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Addiction Behavior

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2023) | Viewed by 5725

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: addiction behavior; psychological behavior; gambling; internet addiction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Behavioural addiction involves a compulsion to seek a “natural reward” regardless of negative consequences. During the last decade, notions of addiction have undergone remarkable expansion. Initially, addiction referred exclusively to the consumption of substances (e.g., alcohol and heroin); however, the current spectrum of addictions includes a multifaceted group of disorders in which the object of the addiction is not just a substance, but a legitimate and socially accepted, or even encouraged, activity (e.g., gambling, sex, food, internet use, or compulsive shopping). Behavioural addiction can influence or distort the individual experience of many people at different levels of severity. It involves a particular involvement in a repetitive and persistent habit that disregards consequences and more or less rapidly develops a condition of tolerance. Moreover, all addictive behaviour seems to be accompanied by some form of craving. People become addicted to experiences that can alter their mood and feelings; thus, even before being a neurobiological condition or a social problem, addiction can be considered an individual phenomenon that may arise in the course of psychological development as a response to specific factors.

We propose a Special Issue on the topic of addiction behavior (gambling, gaming, shopping, internet addiction, sex addiction, etc.).

For this Special Issue, we are seeking submissions of quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed-methods research (original research articles, reviews, case reports, case series) that can include topics such as: the etiology of addictive behaviors; neurobiological predisposition; psychological, behavioural and cognitive factors; treatment; prevention techniques; and the study of comorbidities. Innovative research is particularly encouraged.

Dr. Emanuela Mari
Dr. Laura Piccardi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • behavioral addictions
  • psychophysical health
  • disorder
  • prevention
  • psychopathology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 416 KiB  
Article
Exercise Dependence in Practitioners of Martial Arts and Combat Sports
by Karolina Kostorz, Wojciech J. Cynarski and Jacek Polechoński
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16782; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416782 - 14 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1487
Abstract
Background: The aim of this study was to analyse prevalence exercise dependence among practicing martial arts and combat sports. Methods: There were 166 respondents. The Exercise Dependence Scale—EDS was used. Results: The martial arts practitioners obtained a lower result in the ‘intention effects’ [...] Read more.
Background: The aim of this study was to analyse prevalence exercise dependence among practicing martial arts and combat sports. Methods: There were 166 respondents. The Exercise Dependence Scale—EDS was used. Results: The martial arts practitioners obtained a lower result in the ‘intention effects’ (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.03), ‘continuance’ (p = 0.04; η2 = 0.03), ‘lack of control’ (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.03), ‘reduction in other activities’ (p = 0.04; η2 = 0.03), and ‘total score’ (p = 0.04; η2 = 0.03) than the combat sports athletes. Both the respondents with a high training rank (p < 0.05) and subjects with above 5 years of training experience (p = 0.03; η2 = 0.03) achieved the higher mean in the ‘time’ subscale. Women obtained lower results in the case of ‘tolerance’ (p = 0.04; η2 = 0.04). The regression coefficient indicates that the higher respondent’s age, the lower total score she/he will achieve in the EDS. Conclusions: The findings have practical implications for identifying subjects ‘at-risk for exercise dependence’ symptoms, and may aid coaches and individuals in the implementation of a prevention program, to seek suitable support. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addiction Behavior)
12 pages, 2021 KiB  
Article
A Collector Deceives—About the Ways of Deceiving Women by Men and Men by Women as far as Spending Money on Collecting Items Is Concerned
by Tomasz Wirga and Anna Kopczak-Wirga
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16755; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416755 - 14 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1547
Abstract
The presented research shows that neither women nor men are honest with their partners when informing them about the amount of money spent on collecting items. Their behaviour may show signs of addiction to collecting. Men in comparison to women spend more and [...] Read more.
The presented research shows that neither women nor men are honest with their partners when informing them about the amount of money spent on collecting items. Their behaviour may show signs of addiction to collecting. Men in comparison to women spend more and are less likely to lower the amounts of money spent on collected items. Those who earn more spend more on their collections. Women and men also use different techniques of hiding their expenses. Women do not inform about their expenses using denying techniques (such as saying that it was bought/borrowed a long time ago, etc.), whereas men inform about expenses but use preventive techniques (such as exchange). What is more, men tend to use a technique of lowering real costs “by a given amount”, whilst women use a technique “up to a given amount”; that is, they inform that they did not spend more than a given amount. In addition, the partners of collectors are aware that they are being cheated. On the other hand, collectors see the motivation for their lies in the misunderstanding of the hobby by their partners. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addiction Behavior)
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12 pages, 358 KiB  
Article
Correlations between Problematic Mobile Phone Use and Depressiveness and Daytime Sleepiness, as Well as Perceived Social Support in Adolescents
by Marta Nowak, Kamila Rachubińska, Małgorzata Starczewska, Ewa Kupcewicz, Aleksandra Szylińska, Aneta Cymbaluk-Płoska and Elżbieta Grochans
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(20), 13549; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192013549 - 19 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2075
Abstract
(1) The aim of this study was to estimate the scale of mobile phone addiction among young adults as well as to establish whether the low level of perceived social support is related to problematic smartphone use, and whether an addictive pattern of [...] Read more.
(1) The aim of this study was to estimate the scale of mobile phone addiction among young adults as well as to establish whether the low level of perceived social support is related to problematic smartphone use, and whether an addictive pattern of mobile phone use is related to the prevalence of depressiveness and excessive daytime sleepiness. (2) The study was carried out using the diagnostic poll method via the questionnaire technique. Both the author’s own questionnaire and the following standardized research tools were used: the Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale for Adolescents (MPPUSA), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). (3) Perceived social support was significantly lower in the group of respondents who problematically used their mobile phones in comparison with the ones who used them in a proper way. Severity of depressive symptoms and daytime sleepiness was significantly higher in respondents addicted to their mobiles compared to nonaddicted ones. (4) Conclusions: An important correlation between phone addiction and the prevalence of depressive symptoms and excessive daytime sleepiness exists. Problematic mobile phone use concerns individuals with low levels of perceived social support. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Addiction Behavior)
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