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Special Issue "Greenhouse and Horticulture"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Diego Luis Valera Martinez

Universidad de Almeria, Res Ctr CIAIMBITAL, Ctra De Sacramento S-N, E-04120 Almeria, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: greenhouse; horticulture; insect pest management; food safety; public health; water

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of the Editorial Team of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, we would like to invite you to submit your article for the upcoming Special Issue ‘Greenhouse Horticulture’.

Greenhouse technology has evolved from being a niche cultivation system for specialty crops to becoming the backbone of intensive agriculture both in developed economies and in new emerging markets.

From a consumer point of view, greenhouse technology has provided a wide availability of high-quality fresh produce all year round at affordable prices, a factor that has undoubtedly changed the market dynamics in a permanent manner.

From a technological point of view, the reasons for the rapid expansion of greenhouse technology and, in particular, of greenhouse horticulture are manifold but one main factor arises above all other considerations. Indeed, the possibility to control the microclimate inside the greenhouse independently of outside environmental conditions has made it possible to cultivate a wide range of high-demand crops in latitudes where, due to their harsh cold or warm environmental conditions, horticulture would otherwise be limited to seasonal, lower-productivity crops.

This delicate balance between the microclimate inside the greenhouse and external environmental conditions has not come without a cost. Indeed, the expansion of greenhouse agriculture has resulted in a number of scientific challenges in a plethora of scientific fields. This, in turn, requires new multidisciplinary scientific and technological solutions in the fields of insect pest management, food safety and public health, water and underground water quality, climate control and energy engineering, plant breeding, soil science, and agricultural economics, to name only a few of the most pressing challenges in this highly dynamic and emerging scientific domain.

We kindly invite you to submit your contributions to this Special Issue. The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed, open-access journal that covers applied, state-of-the-art topics in the fields of environmental sciences and engineering, public and environmental health, and related scientific fields, and is characterized by its rapid publication policy and its high visibility, as it is indexed by the Science Citation Index Expanded (Web of Science), the Social Sciences Citation Index, MEDLINE (PubMed), Scopus (Elsevier), among other indexes. 

We sincerely hope that this invitation will spark your interest in publishing your latest contributions for this Special Issue dedicated to this highly topical, emerging scientific field.

Sincerely,

Prof. Dr. Diego Luis Valera Martinez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Greenhouse
  • Horticulture
  • Insect pest management
  • Food safety
  • Public health
  • Water
  • Climate control
  • Energy
  • Plant breeding
  • Soil science
  • Agricultural economics

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Plant Growth Promotion and Biocontrol of Pythium ultimum by Saline Tolerant Trichoderma Isolates under Salinity Stress
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 2053; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16112053
Received: 15 May 2019 / Revised: 3 June 2019 / Accepted: 4 June 2019 / Published: 10 June 2019
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Abstract
This present study evaluates three isolates of Trichoderma as plant growth promoting or biological control agents: Trichoderma aggressivum f. sp. europaeum, Trichoderma saturnisporum, and the marine isolate obtained from Posidonia oceanica, Trichoderma longibrachiatum. The purpose is to contribute to [...] Read more.
This present study evaluates three isolates of Trichoderma as plant growth promoting or biological control agents: Trichoderma aggressivum f. sp. europaeum, Trichoderma saturnisporum, and the marine isolate obtained from Posidonia oceanica, Trichoderma longibrachiatum. The purpose is to contribute to an overall reduction in pesticide residues in the fruit and the environment and to a decrease in chemical fertilizers, the excess of which aggravates one of the most serious abiotic stresses, salinity. The tolerance of the different isolates to increasing concentrations of sodium chloride was evaluated in vitro, as well as their antagonistic capacity against Pythium ultimum. The plant growth promoting capacity and effects of Trichoderma strains on the severity of P. ultimum on melon seedlings under saline conditions were also analysed. The results reveal that the three isolates of Trichoderma, regardless of their origin, alleviate the stress produced by salinity, resulting in larger plants with an air-dry weight percentage above 80% in saline stress conditions for T. longibrachiatum, or an increase in root-dry weight close to 50% when T. aggressivum f. sp. europaeum was applied. Likewise, the three isolates showed antagonistic activity against P. ultimum, reducing the incidence of the disease, with the highest response found for T. longibrachiatum. Biological control of P. ultimum by T. aggressivum f. sp. europaeum and T. saturnisporum is reported for the first time, reducing disease severity by 62.96% and 51.85%, respectively. This is the first description of T. aggressivum f. sp. europaeum as a biological control agent and growth promoter. The application of these isolates can be of enormous benefit to horticultural crops, in both seedbeds and greenhouses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Greenhouse and Horticulture)
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Global Research on Malaria and Plasmodium vivax
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 1928; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16111928
Received: 2 May 2019 / Revised: 26 May 2019 / Accepted: 28 May 2019 / Published: 31 May 2019
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Abstract
Background: Malaria is one of the infectious diseases of greatest interest to the scientific community and of greatest concern to international health authorities. Traditionally, the focus has been on Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes the most severe form of the [...] Read more.
Background: Malaria is one of the infectious diseases of greatest interest to the scientific community and of greatest concern to international health authorities. Traditionally, the focus has been on Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes the most severe form of the disease in Africa. However, in the last twenty years, the Plasmodium vivax parasite, responsible for a large number of cases in Latin America, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, the Horn of Africa, and Oceania, has also generated enormous interest due, among other things, to the published evidence that it can cause severe malaria. Methods: In this paper, the international scientific publication on malaria and P. vivax has been analyzed using the Scopus database to try to define global trends in this field of study. Results: It has been shown that events such as the emergence of resistance to certain drugs can break a trend. The important role of non-malaria-endemic countries such as the USA or Switzerland in malaria research is also evident. Conclusions: International cooperation will be essential for the eradication of the disease. Moreover, in this sense, the general vision given by the bibliometric analysis of malaria caused by P. vivax is fundamental to paint the picture regarding the current situation and encourage international cooperation and control efforts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Greenhouse and Horticulture)
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Open AccessArticle
The Production and Quality of Different Varieties of Papaya Grown under Greenhouse in Short Cycle in Continental Europe
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1789; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101789
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 16 May 2019 / Accepted: 16 May 2019 / Published: 20 May 2019
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Abstract
In Europe, papaya consumption is growing due to its nutritional properties. The proximity of consumer markets to Southeast Spain allows fruits to be harvested at a more advanced stage of maturity compared to exporting countries from outside Europe, a timeline which improves the [...] Read more.
In Europe, papaya consumption is growing due to its nutritional properties. The proximity of consumer markets to Southeast Spain allows fruits to be harvested at a more advanced stage of maturity compared to exporting countries from outside Europe, a timeline which improves the quality of the papaya. Experiments have been carried out to assess the adaptation of papaya to protected cropping systems (under greenhouse) in the region. In this paper, we showed the results obtained in an experiment with five varieties, taking the most cultivated variety as control, which was grafted on its own female rootstock, in addition to another four new varieties that were introduced. Transplanting was made with early sex-identified plants in the nursery. Cultivation was developed in a 446-day cycle, almost 15 months and fruits were always harvested from the soil, due to the height that the plant reached in that period. The best yield parameters and fruit characteristics were obtained from hermaphrodite Intenzza papaya grafted on female papaya rootstock, although there were also other varieties which gave results that made possible its cultivation under this production system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Greenhouse and Horticulture)
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Open AccessArticle
Path Loss Determination Using Linear and Cubic Regression Inside a Classic Tomato Greenhouse
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1744; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101744
Received: 21 March 2019 / Revised: 12 May 2019 / Accepted: 14 May 2019 / Published: 17 May 2019
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Abstract
The production of tomatoes in greenhouses, in addition to its relevance in nutrition and health, is an activity of the agroindustry with high economic importance in Spain, the first exporter in Europe of this vegetable. The technological updating with precision agriculture, implemented in [...] Read more.
The production of tomatoes in greenhouses, in addition to its relevance in nutrition and health, is an activity of the agroindustry with high economic importance in Spain, the first exporter in Europe of this vegetable. The technological updating with precision agriculture, implemented in order to ensure adequate production, leads to a deployment planning of wireless sensors with limited coverage by the attenuation of radio waves in the presence of vegetation. The well-known propagation models FSPL (Free-Space Path Loss), two-ray, COST235, Weissberger, ITU-R (International Telecommunications Union—Radiocommunication Sector), FITU-R (Fitted ITU-R), offer values with an error percentage higher than 30% in the 2.4 GHz band in relation to those measured in field tests. As a substantial improvement, we have developed optimized propagation models, with an error estimate of less than 9% in the worst-case scenario for the later benefit of farmers, consumers and the economic chain in the production of tomatoes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Greenhouse and Horticulture)
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of the Effect of Concentrations of Four Whitening Products in Cover Transmissivity of Mediterranean Greenhouses
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 958; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16060958
Received: 27 January 2019 / Revised: 14 March 2019 / Accepted: 15 March 2019 / Published: 18 March 2019
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Abstract
The present work analyses the traditional method of applying whitening products on Mediterranean greenhouses. Four commercial whitening products (agricultural solar protectors, ASPs), applied at four doses, were compared with a non-whitened cover. The traditional product “Blanco de España” with 99% calcium carbonate (CaCO [...] Read more.
The present work analyses the traditional method of applying whitening products on Mediterranean greenhouses. Four commercial whitening products (agricultural solar protectors, ASPs), applied at four doses, were compared with a non-whitened cover. The traditional product “Blanco de España” with 99% calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and other three products with 97% CaCO3 that incorporate adhesives were tested. The use of adhesives in ASP did not influence the effect of the different products on the inside temperature, and at the same dose all four products show a similar behaviour. The findings support the maximum dose recommended by other authors of 0.50 kg L−1 (50/100), above which the transmissivity of the greenhouse cover decreases by over 50%. The effect of ASP on the transmissivity of the cover depends principally on the dose applied, but also on the climatic conditions (solar radiation, cloud cover, etc.) and on the time of year (solar elevation). The habitual use of a constant dose throughout the year does not seem to be the most adequate. Recommended doses should vary according to the time of year and the desired degree of transmissivity reduction. The adhesive components are shown to provide a high degree of protection against heavy rain. The study recommends a standardised method of ASP application, establishing a method that allows the grower to verify the concentration of the product that will remain on the greenhouse cover. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Greenhouse and Horticulture)
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Open AccessArticle
Aquifer Sustainability and the Use of Desalinated Seawater for Greenhouse Irrigation in the Campo de Níjar, Southeast Spain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 898; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050898
Received: 11 February 2019 / Revised: 7 March 2019 / Accepted: 8 March 2019 / Published: 12 March 2019
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Abstract
In the Campo de Níjar (southeast Spain), an intensive horticulture model under plastic has been developed based on the use of groundwater. For many years, aquifers have been overexploited, almost generating an environmental collapse. The construction of a desalination plant was planned to [...] Read more.
In the Campo de Níjar (southeast Spain), an intensive horticulture model under plastic has been developed based on the use of groundwater. For many years, aquifers have been overexploited, almost generating an environmental collapse. The construction of a desalination plant was planned to improve this situation and to achieve sustainable aquifer management. However, the aquifer is still being overexploited, since farmers scarcely use desalinated seawater for irrigation. In this paper, farmers irrigating with desalinated seawater are characterized, since they contribute to aquifer sustainability. The study aimed to identify the variables which condition the use of this water resource, as well as the kinds of incentives that encourage this option. For this purpose, a survey was undertaken within a sample of 110 farmers. A cluster analysis and a binary logistic regression were employed. The results from the cluster analysis allowed the characterization of farmers who use desalinated seawater for irrigation. Furthermore, the regression model showed the variables that determine a more intensive use of this irrigation source, such as crop diversification, availability of different water resources and the conductivity of aquifer water available for irrigation. The incentives promoting the use of desalinated seawater for irrigation that most encourage farmers are the implementation of tax relief, price reductions and the obligation to install rainwater collection systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Greenhouse and Horticulture)
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Open AccessArticle
Greenhouse Soil Biosolarization with Tomato Plant Debris as a Unique Fertilizer for Tomato Crops
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(2), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16020279
Received: 10 November 2018 / Revised: 14 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 19 January 2019
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Abstract
Intensive greenhouse horticulture can cause various environmental problems. Among these, the management, storage, and processing of crop residues can provoke aquifer contamination, pest proliferation, bad odors, or the abuse of phytosanitary treatments. Biosolarization adds value to any fresh plant residue and is an [...] Read more.
Intensive greenhouse horticulture can cause various environmental problems. Among these, the management, storage, and processing of crop residues can provoke aquifer contamination, pest proliferation, bad odors, or the abuse of phytosanitary treatments. Biosolarization adds value to any fresh plant residue and is an efficient technique for the control of soil-borne diseases. This study aims to examine an alternative means of managing greenhouse crop residues through biosolarization and to investigate the influence of organic matter on yield and quality of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, L.) fruit. With this purpose, the following nutritional systems were evaluated: inorganic fertilization with and without brassica pellets (Fert, Fert +, and Fert ++), fresh tomato plant debris with and without brassica pellets (Rest, Rest +, and Rest ++), and no fertilizer application (Control). The addition of organic matter was equal across all the treatments except for the control with regard to yield and quality of the tomato fruit. In light of these results, the application of tomato plant debris to the soil through biosolarization is postulated as an alternative for the management of crop residues, solving an environmental problem and having a favorable impact on the production and quality of tomatoes as a commercial crop. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Greenhouse and Horticulture)
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