Feature Review Papers in Geosciences

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 8445

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Geociencias, IGEO (CSIC-UCM), C/ Del Doctor Severo Ochoa 7, Edificio Entrepabellones 7 y 8, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: planetary geosciences; meteorites; geoeducation; geoethics; mineralogy; geochemistry; sustainability; conceptual changes; astrobiology; future earth
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is designed to publish high-quality review papers in Geosciences. The issue will highlight a diverse set of topics related to earth science, including solid earth, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. We are particularly interested in receiving manuscripts that review experimental and theoretical/computational studies.

The scope of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Structural Geology;
  • Geochemistry, mineralogy, petrology, and volcanology;
  • Natural hazards;
  • Geomorphology;
  • Hydrogeology;
  • Geodynamics;
  • Sedimentology, stratigraphy, and palaeontology;
  • Hydrology and hydrogeology;
  • Stratigraphy and sedimentology;
  • Climate: past, present, and future;
  • Cryosphere;
  • Biogeosciences;
  • Seismology;
  • Geoheritage, geotourism, geoparks, and geoconversation;
  • Geohealth.

Prof. Dr. Jesus Martinez-Frias
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

13 pages, 1871 KiB  
Review
The Role of Fluids in Melting the Continental Crust and Generating Granitoids: An Overview
by Jiahao Li, Xing Ding and Junfeng Liu
Geosciences 2022, 12(8), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences12080285 - 22 Jul 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2937
Abstract
Granite is a distinctive constituent part of the continental crust on Earth, the formation and evolution of which have long been hot research topics. In this paper, we reviewed the partial melting processes of crustal rocks without or with fluid assistance and summarized [...] Read more.
Granite is a distinctive constituent part of the continental crust on Earth, the formation and evolution of which have long been hot research topics. In this paper, we reviewed the partial melting processes of crustal rocks without or with fluid assistance and summarized the role of fluids and volatiles involved in the formation of granitic melts. As a conventional model, granitoids were thought to be derived from the dehydration melting of hydrous minerals in crustal basement metamorphic rocks in the absence of external fluids. However, the external-fluid-assisted melting of crustal metamorphic rocks has recently been proposed to produce granitoids as extensive fluids could be active in the deep continental crust, especially in the subduction zones. It has been demonstrated experimentally that H2O plays a crucial role in the partial melting of crustal rocks, in which H2O can (1) significantly lower the solidus temperature of the melted rocks to facilitate partial melting; (2) affect the melting reaction process, mineral stability, and the composition of melt; and (3) help the melt to separate more easily from the source area and aggregate to form a large-scale magma chamber. More importantly, dissolved volatiles and salts in the crustal fluids could also lower the solidus temperature of rocks, affect the partitioning behaviors of trace elements between minerals and melts, and facilitate the formation of some distinctive granitoids (e.g., B-rich, F-rich, and high-K granitoids). Furthermore, various volatiles dissolved in fluids could result in elemental or isotopic fractionation as well as the diversity of mineralization during fluid-assisted melting. In-depth studies regarding the fluid-assisted partial melting of crustal rocks will facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of melting of the Earth’s crust, thus providing strong theoretical constraints on the genesis and mineralization of granitoids as well as the formation and evolution of the continental crust. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers in Geosciences)
Show Figures

Figure 1

34 pages, 959 KiB  
Review
Squeezing Data from a Rock: Machine Learning for Martian Science
by Timothy Paul Nagle-McNaughton, Louis Anthony Scuderi and Nicholas Erickson
Geosciences 2022, 12(6), 248; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences12060248 - 15 Jun 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4842
Abstract
Data analysis methods have scarcely kept pace with the rapid increase in Earth observations, spurring the development of novel algorithms, storage methods, and computational techniques. For scientists interested in Mars, the problem is always the same: there is simultaneously never enough of the [...] Read more.
Data analysis methods have scarcely kept pace with the rapid increase in Earth observations, spurring the development of novel algorithms, storage methods, and computational techniques. For scientists interested in Mars, the problem is always the same: there is simultaneously never enough of the right data and an overwhelming amount of data in total. Finding sufficient data needles in a haystack to test a hypothesis requires hours of manual data screening, and more needles and hay are added constantly. To date, the vast majority of Martian research has been focused on either one-off local/regional studies or on hugely time-consuming manual global studies. Machine learning in its numerous forms can be helpful for future such work. Machine learning has the potential to help map and classify a large variety of both features and properties on the surface of Mars and to aid in the planning and execution of future missions. Here, we outline the current extent of machine learning as applied to Mars, summarize why machine learning should be an important tool for planetary geomorphology in particular, and suggest numerous research avenues and funding priorities for future efforts. We conclude that: (1) moving toward methods that require less human input (i.e., self- or semi-supervised) is an important paradigm shift for Martian applications, (2) new robust methods using generative adversarial networks to generate synthetic high-resolution digital terrain models represent an exciting new avenue for Martian geomorphologists, (3) more effort and money must be directed toward developing standardized datasets and benchmark tests, and (4) the community needs a large-scale, generalized, and programmatically accessible geographic information system (GIS). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers in Geosciences)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop