ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

New Developments and Challenges in Chemical Risk Assessment for Occupational and Environmental Hygiene

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 4245

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Science and High Technology, University of Insubria, 21100 Como, Italy
Interests: occupational hygiene; environmental hygiene; exposure assessment; risk assessment; risk management; air pollution; exposure modeling; indoor air quality; nanosafety; chemical risk assessment; miniaturized sensors; exposure science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Science and High Technology, University of Insubria, 22100 Como, Italy
Interests: occupational hygiene; environmental hygiene; exposure assessment; risk assessment; risk management; air pollution; exposure modeling; indoor air quality; nanosafety; chemical risk assessment; miniaturized sensors; exposure science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Science and High Technology, University of Insubria, 22100 Como, Italy
Interests: occupational hygiene; indoor air quality; exposure assessment; aerosols; risk assessment; risk management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Science and High Technology, University of Insubria, 22100 Como, Italy
Interests: occupational hygiene; environmental hygiene; exposure assessment; risk assessment; risk management; air pollution; exposure modeling; indoor air quality; nanosafety; chemical risk assessment; miniaturized sensors; exposure science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, enormous changes have occurred in the environment, in daily life, and also in the world of work. The protection of the population and workers’ health must also evolve over time, as new knowledge and technological/methodological innovations are required to properly address the problems related to the assessment and management of risk for human health.

With a particular focus on chemical risk but extended to a wide range of occupational and environmental settings and exposure types, this Special Issue aims to collect scientific contributions useful for exploring research and practice in the field of risk assessment and management applied to environmental and occupational hygiene.

This Special Issue aims to collect original research articles concerning a broad spectrum of topics, which includes, but is not limited to:

  • Methodological and technological innovations and challenges for exposure science and exposure data production and analytics, also including the use of advanced sensor technologies (e.g., low-cost, miniaturized, wearable, placeable, implantable sensors), the use of new environmental and biological monitoring methods, the sampling and analysis of chemicals, and the use of new data analysis techniques (e.g., machine learning, big data).
  • Modeling techniques for exposure assessment, with a particular focus on model performance assessment studies, methodological innovations in modeling approaches, the application of new techniques (e.g., machine learning, big data) to modeling, and proposals for overcoming knowledge gaps such as the modeling of aggregate exposure assessment, exposure to mixtures or to objects and solid materials.
  • The study of non-conventional exposure scenarios (e.g., in-vehicle exposure and urban and/or traffic environments), or exposure scenarios in specific conditions (e.g., smart working) and in non-industrial living and working environments (e.g., indoor air quality in offices, schools, residences, and public buildings).
  • Emerging chemical risk factors in living and working environments (e.g., engineered nanomaterials and chemicals recently classified as hazardous, including recently classified carcinogenic, mutagenic, and reprotoxic substances).
  • Regulations and policies regarding chemical risk in living and working environments, with particular focus on the practical repercussions and challenges for risk assessment and management in living and working environments.
  • The application of risk management techniques, with a particular focus on safe-by-design or prevention-through-design approaches, techniques for reducing exposure to chemical agents, and the study of the adequacy of risk management measures and personal protective equipment.

Dr. Andrea Spinazzè
Dr. Francesca Borghi
Dr. Andrea Cattaneo
Prof. Dr. Domenico M. Cavallo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • exposure science
  • advanced sensor technologies
  • exposure modeling
  • exposure assessment
  • environmental monitoring
  • biological monitoring
  • hazardous chemicals
  • occupational exposure
  • big-data
  • machine-learning

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

14 pages, 801 KiB  
Article
How Valuable Are Small Measurement Datasets in Supplementing Occupational Exposure Models? A Numerical Study Using the Advanced Reach Tool
by Kevin McNally
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(7), 5386; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20075386 - 04 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1329
Abstract
The Advanced REACH Tool (ART) is the most detailed exposure model currently available for estimating inhalation exposures to dusts, vapours, and aerosols under a broad range of exposure scenarios. The ART follows a Bayesian approach, making use of a calibrated source–receptor model to [...] Read more.
The Advanced REACH Tool (ART) is the most detailed exposure model currently available for estimating inhalation exposures to dusts, vapours, and aerosols under a broad range of exposure scenarios. The ART follows a Bayesian approach, making use of a calibrated source–receptor model to provide central estimates of exposures and information on exposure variability from meta-analyses in the literature. Uniquely amongst exposure models, the ART provides a facility to update the baseline estimates from the mechanistic model and variance components using measurement data collected on the exposure scenario; however, in practical use, this facility is little used. In this paper, the full capability of the ART tool is demonstrated using a small number of carefully chosen case studies that each had a sufficient breadth of personal exposure measurement data to support a measurement-led exposure assessment. In total, six cases studies are documented, three where the estimate from the source–receptor model of the ART was consistent with measurement data, and a further three case studies where the source–receptor model of the ART was inconsistent with measurement data, resulting in a prior-data conflict. A simulation study was designed that involved drawing subsets of between two and ten measurements from the available measurement dataset, with estimates of the geometric mean (GM) and 90th percentile of exposures from the posterior distribution of ART compared against measurement-based estimates of these summaries. Results from this work indicate that very substantial reductions in the uncertainty associated with estimates of the GM and 90th percentile could be achieved with as few as two measurements, with results in detail sensitive to both the measurements themselves and worker and company labels associated with the measurements. For case studies involving prior-data conflicts, the estimates of the GM and 90th percentile rapidly changed as measurement data were used to update the prior. However, results suggest that the current statistical model of the ART does not allow a complete resolution of a prior-data conflict. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

18 pages, 903 KiB  
Protocol
Exposure to Disinfectants and Cleaning Products and Respiratory Health of Workers and Children in Daycares: The CRESPI Cohort Protocol
by Nicole Le Moual, Orianne Dumas, Pierre Bonnet, Anastasie Eworo Nchama, Barbara Le Bot, Etienne Sévin, Isabelle Pin, Valérie Siroux, Corinne Mandin and The CRESPI Study Group
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(10), 5903; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20105903 - 21 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2342
Abstract
Although cleaning tasks are frequently performed in daycare, no study has focused on exposures in daycares in relation to respiratory health. The CRESPI cohort is an epidemiological study among workers (n~320) and children (n~540) attending daycares. The purpose is to examine the impact [...] Read more.
Although cleaning tasks are frequently performed in daycare, no study has focused on exposures in daycares in relation to respiratory health. The CRESPI cohort is an epidemiological study among workers (n~320) and children (n~540) attending daycares. The purpose is to examine the impact of daycare exposures to disinfectants and cleaning products (DCP) on the respiratory health of workers and children. A sample of 108 randomly selected daycares in the region of Paris has been visited to collect settled dust to analyze semi-volatile organic compounds and microbiota, as well as sample indoor air to analyze aldehydes and volatile organic compounds. Innovative tools (smartphone applications) are used to scan DCP barcodes in daycare and inform their use; a database then matches the barcodes with the products’ compositions. At baseline, workers/parents completed a standardized questionnaire, collecting information on DCP used at home, respiratory health, and potential confounders. Follow-up regarding children’s respiratory health (monthly report through a smartphone application and biannual questionnaires) is ongoing until the end of 2023. Associations between DCP exposures and the respiratory health of workers/children will be evaluated. By identifying specific environments or DCP substances associated with the adverse respiratory health of workers and children, this longitudinal study will contribute to the improvement of preventive measures. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop