Special Issue "Health in EIA/SEA"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Gabriel Gulis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit for Health Promotion Research, University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs Vej 9-10, DK-6700 Esbjerg, Denmark
Interests: health impact assessment; health in EIA/SEA; global health; public health systems; health promotion
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The response to social, environmental, and economic determinants of health requires multisectoral approaches. Multisectoral action is central to the SDG agenda because of the range of determinants acting upon people’s health, such as environmental and social determinants of health, socioeconomic status, gender, and others. One of the disciplines supporting multisectoral action is the enhanced assessment of health impacts in environmental assessments, such as environmental impact assessments (EIA) and strategic environmental assessment (SEA).

In 2014, the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Directive within the European Union (2011/92/EU) was amended. The amended directive (2014/52/EU) explicitly includes “population and human health” in the list of topics to be considered in an EIA. This amendment opened new opportunities for health impact assessment (HIA) and for closer collaboration of health and environmental impact assessment experts. Sound published evidence of importance of such collaboration and, to some extent, a merger of assessments already exists, mostly from Australia and New Zealand.

To operationalize the close collaboration and full inclusion of health into Environmental Impact Assessment, resources and capacities are needed. Case studies, both successful and unsuccessful, guidelines, training courses, and working tools need to pre-developed and presented if still missing. Research, mostly done in academia, shall connect to practice with the aim to raise the quality of impact assessment to provide as verified as possible prediction of future impacts. Quality assurance tools should also be developed and applied, following the UK and Wales examples.

This Special Volume of the Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is seeking high-quality contributions on all areas of inclusion of health into EIA/SEA, on HIA and all the issues mentioned above. We welcome contributions from all around the world, including critical reviews of failed cases of inclusion of health into EIA/SEA. We invite contributors from academia, impact assessment practice, policy, and the education arena.

Dr. Gabriel Gulis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health
  • health impact assessment
  • environmental impact assessment
  • impact assessment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Using Mosses as Bioindicators of Potentially Toxic Element Contamination in Ecologically Valuable Areas Located in the Vicinity of a Road: A Case Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3963; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203963 (registering DOI) - 17 Oct 2019
Abstract
This study analyzed the impact of road transportation on the concentration of Zn, Ni, Pb, Co, and Cd in moss (Pleurozium schreberi). The study was carried out over five years near a national road running from the north to the east [...] Read more.
This study analyzed the impact of road transportation on the concentration of Zn, Ni, Pb, Co, and Cd in moss (Pleurozium schreberi). The study was carried out over five years near a national road running from the north to the east (Poland) in the area of Natura 2000 sites. Samples were collected at three significantly different locations: (1) near a sharp bend, (2) near a straight section of the road in a woodless area, and (3) in a slightly wooded area. At each location, moss samples were collected from sites situated 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 m from the road edge. The highest Zn and Cd contents in the moss were recorded 6 m from the road edge near a sharp bend (where vehicles brake sharply and accelerate suddenly). At the same location, at a distance of 2 m, the highest Pb concentration was noted, and at a distance of 4 m from the road, the highest Ni concentration was noted. The Co concentration in the moss was the highest near the woodless straight section at a distance of 2 and 12 m from the road. The concentrations of Zn, Pb, Ni, Co (only at the woodless location), and Cd (at all locations) were significantly and negatively correlated with distance from the road. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health in EIA/SEA)
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Open AccessArticle
Distribution, Ecological Risk Assessment, and Bioavailability of Cadmium in Soil from Nansha, Pearl River Delta, China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3637; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193637 - 27 Sep 2019
Abstract
Background: Cadmium (Cd) pollution poses a threat to human health. Examination of the spatial distribution of Cd in soils can be used to assess the risks posed to humans and the environment. Objective: This study determined the enrichment rules and factors influencing Cd [...] Read more.
Background: Cadmium (Cd) pollution poses a threat to human health. Examination of the spatial distribution of Cd in soils can be used to assess the risks posed to humans and the environment. Objective: This study determined the enrichment rules and factors influencing Cd pollution in Nansha, and evaluated the pollution characteristics and bioavailability of Cd in quaternary sediments through 7 deep soil profiles (0–200 cm), 4 boreholes, and 348 topsoil (0–20 cm) samples. Methods: The geo-accumulation index (Igeo) and the potential ecological risk index (Er) were used to assess ecological risk, and bioavailability was determined using multivariate, spatial distribution, and correlation matrix analyses. Results: From the Er, 52% of Nansha was classed as being at very high risk of Cd pollution; a further 36% was classed as dangerous. Cadmium was more abundant in clay soils than in sandy soils. Bioavailable Cd in quaternary sediments was significantly affected by the total Cd, and labile Cd accounted for more than half of the total Cd. Changes in pH mainly affected bioavailable Cd rather than total Cd, affecting the overall bioavailability of Cd. Conclusions: Nansha soils are commonly and seriously contaminated with Cd. An appropriate remediation treatment approach should be used to reduce Cd bioavailability. Furthermore, planting structures in farmland should be adjusted to avoid the impact of heavy metals on human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health in EIA/SEA)
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Open AccessArticle
Eight Elements in Soils from a Typical Light Industrial City, China: Spatial Distribution, Ecological Assessment, and the Source Apportionment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2591; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16142591 - 20 Jul 2019
Abstract
Contamination with the eight elements, Hg, As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Cd, is a serious concern in Zhongshan, which is a typical light industrial city, China. 60 surface soil samples were collected to investigate the concentrations, spatial distribution, human health risk, [...] Read more.
Contamination with the eight elements, Hg, As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Cd, is a serious concern in Zhongshan, which is a typical light industrial city, China. 60 surface soil samples were collected to investigate the concentrations, spatial distribution, human health risk, and sources of these elements in the soils in Zhongshan. The concentrations of the eight elements were analyzed while using ordinary kriging analysis, pollution load index (PLI), potential ecological risk index (RI), human health risk, correlation analysis, and factor analysis. The mean concentrations of the tested elements, excluding Pb and As, were higher than the soil background values in the Pearl River Delta. The spatial distribution of the tested elements revealed a zonal distribution pattern and high values in several areas. The mean PLI and RI indicated slight and moderate risk levels. Health risk assessment demonstrates that both children and adults were more exposed to Cu than to Cr, As, and Cd. However, the associated carcinogenic risk is acceptable. Hg that originated from human activities; As, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Cd originated from industrial activities; and, Pb and Zn originated from transportation activities. Cd was the main pollutant in the study area and it was present at higher concentrations when compared with those of the other elements. Therefore, Zhongshan should encourage enterprises to conduct industrial transformation to control the ecological risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health in EIA/SEA)
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