Special Issue "Selenium in Horticultural Crops"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 2221

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Xiaohu Zhao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Resources & Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
Interests: plant nutrition and fruit quality; trace elements and plant health; agricultural eco-environmental security; plant–microbe interactions; biotic and abiotic stress
Prof. Dr. Linxi Yuan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou 215123, China
Interests: selenium; heavey metals; plant microbiota; Se hyperaccumulator; one health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element for humans and animals, but not for plants. Although recent studies demonstrated that Se could be a beneficial trace element for staple crops, including growth promotion, abiotic/biotic stress tolerance (e.g., cold, drought, pathogens, pest diseases), and nutrition improvement, few studies have been performed on horticultural crops. In fact, since horticultural plants are nutrition-rich and have high economic value, it would be significant to study if Se could have a positive influence on growth, stress tolerance, nutritional value, and even the economic value of horticultural plants. Thus, we propose a Special Issue on “Se in Horticultural Crops” and call for more comprehensive studies on horticultural crops from around the world. The following topics will be welcomed (not an exhaustive list):

  • Se analysis methods in horticultural crops;
  • Se distribution in horticultural crops;
  • Se role in plant growth in horticultural crops;
  • Se role in stress tolerance in horticultural crops;
  • Se functions in horticultural crops;
  • Interactions between Se and heavy metals in horticultural crops;
  • Interactions between Se and microbiota in horticultural crops;
  • Se biofortification in horticultural crops;
  • Metabolism of Se in horticultural crops.

Prof. Dr. Xiaohu Zhao
Prof. Dr. Linxi Yuan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • selenium
  • horticultural crops
  • plant growth
  • stress tolerance
  • Se functions
  • Se metabolism
  • Se biofortification

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Determination of Selenium Speciation in High Se-Enriched Edible Fungus Ganoderma lucidum Via Sequential Extraction
Horticulturae 2023, 9(2), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9020161 - 27 Jan 2023
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Abstract
Edible fungi are often used as an important selenium (Se) source to improve human daily Se intakes as food or Se supplements because of their strong ability to accumulate Se, in which Ganoderma lucidum was widely accepted in China. However, the existing Se [...] Read more.
Edible fungi are often used as an important selenium (Se) source to improve human daily Se intakes as food or Se supplements because of their strong ability to accumulate Se, in which Ganoderma lucidum was widely accepted in China. However, the existing Se speciation analysis methods such as protease K-based or trypsin-protease XIV-based, have low extraction rate and enzymatic hydrolysis rate (<30%) on the Se-enriched edible fungi, resulting that it is impossible to effectively evaluate Se transformation and safety of Se-enriched edible fungi. In order to improve the extraction rate and enzymatic hydrolysis rates, 12 extraction methods (combination of buffer solutions and enzymes) including 4 two-step extraction methods and 8 three-step extraction methods were applied to extract Se from high Se-enriched Ganoderma lucidum (Total Se content 245.7 μg/g in dry matter (DW)) in the present study. The results displayed that one three-step sequential extraction method as aqueous solution extraction-pepsin extraction-trypsin extraction performed the best, by which the total Se extraction rate could reach 65%, the total Se enzyme hydrolysis rate was 40%, and the Se speciation was revealed as SeCys2 (52.1%), SeMeCys (38.3%) and SeMet (9.6%) in high Se-enriched Ganoderma lucidum. This study offers a reliable and efficient method to evaluate the Se transformation and the Se safety in high Se-enriched edible fungi. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selenium in Horticultural Crops)
Article
Biomass, Phenolic Compounds, Essential Oil Content, and Antioxidant Properties of Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L.) Grown in Hydroponics as Affected by Treatment Type and Selenium Concentration
Horticulturae 2022, 8(11), 1037; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8111037 - 05 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 659
Abstract
Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L.) is an aromatic plant that is rich in various biologically active compounds and is widely used as a natural preservative and flavoring agent in the food and cosmetic industry and as a folk medicine against certain respiratory diseases. [...] Read more.
Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L.) is an aromatic plant that is rich in various biologically active compounds and is widely used as a natural preservative and flavoring agent in the food and cosmetic industry and as a folk medicine against certain respiratory diseases. Despite the fact that selenium is not an essential trace element for plants, in a certain range of concentrations it can not only improve plant growth, but also increase the content of nutrients and biologically active compounds in plants. In the present study, the effect of treatment type (in a nutrient solution (NS) or by foliar application (FA)) and selenium (Se) concentration (2.0, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0, 40.0 μM) on the biomass, phenolic compounds, essential oil content, and antioxidant properties of hyssop grown in hydroponics was studied. Neither a toxic nor a beneficial effect of Se addition on the plants was observed. Selenium treatment significantly increased Se concentration in hyssop up to 38.35 μg g−1 (NS) and 34.86 μg g−1 (FA). The effect of selenium on the content of phenolic compounds, essential oil, and the antioxidant activity of hyssop depended on the applied selenium concentration. Hyssop treated with 10 μM Se (NS) and with 20 μM Se (FA) had a higher total content of hydroxycinnamic acids and higher contents of rosmarinic and chlorogenic acids, as well as a higher total content of phenolic compounds, higher content of essential oil, and higher antioxidant activity compared to other experimental plants. The results confirm the feasibility of selenium treatment of hyssop without reducing its production in order to enhance its nutritional and pharmaceutical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selenium in Horticultural Crops)
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Article
Combination of Selenium and Methyl Jasmonate Controls Postharvest Tomato Gray Mold by Damaging the Membrane System
Horticulturae 2022, 8(9), 782; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8090782 - 28 Aug 2022
Viewed by 694
Abstract
Tomato, which is regarded as an important worldwide crop, is susceptible to gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea. Selenium and methyl jasmonate can act as antifungal agents against pathogenic infections. To clarify the effect of selenium and methyl jasmonate on the fungal [...] Read more.
Tomato, which is regarded as an important worldwide crop, is susceptible to gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea. Selenium and methyl jasmonate can act as antifungal agents against pathogenic infections. To clarify the effect of selenium and methyl jasmonate on the fungal pathogen, the spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea were investigated in vitro using the growth rate method. Additionally, the electrical conductivity, soluble protein content, malondialdehyde content and oxalic acid secretion of B. cinerea mycelium were also determined to further explore the antifungal mechanism of selenium and methyl jasmonate. The results showed that selenium application significantly increased cell membrane permeability and malondialdehyde content, and methyl jasmonate treatment decreased the soluble protein content in mycelium of B. cinerea. Furthermore, supplementation of the medium with both selenium and methyl jasmonate effectively inhibited spore germination and colony growth of B. cinerea by compromising membrane integrity, and significantly reduced soluble protein content and the oxalic acid secretion of hypha. The resulting incidence of postharvest tomato gray mold with the combination of selenium and methyl jasmonate was 34.7%, which was approximately half of that of the control. To sum up, the combined use of selenium and methyl jasmonate inhibited the normal physiological activity and pathogenicity of B. cinerea, which suggests that selenium and methyl jasmonate have the potential for controlling gray mold disease caused by B. cinerea in postharvest fruits and vegetables. These findings may offer a promising and eco-friendly strategy to control gray mold disease in postharvest fruits and vegetables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selenium in Horticultural Crops)
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