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Editorial Board Members' Collection Series: Epidemiologic and Public Health Assessment from a Global Perspective

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Public Health Statistics and Risk Assessment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 4724

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Science, Michael and Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living​​,​ UTHealth | The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, Austin Campus, Austin​​,​ TX 78701, USA
Interests: lifestyle behaviors epidemiology; medicine/public health evidence based, nutritional status of population; cardiovascular epidemiology; diagnostic methods

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Guest Editor
Department of Translational Research, New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
Interests: epidemiology of infectious diseases; molecular epidemiology of pathogenic microorganisms; prevention of healthcare-associated infections; assessemnet and control of microbiological risks of water; assessment of occupational biological risk; health communication and implementation of communication tools
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce this Collection titled, “Editorial Board Members' Collection Series: Epidemiologic and Public Health Assessment from a Global Perspective”. This issue will be a collection of papers from researchers invited by the Editorial Board Members. The aim is to provide a venue for networking and communication between IJERPH and scholars in the field of epidemiologic and public health assessment. All papers will be fully open access upon publication after peer review.

Dr. Augusto César Ferreira De Moraes
Dr. Beatrice Casini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • measurement bias
  • epidemiologic methods
  • quantitative bias analysis
  • reliability and validity analysis
  • epidemiology of infectious diseases
  • lifestyle behaviors epidemiology
  • risk assessment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 638 KiB  
Article
Reliability and Validity Estimate of the Pro-Inflammatory/Anti-Inflammatory Food Intake Score in South American Pediatric Population: SAYCARE Study
by Lívia Gabriele Azevedo-Garcia, Francisco Leonardo Torres-Leal, Juan Carlos Aristizabal, Gabriela Berg, Heráclito B. Carvalho and Augusto César Ferreira De Moraes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1038; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021038 - 06 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1642
Abstract
Chronic low-grade inflammation may be associated with the development of chronic non-communicable diseases in young populations, often lasting to adulthood. Studies show that the diet is related to chronic inflammation. The Pro-inflammatory/Anti-inflammatory Food Intake Score (PAIFIS) is an indicator that measures the inflammatory [...] Read more.
Chronic low-grade inflammation may be associated with the development of chronic non-communicable diseases in young populations, often lasting to adulthood. Studies show that the diet is related to chronic inflammation. The Pro-inflammatory/Anti-inflammatory Food Intake Score (PAIFIS) is an indicator that measures the inflammatory potential of the diet, with the help of validated tools that assess food consumption. The validation of tools that assess inflammatory dietary patterns in young populations to produce valid and reliable results is essential to guide disease prevention strategies for adulthood. Methods: This study aimed to estimate the Pro-inflammatory/Anti-inflammatory Food Intake Score (PAIFIS) in children and adolescents in South America and to test its reliability and validity using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and an inflammatory biomarker. This work consists of a validation study in a sample of children and adolescents conducted in South America (SAYCARE Study). The habitual consumption of food contributing to calculating the PAIFIS was obtained through an FFQ and 24 h Dietary Recall (24HDR). Reliability was tested using the FFQ (FFQ1 × FFQ2), using Spearman’s correlation coefficient to estimate the agreement between measurements. The validity of the PAIFIS was tested using 24HDR and the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP) using Spearman’s correlation and multilevel linear regression. Results: For children and adolescents, pro- and anti-inflammatory food groups showed Spearman’s correlation coefficients ranging from 0.31 to 0.66, convergent validity ranging from 0.09 to 0.40, and criterion validity for a reliability range from −0.03 to 0.18. The PAIFIS showed Spearman’s correlation coefficients for reliability ranging from 0.61 to 0.69, convergent validity from 0.16 to 0.23, and criterion validity from −0.03 to 0.24. Conclusion: The PAIFIS showed acceptable reliability, weak convergent validity, and weak criterion validity in children and adolescents. Full article
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9 pages, 352 KiB  
Article
Psychometric Properties of the Online International Physical Activity Questionnaire in College Students
by Marcus Vinicius Nascimento-Ferreira, Ana Clara Arrais Rosa, Jacyara Cristina Azevedo, Armando Rodrigues de Alencar Santos, Keisyanne De Araujo-Moura and Kelber Abrão Ferreira
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 15380; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192215380 - 21 Nov 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1384
Abstract
Introduction: Due to the restrictions imposed to control the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an increase in studies based on online surveys. However, there are important concerns about the validity and generalizability of results from online surveys. Thus, we aimed to test the [...] Read more.
Introduction: Due to the restrictions imposed to control the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an increase in studies based on online surveys. However, there are important concerns about the validity and generalizability of results from online surveys. Thus, we aimed to test the reliability and validity of the online version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire short form (IPAQ-SF) among college students from low-income regions. Methods: This was a methodological feasibility study with a random stratified sample from a college located in the state of Maranhão in the city of Imperatriz (Brazil). The sample consisted of 195 college students (at least 17 years of age) to evaluate the validity and 117 students to evaluate the reliability. All data were collected in a self-reported online format (via Google Forms) twice, with an interval of 2 weeks. We used Spearman’s correlation analysis for the reliability study. Additionally, we applied exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate the structural validity. Results: The questionnaire showed acceptable (rho > 0.30) and significant (p < 0.05) reliability, except for the question about the duration of sitting time on a weekend day. When assessing the construct validity (exploratory analysis), we identified a single factor that explained 88.8% of the variance. The 1-factor model showed acceptable model fit (SRMR = 0.039; CFI = 0.96; TLI = 0.90) in confirmatory analysis. Conclusions: The online version of the IPAQ-SF has acceptable reliability among college students from low-income regions and maintains the structure of the construct regarding to physical activity. Full article
18 pages, 1631 KiB  
Article
Mediterranean Diet and Cardiovascular Prevention: Why Analytical Observational Designs Do Support Causality and Not Only Associations
by Miguel Ángel Martínez-González, Nerea Martín-Calvo, Telmo Bretos-Azcona, Silvia Carlos and Miguel Delgado-Rodríguez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(20), 13653; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192013653 - 21 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1349
Abstract
Causal reductions in cardiovascular disease (CVD) with the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) are supported by randomized trials, but the ability of nonrandomized studies to provide causal inferences in nutritional epidemiology is questioned. The “Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra” (SUN) project, conducted during 1999–2019 with 18,419 [...] Read more.
Causal reductions in cardiovascular disease (CVD) with the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) are supported by randomized trials, but the ability of nonrandomized studies to provide causal inferences in nutritional epidemiology is questioned. The “Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra” (SUN) project, conducted during 1999–2019 with 18,419 participants, was used to try to refute non-causal explanations for the inverse association found between adherence to the MedDiet and reduced CVD risk. A framework of different analytical strategies is proposed: alternative definitions of the exposure, exploration of residual confounding, resampling methods, depiction of absolute risks across the follow-up period, trial emulation, and negative controls. Additionally, we calculated the rate advancement period (RAP). We found that one standard deviation increase in the most frequently used MedDiet score was associated with a 29% relative reduction in CVD risk (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 14–41%), which is almost identical to that found in 2 randomized trials. The RAP of CVD would be postponed by an average of 7.9 years (95% CI: 1.6 to 14.2 years) by switching from low (MDS = 0 to2) to high (MDS = 7 to 9) adherence to the MedDiet in the fully adjusted model. Sensitivity analyses, graphical representations of absolute risks, trial emulation, and negative controls also supported causality. In conclusion, a framework of analytical approaches supported the causal effect of the MedDiet on CVD prevention using observational data. Similar methodology could be applied for causal inferences regarding other hypotheses. Full article
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