Special Issue "Research on Lifestyle, Nutrition, Consumer Behavior and Family Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Krystyna Gutkowska
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Market and Consumer Research, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (SGGW-WULS), 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: consumer research; consumer survey; food science; market; purchase decisions; tourism; family; lifestyle
Prof. Dr. Dominika Głąbska
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dietetics, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (SGGW-WULS), 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: diet; nutrition; human health; diet-related diseases; diet therapy; dietary prevention; lifestyle
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Dominika Guzek
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Market and Consumer Research, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (SGGW-WULS), 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: consumer attitude; consumer behavior; food choice; food neophobia; human health; food technology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health entitled “Research on Lifestyle, Nutrition, Consumer Behavior, and Family Health”.

A family is considered as the basic unit of health production at the individual and societal level, a context in public health practice, and an essential part of public health policy, research, and teaching. At the same time, family health represents a broad area of health development, including all family members across time and settings.

Recent studies have indicated a growing list of determinants of health, as they are associated with education, employment, income, family, living environment, nutrition, as well as other social determinants, such as early life, stress, social exclusion, social support, addiction, health system, gender, culture and social norms, media, stigma, and discrimination. Within the important determinants of health, there are purchase decisions and consumer behaviors, defined by the American Marketing Association as the dynamic interaction of affect and cognition, behavior, and the environment by which human beings conduct the exchange aspects of their lives.

In the last few months, as the world has been experiencing the COVID-19 global pandemic, we have observed the dynamic changes of individual and global priorities. These reflect the interests and concerns of populations toward possibilities to influence one’s health by including positive changes in their lifestyle, nutrition, and consumer behaviors.

In this Special Issue of IJERPH, we would like to give readers valuable insights into associations between lifestyle, nutrition, consumer behavior, and family health. The Guest Editors would like to invite original research and reviews (systematic reviews and meta-analyses) on the following topics:

  • Physical, mental, or social family health outcomes in various population groups;
  • Determinants of health in the 21st century and in the period of the global COVID-19 pandemic;
  • Influence of family and living environment on lifestyle and physical activity;
  • Lifestyle strategies to promote family health from childhood to elderly age;
  • Dietary patterns and nutritional behaviors in diet-related disease prevention and treatment;
  • Consumer attitudes, purchase decisions, and food choices for prevention and treatment of diet-related diseases;
  • Associations between environmental factors and resultant dietary health benefits and risks;
  • Marketing strategies and food policy for public health purposes.

Other topics within the “Research on Lifestyle, Nutrition, Consumer Behavior, and Family Health” are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Krystyna Gutkowska
Prof. Dr. Dominika Głąbska
Prof. Dr. Dominika Guzek
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lifestyle
  • physical activity
  • nutrition
  • food
  • intake
  • consumer
  • family
  • household
  • health
  • COVID-19

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Does Oral Hypofunction Promote Social Withdrawal in the Older Adults? A Longitudinal Survey of Elderly Subjects in Rural Japan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8904; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238904 - 30 Nov 2020
Abstract
It is often assumed that oral hypofunction is associated with social withdrawal in older adults because decreased motor function is related to decreased oral function. However, few studies have examined the relationship between social withdrawal in older adults and oral function. This longitudinal [...] Read more.
It is often assumed that oral hypofunction is associated with social withdrawal in older adults because decreased motor function is related to decreased oral function. However, few studies have examined the relationship between social withdrawal in older adults and oral function. This longitudinal study aimed to clarify the relationship between changes in the level of social withdrawal and oral function in independent older adults. Participants were 427 older adults aged 65 years or older who took part in a self-administered questionnaire from 2016 to 2017 (baseline), and again two years later (follow-up). At baseline, 17 items related to oral function and confounding factors related to withdrawal, physical condition, physical function, and cognitive function were evaluated. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to examine the oral functions that negatively impact social withdrawal. The following factors were significantly associated with the worsening of social withdrawal: the number of remaining teeth, gingival condition, occlusal force, masticatory efficiency, and items related to swallowing and dry mouth. Older adults with cognitive issues who walk slowly and have a weak knee extension muscle were also significantly more likely to have oral frailty. Those who were found to have oral frailty at baseline were 1.8 times more likely to develop withdrawal compared to those with robust oral function. The results indicated that the worsening of withdrawal was associated with oral hypofunction at baseline. Since oral hypofunction was associated with the worsening of social withdrawal in older adults, it is important to maintain older adults’ oral function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Lifestyle, Nutrition, Consumer Behavior and Family Health)
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