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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(2), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16020279

Greenhouse Soil Biosolarization with Tomato Plant Debris as a Unique Fertilizer for Tomato Crops

1
CIAIMBITAL, Campus de Excelencia Internacional Agroalimentario, Universidad de Almería, Carretera Sacramento s/n, 04120 Almería, Spain
2
IFAPA-La Mojonera, Camino San Nicolás n.1, 04745 La Mojonera, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 November 2018 / Revised: 14 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 19 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Greenhouse and Horticulture)
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Abstract

Intensive greenhouse horticulture can cause various environmental problems. Among these, the management, storage, and processing of crop residues can provoke aquifer contamination, pest proliferation, bad odors, or the abuse of phytosanitary treatments. Biosolarization adds value to any fresh plant residue and is an efficient technique for the control of soil-borne diseases. This study aims to examine an alternative means of managing greenhouse crop residues through biosolarization and to investigate the influence of organic matter on yield and quality of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, L.) fruit. With this purpose, the following nutritional systems were evaluated: inorganic fertilization with and without brassica pellets (Fert, Fert +, and Fert ++), fresh tomato plant debris with and without brassica pellets (Rest, Rest +, and Rest ++), and no fertilizer application (Control). The addition of organic matter was equal across all the treatments except for the control with regard to yield and quality of the tomato fruit. In light of these results, the application of tomato plant debris to the soil through biosolarization is postulated as an alternative for the management of crop residues, solving an environmental problem and having a favorable impact on the production and quality of tomatoes as a commercial crop. View Full-Text
Keywords: tomato; biofumigation; organic; inorganic fertilizer; sustainability; environment tomato; biofumigation; organic; inorganic fertilizer; sustainability; environment
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García-Raya, P.; Ruiz-Olmos, C.; Marín-Guirao, J.I.; Asensio-Grima, C.; Tello-Marquina, J.C.; de Cara-García, M. Greenhouse Soil Biosolarization with Tomato Plant Debris as a Unique Fertilizer for Tomato Crops. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 279.

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