Special Issue "Climate Change Adaption for Public Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Hyun Kim
Website
Guest Editor
Division of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
Interests: disaster epidemiology; global health; climate change health impact; occupational and environmental epidemiology; injury epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Climate change is one of the most dire and rapidly growing threats to public health in the twenty-first century. Aside from the direct consequences we have already been experiencing, such as the growing frequency of extreme weather events and outbreaks of vector and water-borne diseases, the slow and indirect impacts that are gradually coming to the fore are also of great concern, particularly in the areas of mental health, chronic noncommunicable diseases, food security, population migration and displacement, and the consequent overburdening of health systems.

However, while the national governments that came together at Paris Agreement have identified human health as the top 6th priority sector to improve, in reality, only limited efforts have been allocated to the health sector. Specifically, 85% of 136 developing countries included health in their Nationally Determined Contributions, but only 0.5% of 1.5 billion USD of multilateral climate projects has been funded to the health sector. This is only one of the many examples demonstrating the sluggishness in mainstreaming and responding to this serious problem.  

In light of this collective challenge, one of the best ways to contribute for us as scholars and professionals in the field of public health would be to take the lead in identifying needs and gaps, assessing the best adaptation strategies from policy developments, and suggesting directions in engineering interventions. 

In this Special Issue, we would like to share the best public health adaptation strategies and technologies to minimize climate change impacts to public health. We highly encourage innovative ideas and insightful observations, such as policy analyses to identify current needs and gaps on climate change action plans, reviews of existing technologies that can be effectively converted to climate-resilient technologies, and introduction of new technologies in disaster preparedness, and in water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH), with particular interest in rainwater harvesting, ground water treatments, and dry toilets with flood-proofness.

Dr. Hyun Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate change adaptation for public health
  • Climate resilience
  • Climate resilient technologies
  • Policy development and implementation
  • Engineering interventions
  • Evaluation and monitoring
  • Health impact assessment
  • Vulnerability and adaptation assessment

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
The Outrage Effect of Personal Stake, Familiarity, Effects on Children, and Fairness on Climate Change Risk Perception Moderated by Political Orientation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6722; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186722 - 15 Sep 2020
Abstract
Outrage factors are perceived characteristics of risk that provoke emotional responses and influence risk perception. Although several studies examined how multiple influences affect climate change risk perception, outrage factors have not been comprehensively assessed in the context of climate change risk perception. Using [...] Read more.
Outrage factors are perceived characteristics of risk that provoke emotional responses and influence risk perception. Although several studies examined how multiple influences affect climate change risk perception, outrage factors have not been comprehensively assessed in the context of climate change risk perception. Using an online survey in South Korea (n = 592), we investigated outrage factors associated with climate change risk perception and whether political orientation moderates these outrage effects. We considered 11 of 20 outrage factors: voluntariness, controllability, familiarity, fairness, uncertainty, delayed effects, effects on children, trust, reversibility, personal stake, and human vs. natural origin. Factors that overlapped with the selected outrage factors or those that were not relevant to climate change were excluded. The survey revealed that the climate change risk perception of an individual increased when they perceived climate change to be relevant to their personal lives, when they felt unfamiliar with climate change, when they thought climate change would have a severe impact on children, or when they thought climate change would have unequal consequences. Moreover, respondents who identified as political conservatives were subject to a greater outrage effect of personal stake for climate change. The implications of the outrage effect on climate change risk perception and the greater vulnerability of conservatives to outrage effect are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Adaption for Public Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: The Outrage Effect of Personal Stake, Familiarity, Effects on Children, and Fairness on Climate Change Risk Perception Moderated by Political Orientation
Authors: Youngkee Ju; et al.
Affiliation: School of Communication, Hallym University, Chunchon, South Korea
Back to TopTop