E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Air Pollution and Cardiopulmonary Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kai-Jen Chuang

Department of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +886919444256
Interests: air pollution measurement, prevention, and intervention; cardiovascular health; respiratory health; environmental epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Air pollution is a major environment-related risk factor for health across the world. The leading health outcome attributed to air pollution is cardiopulmonary effects, including respiratory infections, cardiovascular diseases, and lung cancer. The World Health Organization has announced that ambient air pollution contributed to 7.6% of all deaths in 2016. However, the mechanism linking air pollution to cardiopulmonary effects is largely unknown. Moreover, the studies of air pollution-related cardiopulmonary biomarkers, air pollution composition, and cardiopulmonary heath risk assessment, the association between air quality improvement and cardiopulmonary health promotion, and so on, are still limited. Therefore, we invite you to consider submitting your research for publication in this Special Issue of the journal, focusing on “Air Pollution and Cardiopulmonary Health”. The aim of this Special Issue is to communicate a selection of papers on the measurement, assessment, prevention, and intervention of air pollution induced cardiopulmonary effects among human subjects. In vitro and in vivo studies are also very welcome.

Prof. Dr. Kai-Jen Chuang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Particulate matter
  • Ozone
  • Volatile organic compounds
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Respiratory diseases
  • Lung function
  • Heart rate
  • Blood pressure
  • Inflammation

Published Papers (7 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-7
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Occupational Health Hazards Due to Particulate Matter Originated from Spices
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1519; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091519
Received: 13 March 2019 / Revised: 18 April 2019 / Accepted: 23 April 2019 / Published: 29 April 2019
PDF Full-text (1583 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Spices have been known for their various health activities; however, they also possess the allergic potential for the respiratory system and the skin as they are fine particulate matter. Persons involved in spice agriculture and food industries are at greater risk since they [...] Read more.
Spices have been known for their various health activities; however, they also possess the allergic potential for the respiratory system and the skin as they are fine particulate matter. Persons involved in spice agriculture and food industries are at greater risk since they are exposed to a considerable amount of combustible dust, which may be the cause of fire and explosion and adversely affect the health. These workers may experience allergy, long-term and short-term respiratory issues including occupational asthma, dermatitis, etc. Some spices induce T cell-based inflammatory reaction upon contact recognition of the antigen. Antigen Presenting Cells (APC) on binding to the causative metabolite results in activation of macrophages by allergen cytokine interleukin (IL)-12 and tumor necrosis factor-beta (TNF). Cross-reactivity for protein allergens is another factor which seems to be a significant trigger for the stimulation of allergic reactions. Thus, it was imperative to perform a systematic review along with bioinformatics based representation of some evident allergens has been done to identify the overall conservation of epitopes. In the present manuscript, we have covered a multifold approach, i.e., to categorize the spice particles based on a clear understanding about nature, origin, mechanisms; to assess metabolic reactions of the particles after exposure as well as knowledge on the conditions of exposure along with associated potential health effects. Another aim of this study is to provide some suggestions to prevent and to control the exposure up to some extent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution and Cardiopulmonary Health)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Alterations by Air Pollution in Inflammation and Metals in Pleural Effusion of Pneumonia Patients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 705; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050705
Received: 7 January 2019 / Revised: 18 February 2019 / Accepted: 22 February 2019 / Published: 27 February 2019
PDF Full-text (336 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Air pollution is known to increase the risk of pneumonia. However, the effects of air pollution on the pleural effusion of patients with pneumonia are unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate alterations in inflammatory–immune biomarkers by air pollution in patients [...] Read more.
Air pollution is known to increase the risk of pneumonia. However, the effects of air pollution on the pleural effusion of patients with pneumonia are unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate alterations in inflammatory–immune biomarkers by air pollution in patients with pneumonia by analyzing their pleural effusion. Patients who had undergone thoracentesis to drain their pleural effusion in a hospital were recruited for this study. Patients with pneumonia and those with congestive heart failure respectively served as the case and control groups. We observed that an increase of 1 ppb in one-year NO2 was associated with a decrease of 0.105 ng/mL in cluster of differentiation 62 (CD62) (95% confidence interval (CI) = −0.085, −0.004, p < 0.05) in the pleural effusion. Furthermore, we observed that an increase in one−year 1 ppb of NO2 was associated with a decrease of 0.026 ng/mL in molybdenum (Mo) (95% CI = −0.138, −0.020, p < 0.05). An increase in one-year 1 ppb of SO2 was associated with a decrease of 0.531 ng/mL in zinc (95% CI = −0.164, −0.006, p < 0.05). Also, an increase in one-year 1 ppb of O3 was associated with a decrease of 0.025 ng/mL in Mo (95% CI = −0.372, −0.053, p < 0.05). In conclusion, air pollution exposure, especially gaseous pollution, may be associated with the regulation of immune responses and changes in metal levels in the pleural effusion of pneumonia patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution and Cardiopulmonary Health)
Open AccessArticle
Estimating Ground-Level Concentrations of Multiple Air Pollutants and Their Health Impacts in the Huaihe River Basin in China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(4), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040579
Received: 3 January 2019 / Revised: 6 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 February 2019 / Published: 16 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5259 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Air pollutants existing in the environment may have negative impacts on human health depending on their toxicity and concentrations. Remote sensing data enable researchers to map concentrations of various air pollutants over vast areas. By combining ground-level concentrations with population data, the spatial [...] Read more.
Air pollutants existing in the environment may have negative impacts on human health depending on their toxicity and concentrations. Remote sensing data enable researchers to map concentrations of various air pollutants over vast areas. By combining ground-level concentrations with population data, the spatial distribution of health impacts attributed to air pollutants can be acquired. This study took five highly populated and severely polluted provinces along the Huaihe River, China, as the research area. The ground-level concentrations of four major air pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfate dioxide (SO2), particulate matters with diameter equal or less than 10 (PM10) or 2.5 micron (PM2.5) were estimated based on relevant remote sensing data using the geographically weighted regression (GWR) model. The health impacts of these pollutants were then assessed with the aid of co-located gridded population data. The results show that the annual average concentrations of ground-level NO2, SO2, PM10, and PM2.5 in 2016 were 31 µg/m3, 26 µg/m3, 100 µg/m3, and 59 µg/m3, respectively. In terms of the health impacts attributable to NO2, SO2, PM10, and PM2.5, there were 546, 1788, 10,595, and 8364 respiratory deaths, and 1221, 9666, 46,954, and 39,524 cardiovascular deaths, respectively. Northern Henan, west-central Shandong, southern Jiangsu, and Wuhan City in Hubei are prone to large health risks. Meanwhile, air pollutants have an overall greater impact on cardiovascular disease than respiratory disease, which is primarily attributable to the inhalable particle matters. Our findings provide a good reference to local decision makers for the implementation of further emission control strategies and possible health impacts assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution and Cardiopulmonary Health)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Particulate Matter Emissions of Four Different Cigarette Types of One Popular Brand: Influence of Tobacco Strength and Additives
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(2), 263; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16020263
Received: 29 November 2018 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 17 January 2019
PDF Full-text (1062 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The inhalation of particulate matter (PM) in second-hand smoke (SHS) is hazardous to health of smokers and non-smokers. Tobacco strength (amount of tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide) and different additives might have an effect on the amount of PM. This study aimed to [...] Read more.
The inhalation of particulate matter (PM) in second-hand smoke (SHS) is hazardous to health of smokers and non-smokers. Tobacco strength (amount of tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide) and different additives might have an effect on the amount of PM. This study aimed to investigate the influence of tobacco strength or additives on PM. Four cigarette types of the brand Marlboro with different strengths and with or without additives were analyzed in comparison to the 3R4F reference cigarette. SHS was generated by an automatic environmental tobacco smoke emitter (AETSE) in an enclosed space with a volume of 2.88 m³. PM concentrations (PM10, PM2.5, PM1) were measured with a laser aerosol spectrometer followed by statistical analysis. The two strongest Marlboro brands (Red and Red without additives) showed the highest PM concentrations of all tested cigarettes. The measured mean concentrations Cmean of PM10 increased up to 1458 µg/m³ for the Marlboro Red without additives (PM2.5: 1452 µg/m³, PM1: 1263 µg/m³). The similarly strong Marlboro Red showed very similar PM values. The second strongest type Marlboro Gold showed 36% (PM10, PM2.5) and 32% (PM1) lower values, respectively. The “lightest” type Marlboro Silver Blue showed 54% (PM10, PM2.5) or 50% (PM1) lower PM values. The results indicate that the lower the tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide amounts, as well as the longer the cigarette filter, the lower are the PM levels. An influence of additives could not be determined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution and Cardiopulmonary Health)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Particulate Matter during Seasonal Smog on Quality of Life and Lung Function in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010106
Received: 9 November 2018 / Revised: 21 December 2018 / Accepted: 27 December 2018 / Published: 2 January 2019
PDF Full-text (297 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The impact of outdoor air pollution on the quality of life (QoL) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, as measured by the COPD assessment test (CAT) questionnaire, is limited. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a short-term [...] Read more.
The impact of outdoor air pollution on the quality of life (QoL) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, as measured by the COPD assessment test (CAT) questionnaire, is limited. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a short-term increase in outdoor particulate matter in which the particles are less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10) during a seasonal smog period on QoL, symptoms, and lung function in COPD patients. This prospective observational study was conducted at Chiang Dao Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand between March and August 2016. Measurement of QoL, severity of dyspnea, forced vital capacity (FVC), and forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) were performed at both high and low PM10 periods. Fifty-nine patients met the inclusion criteria for enrollment into the study, with the mean age being 71.5 ± 8.0 years. Total CAT score, but not mMRC score, was statistically higher during the high PM10 period. The two lung function parameters, FVC and FEV1, were significantly lower at the high PM10 compared to the low PM10 period. We concluded that exposure to PM10 during the seasonal smog period resulted in short-term negative impact on the quality of life and lung function in COPD patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution and Cardiopulmonary Health)
Open AccessArticle
Association between Atmospheric Particulate Pollutants and Mortality for Cardio-Cerebrovascular Diseases in Chinese Korean Population: A Case-Crossover Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2835; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122835
Received: 4 November 2018 / Revised: 5 December 2018 / Accepted: 8 December 2018 / Published: 12 December 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (309 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Air pollution in large Chinese cities has led to recent studies that highlighted the relationship between particulate matters (PM) and elevated risk of cardio-cerebrovascular mortality. However, it is unclear as to whether: (1) The same adverse relations exist in cities with relatively [...] Read more.
Background: Air pollution in large Chinese cities has led to recent studies that highlighted the relationship between particulate matters (PM) and elevated risk of cardio-cerebrovascular mortality. However, it is unclear as to whether: (1) The same adverse relations exist in cities with relatively low levels of air pollution; and (2) the relationship between the two are similar across ethnic groups. Methods: We collected data of PM2.5 (PM with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 µm) and PM10 (aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 µm) in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2016. Using a time-stratified case-crossover design, we investigated whether levels of particulate pollutants influence the risk of cardio-cerebrovascular disease mortality among ethnic Korean vs. ethnic Han residents residing in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture. Results: Under the single air pollutant model, the odds ratios (ORs) of cardio-cerebrovascular disease were 1.025 (1.024–1.026) for each 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 at lag0 day, 1.012 (1.011–1.013) for each 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10 at lag1 day. In the multi-pollutant model adjusted by PM10, SO2, and NO2, the ORs of cardio-cerebrovascular disease were 1.150 (1.145–1.155) for ethnic Koreans and 1.154 (1.149–1.158) for ethnic Hans for each 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5. In the multi-pollutant model adjusted by PM2.5, SO2, and NO2, the ORs of cardio-cerebrovascular disease were 1.050 (1.047–1.053) for ethnic Koreans and 1.041 (1.039–1.043) for ethnic Hans for each 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10. Conclusion: This study showed that PM2.5 and PM10 were associated with increased risks of acute death events in residential cardio-cerebrovascular disease in Yanbian, China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution and Cardiopulmonary Health)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Meta-Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Effects of Wildfire Smoke Exposure on Respiratory Health in North America
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 960; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16060960
Received: 19 February 2019 / Revised: 12 March 2019 / Accepted: 14 March 2019 / Published: 18 March 2019
PDF Full-text (771 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Epidemiological studies consistently show an association between wildfire-related smoke exposure and adverse respiratory health. We conducted a systematic review of evidence in published literature pertaining to heterogeneity of respiratory effects from this exposure in North America. We calculated the within-study ratio of relative [...] Read more.
Epidemiological studies consistently show an association between wildfire-related smoke exposure and adverse respiratory health. We conducted a systematic review of evidence in published literature pertaining to heterogeneity of respiratory effects from this exposure in North America. We calculated the within-study ratio of relative risks (RRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to examine heterogeneity of effect by population subgroup, and then summarized the RRRs using meta-analysis. We found evidence of a greater effect of wildfire smoke on respiratory health among females relative to males for asthma (RRR: 1.035, 95% CI: 1.013, 1.057) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (RRR: 1.018, 95% CI: 1.003, 1.032). There was evidence of a lower relative risk for all respiratory outcomes among youth compared to adults (RRR: 0.976, 95% CI: 0.963, 0.989). We also found wildfire smoke effects stratified by income, race, education, health behaviors, access to care, housing occupancy, geographic region, and urban/rural status. However, data were insufficient to quantitatively evaluate effect modification by these characteristics. While we found evidence that certain demographic subgroups of the population are more susceptible to respiratory health outcomes from wildfire smoke, it is unclear whether this information can be used to inform policy aimed to reduce health impact of wildfires. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution and Cardiopulmonary Health)
Figures

Figure 1

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top