Special Issue "Emerging and re-Emerging Arboviruses in Human Health"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Xavier de Lamballerie

Unité des Virus Émergents, Aix-Marseille Univ, faculty of Medicine, 27 Bd J Moulin, 13005 Marseille, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: RNA viruses; arboviruses; zoonoses; emergence; evolution; diagnosis; epidemiology; antivirals; vaccines
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jan Felix Drexler

Institute of Virology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Helmut-Ruska-Haus Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: emerging viruses; arboviruses and zoonotic viruses; molecular and serological diagnostics; epidemiology
Guest Editor
Prof. Ernest A. Gould

Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire Méditerranée-Infection, 19- Bd J Moulin, 13005 Marseille, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: emerging viruses; flaviviruses; virus evolution and phylogenies; arbovirus natural cycles

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The public health burden of arbovirus diseases is heavy in developing countries with pathogens such as Dengue virus, Chikungunya virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Zika virus, Yellow fever virus, and many others responsible for millions of new human infections each year, worldwide. Arboviruses have an impressive potential for emergence and re-emergence, and they are able to invade new territories, mostly in relation with human activities that modify the ecological characteristics of their natural environment, increase contacts between humans and sylvatic pathogens and allow rapid and remote dispersal of pathogens due to the increase of the mobility of people and goods. For a long time, developed countries considered the arboviral risk as "exotic", but with the West Nile outbreak in the United States and in Europe or at its borders autochthonous cases of West Nile, Chikungunya, Dengue, Toscana, Usutu, Tick-borne encephalitis and Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever, there is growing awareness that arboviruses represent a significant threat for local populations.

This research topic is focused on studies related to the all aspects of arbovirus emergence, from evolution and basic science to epidemiology and therapeutics. The objective is to understand better the parameters that underlie (re-) emergence and to contribute to preparedness and response against arboviral pathogens.

We cordially invite to researchers working actively in these fields to submit their original research or review manuscripts to this research topic on "Emerging and Re-Emerging Arboviruses in Human Health".

Prof. Dr. Xavier de Lamballerie
Prof. Dr. Jan-Felix Drexler
Prof. Ernest A. Gould
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • arboviruses
  • emergence
  • emerging viruses
  • Zika virus
  • Chikungunya virus
  • Dengue virus
  • Evolution
  • Epidemiology
  • therapeutics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview What Does the Future Hold for Yellow Fever Virus? (II)
Received: 20 June 2018 / Revised: 13 August 2018 / Accepted: 16 August 2018 / Published: 21 August 2018
PDF Full-text (1356 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As revealed by the recent resurgence of yellow fever virus (YFV) activity in the tropical regions of Africa and South America, YFV control measures need urgent rethinking. Over the last decade, most reported outbreaks occurred in, or eventually reached, areas with low vaccination
[...] Read more.
As revealed by the recent resurgence of yellow fever virus (YFV) activity in the tropical regions of Africa and South America, YFV control measures need urgent rethinking. Over the last decade, most reported outbreaks occurred in, or eventually reached, areas with low vaccination coverage but that are suitable for virus transmission, with an unprecedented risk of expansion to densely populated territories in Africa, South America and Asia. As reflected in the World Health Organization’s initiative launched in 2017, it is high time to strengthen epidemiological surveillance to monitor accurately viral dissemination, and redefine vaccination recommendation areas. Vector-control and immunisation measures need to be adapted and vaccine manufacturing must be reconciled with an increasing demand. We will have to face more yellow fever (YF) cases in the upcoming years. Hence, improving disease management through the development of efficient treatments will prove most beneficial. Undoubtedly, these developments will require in-depth descriptions of YFV biology at molecular, physiological and ecological levels. This second section of a two-part review describes the current state of knowledge and gaps regarding the molecular biology of YFV, along with an overview of the tools that can be used to manage the disease at the individual, local and global levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging and re-Emerging Arboviruses in Human Health)
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Open AccessReview What Does the Future Hold for Yellow Fever Virus? (I)
Received: 4 May 2018 / Revised: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 June 2018 / Published: 8 June 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2774 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The recent resurgence of yellow fever virus (YFV) activity in the tropical regions of Africa and South America has sparked renewed interest in this infamous arboviral disease. Yellow fever virus had been a human plague for centuries prior to the identification of its
[...] Read more.
The recent resurgence of yellow fever virus (YFV) activity in the tropical regions of Africa and South America has sparked renewed interest in this infamous arboviral disease. Yellow fever virus had been a human plague for centuries prior to the identification of its urban transmission vector, the Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (Linnaeus) mosquito species, and the development of an efficient live-attenuated vaccine, the YF-17D strain. The combination of vector-control measures and vaccination campaigns drastically reduced YFV incidence in humans on many occasions, but the virus never ceased to circulate in the forest, through its sylvatic invertebrate vector(s) and vertebrate host(s). Outbreaks recently reported in Central Africa (2015–2016) and Brazil (since late 2016), reached considerable proportions in terms of spatial distribution and total numbers of cases, with multiple exports, including to China. In turn, questions about the likeliness of occurrence of large urban YFV outbreaks in the Americas or of a successful import of YFV to Asia are currently resurfacing. This two-part review describes the current state of knowledge and gaps regarding the molecular biology and transmission dynamics of YFV, along with an overview of the tools that can be used to manage the disease at individual, local and global levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging and re-Emerging Arboviruses in Human Health)
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