Special Issue "Immersing in an Enriched Environment: Aquatic Therapy in a Modern Perspective"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Javier Güeita Rodríguez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Physical therapy, occupational therapy, rehabilitation and physical medicine Department, Rey Juan Carlos University (URJC), Madrid, Spain
Interests: aquatic therapy; functioning; disability and rehabilitation
Prof. Dr. Antonio Ignacio Cuesta Vargas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Physical Therapy Department. Málaga University (UMA) Málaga, Spain
Interests: aquatic therapy; exercise; psychometrics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of water and its application in aquatic therapy has streamed since the development of the evidence-based practice model. Aquatic therapy provides an enriched environment in which children, adults, and the elderly can participate, with improvements in functioning and quality of life in a wide range of disability conditions. Therapeutic aquatic exercise programs can provide a fun and motivating form of physical activity, supporting the physical, social, and emotional wellbeing of patients. Aquatic therapy has grown enormously today; however, there has been an emphasis on the further research and implementation of aquatic therapy in health care sciences.

This Special Issue welcomes original studies that consider and apply aquatic therapy on health care science. All disability conditions can be addressed. We welcome studies that have the potential to change clinical care settings and health policy.

This Special Issue will provide readers with the state-of-the-art theory and practical information on health research perspectives that determine the uptake of aquatic therapy in the health care science and services.

Prof. Dr. Javier Güeita Rodríguez
Prof. Dr. Antonio Ignacio Cuesta Vargas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • enriched environment
  • aquatic therapy
  • health care
  • health services
  • disability and rehabilitation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Investigation the EMG Activities of Lower Limb Muscles When Doing Squatting Exercise in Water and on Land
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4562; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224562 - 18 Nov 2019
Abstract
(1) Background: Squatting is one of the common closed-kinetic chain (CKC) exercises for knee rehabilitation. Some patients cannot perform squatting exercises on land occasionally due to knee pain. Several studies had suggested that lower limb muscle activities are lower in water than [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Squatting is one of the common closed-kinetic chain (CKC) exercises for knee rehabilitation. Some patients cannot perform squatting exercises on land occasionally due to knee pain. Several studies had suggested that lower limb muscle activities are lower in water than on land while performing CKC exercises. The purpose of this study is to investigate the surface electromyography (sEMG) activities of Rectus femoris (RF) and Biceps femoris (BF) muscles when doing a squatting exercise in water and on land. (2) Methods: This was a cross-sectional experimental study. A total of 20 healthy participants (10 males, 10 females) were recruited by convenience sampling. The sEMG of RF and BF muscles in water and on land were collected and the knee motions were videotaped. Participants were instructed to perform closed kinetic-chain back squatting exercises at a specific speed (30 beats per minute) in water and on land at angular speed of 45°/s. Eight repetitions of the squatting exercise (0–90° knee flexion) were performed. The mean percentage maximal voluntary contraction (%MVC) between two muscles was compared in two conditions. The %MVC of RF and BF muscles at different specific knee flexion angles (30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion) was also identified. (3) Result: Muscle activities of RF (p = 0.01) and BF (p < 0.01) muscles were significantly lower in water than on land. The %MVC of RF and BF muscles was found to be 15.01% and 10.68% lower in water than on land respectively. For different knee angle phases, the differences in %MVC between land and water had significant difference for both RF muscles and BF muscles. (4) Conclusion: This study found a difference of mean percentage MVC of RF and BF muscles between land and water in different phases of squatting. The water medium reduced the two muscles’ activities to a similar extent. The result showed that the aquatic environment allows an individual to perform squatting with less muscle activation which may serve as an alternative knee exercise option for patients who encounter difficulty in land squatting due to lower limb muscle weakness or a high level of knee pain. Full article
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