Special Issue "Detecting Geospace Perturbations Caused by Earth"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Hazards".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Georgios Balasis

Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, I. Metaxa & Vas. Pavlou St., GR-15236, Penteli, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +30-2108109185
Fax: +30-2106138343
Interests: solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling; geospace magnetic storms; magnetospheric waves; space weather
Guest Editor
Dr. Angelo De Santis

Section of Geomagnetism, Aeronomy and Environmental Geophysics, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma 2, Roma, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: geosystemics; seismotectonics; geomagnetism; ionospheric physics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Atmospheric gravity waves, produced by atmospheric processes, including tropospheric weather-related events and high-altitude forcing in the auroral zone, have long been known to produce traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), observed using radars (e.g., ionossondes). More recently, TIDs produced by atmospheric waves associated with natural hazards (e.g., Tsunamis, earthquakes, volcanoes) have been observed, which has been partly facilitated by the availability of newer technologies, such as GPS-derived total electron content (TEC).  When TIDs are produced, airglow emission variations are often also produced that are tied to the ion chemistry, also providing a way to observe the atmospheric signatures of natural hazard events. Magnetic fluctuations associated with ground currents induced by earthquakes have also been attributed to ionospheric disturbances. The interpretation of these observations has been aided by sophisticated numerical models.

This Special Issue will include papers presenting ionospheric and airglow observations of disturbances related to natural hazards, specialized data analysis methods, modelling/simulation of the generation of waves/disturbances due to natural hazard sources, the propagation of such disturbances, and their interaction with ionospheric processes. Ideally, papers will also attempt to discuss outstanding issues, limitations of either the models, data analysis methods, and/or observations, and ideas for novel future research.

Dr. Georgios Balasis
Dr. Angelo De Santis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Natural hazards
  • Gravity waves
  • Magnetospheric Waves
  • Geospace disturbances
  • Earth Observation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Tropospheric and Ionospheric Anomalies Induced by Volcanic and Saharan Dust Events as Part of Geosphere Interaction Phenomena
Geosciences 2019, 9(4), 177; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9040177
Received: 8 February 2019 / Revised: 5 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 17 April 2019
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Abstract
In this work, we assessed the possible relation of ionospheric perturbations observed by Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER), Global Positioning System total electron content (GPS TEC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-derived outgoing longwave-Earth radiation (OLR), and atmospheric chemical [...] Read more.
In this work, we assessed the possible relation of ionospheric perturbations observed by Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER), Global Positioning System total electron content (GPS TEC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-derived outgoing longwave-Earth radiation (OLR), and atmospheric chemical potential (ACP) measurements, with volcanic and Saharan dust events identified by ground and satellite-based medium infrared/thermal infrared (MIR/TIR) observations. The results indicated that the Mt. Etna (Italy) volcanic activity of 2006 was probably responsible for the ionospheric perturbations revealed by DEMETER on 4 November and 6 December and by GPS TEC observations on 4 November and 12 December. This activity also affected the OLR (on 26 October; 6 and 23 November; and 2, 6, and 14 December) and ACP (on 31 October–1 November) analyses. Similarly, two massive Saharan dust episodes, detected by Robust Satellite Techniques (RST) using Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) optical data, probably caused the ionospheric anomalies recorded, based on DEMETER and GPS TEC observations, over the Mediterranean basin in May 2008. The study confirmed the perturbing effects of volcanic and dust events on tropospheric and ionospheric parameters. Further, it demonstrated the advantages of using independent satellite observations to investigate atmospheric phenomena, which may not always be well documented. The impact of this increased detection capacity in reducing false positives, in the framework of a short-term seismic hazard forecast based on the study of ionospheric and tropospheric anomalies, is also addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Detecting Geospace Perturbations Caused by Earth)
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