medicine, epidemiology, veterinary, marine policy, and social sciences) that link directly to the OHH topic are welcome. We particularly encourage those studies that consider the relevance of the marine ecosystem’s preservation (e.g., through marine protected areas and other management tools) to human health, food security and wellbeing and the sustainability development goals.

Dr. Josep Lloret
Dr. Bruce Maycock
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oceans and human health
  • risks and benefits
  • seafood consumption
  • maritime recreational activities
  • mental and physical health
  • wellbeing
  • blue spaces
  • blue health
  • overfishing, plastic pollution

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Roses Ocean and Human Health Chair: A New Way to Engage the Public in Oceans and Human Health Challenges
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5078; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145078 - 14 Jul 2020
Abstract
Involving and engaging stakeholders is crucial for studying and managing the complex interactions between marine ecosystems and human health and wellbeing. The Oceans and Human Health Chair was founded in the town of Roses (Catalonia, Spain, NW Mediterranean) in 2018, the fruit of [...] Read more.
Involving and engaging stakeholders is crucial for studying and managing the complex interactions between marine ecosystems and human health and wellbeing. The Oceans and Human Health Chair was founded in the town of Roses (Catalonia, Spain, NW Mediterranean) in 2018, the fruit of a regional partnership between various stakeholders, and for the purpose of leading the way to better health and wellbeing through ocean research and conservation. The Chair is located in an area of the Mediterranean with a notable fishing, tourist, and seafaring tradition and is close to a marine reserve, providing the opportunity to observe diverse environmental conditions and coastal and maritime activities. The Chair is a case study demonstrating that local, collaborative, transdisciplinary, trans-sector, and bottom-up approaches offer tremendous opportunities for engaging coastal communities to help support long-lasting solutions that benefit everyone, and especially those living by the sea or making their living from the goods and services provided by the sea. Furthermore, the Chair has successfully integrated most of its experts in oceans and human health from the most prestigious institutions in Catalonia. The Chair focuses on three main topics identified by local stakeholders: Fish and Health; Leisure, Health, and Wellbeing; and Medicines from the Sea. Led by stakeholder engagement, the Chair can serve as a novel approach within the oceans and human health field of study to tackle a variety of environmental and public health challenges related to both communicable and non-communicable diseases, within the context of sociocultural issues. Drawing on the example provided by the Chair, four principles are established to encourage improved participatory processes in the oceans and human health field: bottom-up, “think local”, transdisciplinary and trans-sectorial, and “balance the many voices”. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Ocean Acidification and Human Health
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4563; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124563 - 24 Jun 2020
Abstract
The ocean provides resources key to human health and well-being, including food, oxygen, livelihoods, blue spaces, and medicines. The global threat to these resources posed by accelerating ocean acidification is becoming increasingly evident as the world’s oceans absorb carbon dioxide emissions. While ocean [...] Read more.
The ocean provides resources key to human health and well-being, including food, oxygen, livelihoods, blue spaces, and medicines. The global threat to these resources posed by accelerating ocean acidification is becoming increasingly evident as the world’s oceans absorb carbon dioxide emissions. While ocean acidification was initially perceived as a threat only to the marine realm, here we argue that it is also an emerging human health issue. Specifically, we explore how ocean acidification affects the quantity and quality of resources key to human health and well-being in the context of: (1) malnutrition and poisoning, (2) respiratory issues, (3) mental health impacts, and (4) development of medical resources. We explore mitigation and adaptation management strategies that can be implemented to strengthen the capacity of acidifying oceans to continue providing human health benefits. Importantly, we emphasize that the cost of such actions will be dependent upon the socioeconomic context; specifically, costs will likely be greater for socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, exacerbating the current inequitable distribution of environmental and human health challenges. Given the scale of ocean acidification impacts on human health and well-being, recognizing and researching these complexities may allow the adaptation of management such that not only are the harms to human health reduced but the benefits enhanced. Full article
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