Special Issue "Detection and Characterization of Extrasolar Planets"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Mahmoudreza Oshagh

Institute for Astrophysics, University of Göttingen, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: extrasolar planets; stellar magnetic activity; planetary atmosphere; eclipsing binaries; architecture of exoplanet systems
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jesus Martinez-Frias

Instituto de Geociencias, IGEO (CSIC-UCM), C/ Del Doctor Severo Ochoa 7, Facultad de Medicina (Edificio Entrepabellones 7 y 8), 28040 Madrid, Spain
E-Mail
Phone: +34 91 3944829
Fax: +34 91 3944798
Interests: Geoscience education, Conceptual change, Curriculum reform; social relevance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Geosciences is dedicated to Exoplantary Science. Exoplanetary science is a vigorous and exciting new area of astrophysics and planetary sciences. Since the revolutionary discovery of a planet orbiting a solar-like star 51 Peg (Mayor and Queloz 1995) about 3600 exoplanets have been discovered in around 2700 planetary systems, which place our unique Solar System into context through the new field of comparative planetology. The radial velocity technique, which is based on detecting changes in the color of a star due to wobble of the host star in response to an exoplanet's gravity, and the photometric transit technique, which is based on measuring the dim in stellar light due to transits of an exoplanet in front of its disk, are the two main techniques that have been used to detect and characterize most known exoplanets. Other techniques, namely, gravitational microlensing, astrometry, and direct imaging, also have been used to detect several exoplanets. Recent and upcoming ground and space-based telescopes and facilities, which provide high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations, allow us to accurately detect and characterize exoplanetary systems, including their atmosphere and architectures. Thus, we are living in an exciting time, in which we have been detecting Earth-sized exoplanets in the habitable zone of their host stars, and we are getting closer to the detection of Earth twins. The comprehensive information about exoplanetary systems and their host stars combined with our knowledge of solar system’s content will lead us toward a complete understanding about the exoplanetary atmospheres, their potential geodynamics, formation, evolution, and habitability conditions.

Therefore, the main goal of this Special Issue of Geosciences is to collect papers on original research, inspiring reviews, and an outlook of open and challenging problems in the near future.

It is recommended that authors approach the Guest Editor at an early stage about possible submissions in order to verify the appropriateness of their potential contributions. If appropriate, an abstract will be requested, and the corresponding author will be required to submit the full manuscript online by the deadline of 30 June 2018.

Dr. Mahmoudreza Oshagh
Prof. Dr. Jesus Martinez-Frias
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • exoplanet detection
  • exoplanet characterization
  • stellar activity induced noise
  • future instrumentation
  • exoplanets’ atmosphere
  • architecture of exoplanet systems

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Quantitative Comparison of Exoplanet Catalogs
Geosciences 2018, 8(9), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8090325
Received: 30 July 2018 / Revised: 23 August 2018 / Accepted: 25 August 2018 / Published: 29 August 2018
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Abstract
In this study, we investigated the differences between four commonly-used exoplanet catalogs (exoplanet.eu; exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu; openexoplanetcatalogue.com; exoplanets.org) using a Kolmogorov–Smirnov (KS) test. We found a relatively good agreement in terms of the planetary parameters (mass, radius, period) and stellar properties (mass, temperature, metallicity), although
[...] Read more.
In this study, we investigated the differences between four commonly-used exoplanet catalogs (exoplanet.eu; exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu; openexoplanetcatalogue.com; exoplanets.org) using a Kolmogorov–Smirnov (KS) test. We found a relatively good agreement in terms of the planetary parameters (mass, radius, period) and stellar properties (mass, temperature, metallicity), although a more careful analysis of the overlap and unique parts of each catalog revealed some differences. We quantified the statistical impact of these differences and their potential cause. We concluded that although statistical studies are unlikely to be significantly affected by the choice of catalog, it would be desirable to have one consistent catalog accepted by the general exoplanet community as a base for exoplanet statistics and comparison with theoretical predictions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Detection and Characterization of Extrasolar Planets)
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Open AccessArticle Selective Aggregation Experiments on Planetesimal Formation and Mercury-Like Planets
Geosciences 2018, 8(9), 310; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8090310
Received: 21 June 2018 / Revised: 17 August 2018 / Accepted: 18 August 2018 / Published: 21 August 2018
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Abstract
Much of a planet’s composition could be determined right at the onset of formation. Laboratory experiments can constrain these early steps. This includes static tensile strength measurements or collisions carried out under Earth’s gravity and on various microgravity platforms. Among the variety of
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Much of a planet’s composition could be determined right at the onset of formation. Laboratory experiments can constrain these early steps. This includes static tensile strength measurements or collisions carried out under Earth’s gravity and on various microgravity platforms. Among the variety of extrasolar planets which eventually form are (Exo)-Mercury, terrestrial planets with high density. If they form in inner protoplanetary disks, high temperature experiments are mandatory but they are still rare. Beyond the initial process of hit-and-stick collisions, some additional selective processing might be needed to explain Mercury. In analogy to icy worlds, such planets might, e.g., form in environments which are enriched in iron. This requires methods to separate iron and silicate at early stages. Photophoresis might be one viable way. Mercury and Mercury-like planets might also form due to the ferromagnetic properties of iron and mechanisms like magnetic aggregation in disk magnetic fields might become important. This review highlights some of the mechanisms with the potential to trigger Mercury formation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Detection and Characterization of Extrasolar Planets)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Multi-Wavelength High-Resolution Spectroscopy for Exoplanet Detection: Motivation, Instrumentation and First Results
Geosciences 2018, 8(8), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8080289
Received: 30 June 2018 / Revised: 30 July 2018 / Accepted: 31 July 2018 / Published: 3 August 2018
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Abstract
Exoplanet research has shown an incessant growth since the first claim of a hot giant planet around a solar-like star in the mid-1990s. Today, the new facilities are working to spot the first habitable rocky planets around low-mass stars as a forerunner for
[...] Read more.
Exoplanet research has shown an incessant growth since the first claim of a hot giant planet around a solar-like star in the mid-1990s. Today, the new facilities are working to spot the first habitable rocky planets around low-mass stars as a forerunner for the detection of the long-awaited Sun-Earth analog system. All the achievements in this field would not have been possible without the constant development of the technology and of new methods to detect more and more challenging planets. After the consolidation of a top-level instrumentation for high-resolution spectroscopy in the visible wavelength range, a huge effort is now dedicated to reaching the same precision and accuracy in the near-infrared. Actually, observations in this range present several advantages in the search for exoplanets around M dwarfs, known to be the most favorable targets to detect possible habitable planets. They are also characterized by intense stellar activity, which hampers planet detection, but its impact on the radial velocity modulation is mitigated in the infrared. Simultaneous observations in the visible and near-infrared ranges appear to be an even more powerful technique since they provide combined and complementary information, also useful for many other exoplanetary science cases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Detection and Characterization of Extrasolar Planets)
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