Special Issue "Arthropod Genetics and Genomics"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Peter Arensburger Website E-Mail
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Interests: Bioinformatics; Transposable Elements; Invertebrates

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of arthropod genetics and genomics includes studies on iconic reference species as well as studies of recently sequenced species; it also includes research on disease vectors and research on social species, and it concerns species of immediate practical importance and those that are just beautifully interesting. It is not limited to the staggeringly diverse insects but also includes crustaceans, centipedes, arachnids, and many others species. Unsurprisingly, the research questions in this field are correspondingly diverse, including works on molecular pathways, whole genomes comparisons, population genetics, and repeated sequences analysis, among many others. With such a breadth of scope, even finding a single uniting theme can be challenging; however, it is undeniable that the advent of inexpensive, large-scale sequencing technology has laid the genomic foundations for the field, with initiatives such as the I5K project providing many new reference genomes. Such a diversity of research objects and themes would already make this a fascinating subject for a Special Issue, but arthropod genetics and genomics is also a timely subject, as these animals continue to be major vectors of disease (some insect populations are apparently in rapid decline). By necessity, the articles in this Special Issue represent only the smallest sliver of work in this field, but we hope that they will give the reader a chance to get a sense of how wide the field is, appreciate how far it has come, and hopefully get a glimpse to where it is headed.

Dr. Peter Arensburger
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Arthropod
  • Genomics
  • Genetics
  • Genome
  • Insect
  • Sequencing
  • Phylogeny, Vector

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Gradual Distance Dispersal Shapes the Genetic Structure in an Alpine Grasshopper
Genes 2019, 10(8), 590; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10080590 - 05 Aug 2019
Abstract
The location of the high mountains of southern Europe has been crucial in the phylogeography of most European species, but how extrinsic (topography of sky islands) and intrinsic features (dispersal dynamics) have interacted to shape the genetic structure in alpine restricted species is [...] Read more.
The location of the high mountains of southern Europe has been crucial in the phylogeography of most European species, but how extrinsic (topography of sky islands) and intrinsic features (dispersal dynamics) have interacted to shape the genetic structure in alpine restricted species is still poorly known. Here we investigated the mechanisms explaining the colonisation of Cantabrian sky islands in an endemic flightless grasshopper. We scrutinised the maternal genetic variability and haplotype structure, and we evaluated the fitting of two migration models to understand the extant genetic structure in these populations: Long-distance dispersal (LDD) and gradual distance dispersal (GDD). We found that GDD fits the real data better than the LDD model, with an onset of the expansion matching postglacial expansions after the retreat of the ice sheets. Our findings suggest a scenario with small carrying capacity, migration rates, and population growth rates, being compatible with a slow dispersal process. The gradual expansion process along the Cantabrian sky islands found here seems to be conditioned by the suitability of habitats and the presence of alpine corridors. Our findings shed light on our understanding about how organisms which have adapted to live in alpine habitats with limited dispersal abilities have faced new and suitable environmental conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthropod Genetics and Genomics)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization and Phylogenetic Implications of the Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Syrphidae
Genes 2019, 10(8), 563; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10080563 - 25 Jul 2019
Abstract
In this study, the complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of two hoverfly species of Korinchia angustiabdomena (Huo, Ren, and Zheng) and Volucella nigricans Coquillett (Diptera: Syrphidae) were determined and analyzed. The circular mitogenomes were 16,473 bp in K. angustiabdomena (GenBank No. MK870078) and 15,724 [...] Read more.
In this study, the complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of two hoverfly species of Korinchia angustiabdomena (Huo, Ren, and Zheng) and Volucella nigricans Coquillett (Diptera: Syrphidae) were determined and analyzed. The circular mitogenomes were 16,473 bp in K. angustiabdomena (GenBank No. MK870078) and 15,724 bp in V. nigricans (GenBank No. MK870079). Two newly sequenced mitogenomes both contained 37 genes, and the gene order was similar with other syrphine species. All the protein-coding genes (PCGs) were started with the standard ATN codons; and most of PCGs were terminated with a TAA stop codon, while ND1 in K. angustiabdomena ended with a TAG codon, and ND5 terminated with truncated T stop codons in both species. The phylogenetic relationship between K. angustiabdomena and V. nigricans with related lineages was reconstructed using Bayesian inference and Maximum-likelihood analyses. The monophyly of each family considered within Muscomorpha was confirmed by the clades in the phylogenetic tree, and superfamily of the Oestroidea (Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, and Oestridae) was unexpectedly found to be a paraphyletic group based on our selected data. This mitogenome information for K. angustiabdomena and V. nigricans could facilitate future studies of evolutionarily related insects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthropod Genetics and Genomics)
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Open AccessArticle
Survey of the Bradysia odoriphaga Transcriptome Using PacBio Single-Molecule Long-Read Sequencing
Genes 2019, 10(6), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10060481 - 25 Jun 2019
Abstract
The damage caused by Bradysia odoriphaga is the main factor threatening the production of vegetables in the Liliaceae family. However, few genetic studies of B. odoriphaga have been conducted because of a lack of genomic resources. Many long-read sequencing technologies have been developed [...] Read more.
The damage caused by Bradysia odoriphaga is the main factor threatening the production of vegetables in the Liliaceae family. However, few genetic studies of B. odoriphaga have been conducted because of a lack of genomic resources. Many long-read sequencing technologies have been developed in the last decade; therefore, in this study, the transcriptome including all development stages of B. odoriphaga was sequenced for the first time by Pacific single-molecule long-read sequencing. Here, 39,129 isoforms were generated, and 35,645 were found to have annotation results when checked against sequences available in different databases. Overall, 18,473 isoforms were distributed in 25 various Clusters of Orthologous Groups, and 11,880 isoforms were categorized into 60 functional groups that belonged to the three main Gene Ontology classifications. Moreover, 30,610 isoforms were assigned into 44 functional categories belonging to six main Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes functional categories. Coding DNA sequence (CDS) prediction showed that 36,419 out of 39,129 isoforms were predicted to have CDS, and 4319 simple sequence repeats were detected in total. Finally, 266 insecticide resistance and metabolism-related isoforms were identified as candidate genes for further investigation of insecticide resistance and metabolism in B. odoriphaga. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthropod Genetics and Genomics)
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